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Old 09-27-2013, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
1,999 posts, read 1,985,584 times
Reputation: 568

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Redshadowz View Post
I spent most of my early life living in places which didn't even have air-conditioning if that tells you anything. And this is in Oklahoma, where it gets pretty dang hot.
Just for the record, I grew up in the Black-American middle-class, and during the 1970s and early '80s, very few middle-class homes had AC.

We put our fans in the windows. LOL.

My mother tells me when she was a kid every winter in Wisconsin her parents (middle-class) would open the windows in her bedroom she shared with her sister. Heat was shut off at night (some people still turn their heat off or set it at 60 degrees to turn on in Milwaukee during the winter to lower their costs). She tells me it was believed back then that cold air was healthy for you while you slept. You any idea how cold it gets during winters in Wisconsin? LOL.
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Old 09-27-2013, 12:36 PM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 7,305,744 times
Reputation: 13779
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emigrations View Post
I'm not from Brentwood, and because I earn so little ($25k after a bachelors, seven certifications and three years experience), it's difficult to leave. I am not fortunate enough to live in an area that is commutable for interviews to a prosperous area like Brentwood. The point of this thread is that where a person is born and raised largely determines where they end up in an economy that is inflexible. Parents who raise their children in bad areas just destroy they child's future prospects
That's nonsense. You've found a new excuse to blame for your own situation.

You obviously went to college somewhere. So it wasn't Harvard or Stanford. Well, boohoo! There are millions of Americans who are making good livings who didn't go to any big name school. It's NOT the school that determines your success, it's you and what you put into your education.

I grew up in a small town in one of the poorest counties in NYS where my father worked in a local factory and farmed on the side. I graduated from Buffalo State College, a school that would never, ever be confused with any top tier university or college. When I went there, it was an urban commuter school transitioning from teachers college to liberal arts college. Most of my college classmates were the first ones in our families to go to college. It's still predominantly an urban commuter school with a significant proportion of its student body minority and economically disadvantaged.

Would my life have been different if I'd gone to Cornell or Syracuse? Maybe. Maybe not. It certainly would have been different if I had taken that 8am computer science class one of my ditzy girlfriends wanted me to take, because I would have realized that computer programming was what I wanted to do a decade sooner than I did. Unfortunately, I chose to sleep later and took something else, but that's on me, and nobody else.
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Old 09-27-2013, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Florida
25 posts, read 45,197 times
Reputation: 49
I have seen plenty of people who grew up in an urban area that have amounted to nothing. Urban areas also have drugs, violence, poor schools, broken families, poverty, and the what not. I grew up in a small town. I went to school there and when the time came I attended the local community college (AKA Harvard on the Highway). Then I went into the military, got out and attended a 4 year school. Now I do just fine and I am raising my kids in a small town. The economy here is decent, the schools are good, the crime is low. Families are involved and I love it.

Life is what you make of it. If you have the drive and determination to better yourself, then you will. Regardless of where you come from, big city or small town. In the end the personal responsibility to improve your standing is yours.
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Old 09-27-2013, 09:21 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
7,303 posts, read 10,038,902 times
Reputation: 5887
For all of you proud of your rural/small town upbringing:


Little Big Town - Boondocks - YouTube
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Old 09-27-2013, 09:47 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
1,999 posts, read 1,985,584 times
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^Hey, I kind of like that song. Thanks hipping me to it.
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Old 09-27-2013, 10:07 PM
 
8,949 posts, read 8,064,190 times
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Many small towns, have better education facilities and are rated very highly. Some small towns have poor education facilities and are rated very low.

BUT (notice that is a big but), the same can be said for bigger city schools. It all depends on what the parents in the area are willing to accept or put up with.

When you finish school in an area of low opportunities, you can move to where the opportunities are way better. You are not tied to an area forever except by choice. Problem, too many people do not have the ambition to make a move to improve their quality of life, and just cry and moan about how unfair life is to them.
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Old 09-28-2013, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Long Neck,De
4,792 posts, read 6,773,446 times
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While some small town folks may miss some of the "opportunities'offered in the big urban areas it can be a life style very suited to them.
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Old 09-28-2013, 10:21 AM
 
Location: USA
6,220 posts, read 5,338,923 times
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I grew up in a smaller town (6,000) and anyone who was smart and did well in school got out of there. There just isn't much opportunity in a small town for someone ambitious and driven. The potheads I went to school with that hung around the local 7 eleven all day are STILL hanging there although 15+ years later.
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Old 09-28-2013, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Midwest City, Oklahoma
8,090 posts, read 4,700,644 times
Reputation: 2877
Quote:
Originally Posted by Supine View Post
Just for the record, I grew up in the Black-American middle-class, and during the 1970s and early '80s, very few middle-class homes had AC.

