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Old 02-07-2009, 11:43 AM
 
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A delusional person may think of himself as "normal", while others are "delusional". And, he may further claim that the whole deal of "being delusional" is mystical, it all depends on one's beliefs, nothing really can be proven one way or the other, as long as one has faith in what he is doing.

How do you give a philosophical answer to him?
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Old 02-07-2009, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Toronto, ON
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Question Once we have God, who is a delusion too little to himself....

...The delusional person may be at a delusion for himself, but God can be counted on to recover him. I believe that Bishop Bekeley has some subject of mind being aware of itself with others watching through time. Or if we fall into solipsism then the mind being in Time must be in relation to a creator.
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Old 02-07-2009, 12:03 PM
 
Location: The #1 sunshine state, Arizona.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DFW123 View Post
A delusional person may think of himself as "normal", while others are "delusional". And, he may further claim that the whole deal of "being delusional" is mystical, it all depends on one's beliefs, nothing really can be proven one way or the other, as long as one has faith in what he is doing.

How do you give a philosophical answer to him?
A person can be diagnosed delusional by his thoughts, words and deeds. A delusional person can think whatever he likes, however if deemed mentally incompetent he might have a person (assigned by a court of law) to make important decisions for him.
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Old 02-07-2009, 12:35 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DFW123 View Post
A delusional person may think of himself as "normal", while others are "delusional". And, he may further claim that the whole deal of "being delusional" is mystical, it all depends on one's beliefs, nothing really can be proven one way or the other, as long as one has faith in what he is doing.

How do you give a philosophical answer to him?

a philosophical answer where philosophy /-ies /-ists are hard to come by?

psychology perhaps.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delusional_disorder

PEP Web - The Schreber Case: The Discreet Charm of the Paranoid Solution

(we are getting to secret LaW, so let us not start out with indirect accusations of one another. history is replete with such traumatic experiences.)
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Old 02-07-2009, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Nashville, Tn
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Of course we're talking about some form of mental illness or possibly severe problems with drug addiction so I don't necessarily see this an a philosophical issue but rather a medical one but it is an interesting question. I've known a couple of people who have suffered from serious mental illness and I don't think they had a clue that they were delusional but it was obvious to those around them. One guy from my home town that I knew very well in my teens contacted me many years later when I was living in another city. He was incoherent and kept on rambling on about how he had become a famous writer and would become very aggravated if anyone questioned that belief. I found out he was living with his Mother who had to take care of him because he could no longer take care of himself. I think a serious drug problem may have played a part in his situation but I honestly don't know what had happened to him. He was clearly delusional and basically lived in a fantasy world. His interactions with those around him left him agitated and resentful because anyone could see that he was a very ill and troubled person. I think this situation is probably common for those who are suffering from delusions.
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Old 02-07-2009, 03:50 PM
Status: "Selling homes...." (set 26 days ago)
 
Location: Sarasota, Florida
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First you have to define "delusional", then we'll go from there.
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Old 02-07-2009, 04:00 PM
 
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I dunno...ask dismal, dubious, delusional dubya
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Old 02-07-2009, 11:02 PM
 
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delusional americans

no further comment.
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Old 02-08-2009, 01:44 AM
 
Location: Toronto, ON
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The Anthropology of Hegel's rationalism called the delusional Will as inevitable in the radically distinct frenzy in habits failing over and against the flagmatic confrontation of our self-feeling (which is the healthy existence of the soul). The self-feeling is always short of being an Ego. Our ego surpasses Self and we cast at our appearances of unlit adrenalin.

In phenomenology our adrenolin is lit to a true experience of objectives. Better watch out. I'm in delusion now over the reason they don't believe I can contractually get myself arranged. (Do is do.)
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Old 02-08-2009, 01:54 AM
 
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
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I have spoken with people who suffer from hallucinations (i.e. delusional) in a job I used to have. Some were aware these hallucinations were not real, some thought they were real, some even thought everyone had hallucinations.

Depends on the person I guess. The ones who weren't aware they were hallucinating were by far worse off because they were affraid about what the hallucinations were showing them, often acting out based on what they had seen and heard. One man kept hearing his dead wifes voice, he thought it real and that he had fallen to soundly asleep and she was hurt and needing him. He was very upset by it all, poor thing.
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