We put our fans in the windows. LOL.

My mother tells me when she was a kid every winter in Wisconsin her parents (middle-class) would open the windows in her bedroom she shared with her sister. Heat was shut off at night (some people still turn their heat off or set it at 60 degrees to turn on in Milwaukee during the winter to lower their costs). She tells me it was believed back then that cold air was healthy for you while you slept. You any idea how cold it gets during winters in Wisconsin? LOL.
Honestly. I always slept really good in the cold. I would just roll up under like three heavy blankets. With multiple blankets covering my head. Usually with a "tunnel" from my mouth leading out of the blankets into the room. As to allow an exchange of air, but not freeze my face. And I would sleep solid like that all night, barely moving. And I would wake up feeling quite refreshed(though, I never wanted to get out of bed, and I would take blankets with me all over the house). I remember all the time changing my clothes for school under my blankets.


Anyway, I think thats why I never have sympathy for people who claim that money is so important. My family never had money when I was growing up, and I always remember being really happy. I had two sisters who were close to me in age, and they were sort of my best friends(though I had plenty of other friends). We used to go everywhere together, and we were called the "three little ones".

In fact, I was talking to one my sisters just yesterday about shoes. She was telling her son that "When we were younger, we would go everywhere without shoes." And since we were already poor, everyone thought we were even more poor than we actually were. They called us the "shoeless family". Even though we actually had shoes.


It really wasn't until we got even got older that money even became something we even worried about. And that was only because others around us worried about money. Or should I say, they basically pretended how much better they were because they had money. This is especially true in Junior high and High school, where people start to "compete" for their place in the world. Where people become obsessed with wearing nice clothes and driving nice cars and having nice things, largely for the purpose of showing them off.


I think this is probably the root of my seething hatred for public education. I think it unnaturally places people in age-segregated environments. In which, the priorities in life become popularity. And we are talking popularity from adults, we are talking popularity only from people of their same age. And since the attention of young people tends to come from petty things, such as material possessions, or violence(being tough). Then you create a culture which glorifies fighting and money. And most of the time, people don't grow out of this "youth culture" until they have been living in the real world for a while. Usually by their late 20's or early to mid 30's. Though, some never grow out of it.



The point is, there is a difference between being poor and feeling poor. I remember I used to ask people to define what rich is. Its sort of hard to come up with a definition of rich. Many will try to say its if you make over a certain amount of money. Or even that you are in a certain percentage of all incomes.

The problem of course is that everyone's definition of rich is going to be different. People who earn $20,000 a year might say people who make $60,000 a year are rich. But do people who make $60,000 a year think they are rich? Someone who makes $60,000 a year might say people who make $200,000 a year are rich. But do people who make $200,000 a year think they are rich? Probably not.

The best definition for rich in my opinion. Is that you basically have an abundance of whatever you find to be important in life. There are ways to live a "rich life" without money. Many people will say someone with a big family is "rich". And in a sense, they are right. Many people with more money than you can even imagine, don't feel rich, because they don't find their life to have an abundance of whatever is important to them. They always feel lacking, and never content. And so, they do not live a rich life.


Thus, the real key to feeling rich, is to have an abundance of what you find important. And what is important is different for everyone. And what you define as abundance is also different for everyone. But know this, you'll never be happy until you are content with what you have. And if you let others make you feel less than you are, then you will never be happy.


I had a job in which I worked 24 hours a week, for $7.50 an hour. I was making about $650 a month bring-home on average. I lived with my sister. And I remember people were always harassing me about how I needed to work more, or I needed to be paid more. And I would always say, I have everything I want, why would I want to waste more of my life working to have more things that I don't even need? After which I would say, I am far richer than you. And then they would laugh at me.

But this is coming from people who work all the time, are constantly unhappy, complaining about their jobs practically from the second they come home from work till the time they go to bed. And spend most of their lives boozed up or on one kind of drug or another. Its sad really.
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Old 09-29-2013, 06:37 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,101,589 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emigrations View Post
when most small towns can be shown to be demonstrably inferior in every social metric to major urban areas?
Link, please.

North Dakota ranks second in the USA in percentage of students going on to a college degree. And, ranks last in the USA in percentage of students going on to prison.
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