U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Arizona > Phoenix area
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Old 12-01-2010, 07:45 PM
 
Location: Oregon/Arizona
88 posts, read 104,544 times
Reputation: 134

Advertisements

Hey, that's way better than alot of people would of thought. If they ever decide to truly fund education in this state, Phoenix would be in the top 10.
Kind of a fun article that shows nothing new, but paints a better picture of the valley with great potential to the upside.

Phoenix No. 100 out of 200 in brainpower | Phoenix Business Journal
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-01-2010, 11:26 PM
 
2,943 posts, read 3,739,325 times
Reputation: 1123
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenNorthwestScott View Post
Hey, that's way better than alot of people would of thought. If they ever decide to truly fund education in this state, Phoenix would be in the top 10.
Kind of a fun article that shows nothing new, but paints a better picture of the valley with great potential to the upside.

Phoenix No. 100 out of 200 in brainpower | Phoenix Business Journal
I guess we are "average".

Still, some of the dumbest people I know are the most educated and some of the smartest people I know are the least educated. I don't think a piece of paper means one is smart or the lack thereof means one is dumb.
It just means some folks made different decisions than others, took a different path than others, and had different priorities than others.

The number of CEOs with a "lack of education" is surprising. I wonder if those people lack "brainpower"?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2010, 07:45 AM
 
Location: Historic Central Phoenix
652 posts, read 1,612,181 times
Reputation: 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ritchie_az View Post
I
Still, some of the dumbest people I know are the most educated and some of the smartest people I know are the least educated. I don't think a piece of paper means one is smart or the lack thereof means one is dumb.
Whenever someone says "I'm not book smart, but I'm street smart," all I hear is "I'm not real smart, but I'm imaginary smart."
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2010, 10:08 AM
 
2,943 posts, read 3,739,325 times
Reputation: 1123
Quote:
Originally Posted by nickw252 View Post
Whenever someone says "I'm not book smart, but I'm street smart," all I hear is "I'm not real smart, but I'm imaginary smart."
I think people choose different paths in life. My dad is very smart--does one of the most difficult jobs in America... is a manager of a facility... exceeds at everything he does. His education level? High School Diploma.
I look at things like this:
CEOs Without College Degrees: Who Needs Higher Education? - BusinessWeek
15 Successful Entrepreneurs Who Didn’t Need College | College-Startup
Are these people "dumb" or lack "brainpower"?

Anyone who thinks that because they have a college degree and someone else doesn't it means that they are smart and the other person is dumb--well, that person is both ignorant and arrogant.

People choose different paths.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2010, 10:31 AM
 
Location: San Jose, CA
6,356 posts, read 10,676,608 times
Reputation: 7633
I think some people are confusing college degrees with education. One has little to do with the other. One can be highly educated, and have no college degree. You can rest assured that all of those CEOs without degrees are highly educated in their fields and are very book smart.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2010, 10:48 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
1,046 posts, read 1,973,288 times
Reputation: 826
These ratings are interesting things. I have spent a great deal of time in high rated "brain" cities like SF and Seattle and here are some observations I experienced first hand:

1. The middle class living many take for granted here in the Valley is an expensive privilege in those cities.
2. The quality of life appears to be less than optimal for those not in the upper income brackets (see item 1).
3. Oppressive anonymity, lots of frowns and harried living.

What I saw consistently again and again.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2010, 11:02 AM
 
Location: I-40
1,931 posts, read 1,275,625 times
Reputation: 1114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ritchie_az View Post
I think people choose different paths in life. My dad is very smart--does one of the most difficult jobs in America... is a manager of a facility... exceeds at everything he does. His education level? High School Diploma.
I look at things like this:
CEOs Without College Degrees: Who Needs Higher Education? - BusinessWeek
15 Successful Entrepreneurs Who Didn’t Need College | College-Startup
Are these people "dumb" or lack "brainpower"?

Anyone who thinks that because they have a college degree and someone else doesn't it means that they are smart and the other person is dumb--well, that person is both ignorant and arrogant.

People choose different paths.
There are always exceptions to the rule. That is no reason to scorn or undervalue a college education.

Should you ever need a quadruple bypass, who are you going to choose to perform the operation?

Do you want to fly in an airplane that was designed and built by a "self taught" street smart person?

Being "naturally" smart, but not doing anything with it is truly sad and perhaps indicative that the person is not so smart after all. What's important is what you do with your brains.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2010, 01:15 PM
 
2,943 posts, read 3,739,325 times
Reputation: 1123
Quote:
Originally Posted by EDnurse View Post
There are always exceptions to the rule. That is no reason to scorn or undervalue a college education.

Should you ever need a quadruple bypass, who are you going to choose to perform the operation?

Do you want to fly in an airplane that was designed and built by a "self taught" street smart person?

Being "naturally" smart, but not doing anything with it is truly sad and perhaps indicative that the person is not so smart after all. What's important is what you do with your brains.
I don't "scorn" or "undervalue" a college education. I'm simply stating that there are many ways to learn and educate. Some choose college (great!) some choose other paths (great!). Both are fine.

I'm just pointing out that using the number of folks with college degrees as a method to determine how smart a city is can be misleading.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2010, 08:35 PM
 
4,403 posts, read 3,665,759 times
Reputation: 2859
Quote:
Originally Posted by _Charles_ View Post
These ratings are interesting things. I have spent a great deal of time in high rated "brain" cities like SF and Seattle and here are some observations I experienced first hand:

1. The middle class living many take for granted here in the Valley is an expensive privilege in those cities.
2. The quality of life appears to be less than optimal for those not in the upper income brackets (see item 1).
3. Oppressive anonymity, lots of frowns and harried living.

What I saw consistently again and again.
I lived in both SF and SEA and I think what you're describing has more to do with the density and urbanity of those cities than the population's educational attainment. Yes, both places are expensive...because they are desirable places to live. SF pays pretty well as a result and SEA, because it's in WA state, has no state income tax, so both cities are awash with money (old in SF and new in SEA).

Anonymity is a trait that any urban area seems to possess. I'm totally anonymous here in Phoenix. However, living in those two places, I bumped into people, often literally which, in hindsight, put a smile on my face. Here, the only way I can bump into somebody is if I drive in their lane.

Others here noted that a college degree is not always a measure of intelligence, but when you have such a high degree of people with college degrees, I'd imagine the range of possible ideologies and creativity is astronomical compared to rural areas. I'm not saying that's better, it's just logical.

I love Boulder and Fort Collins, near the top of the list. And SF and SEA, of course. But it's cold or it snows in all those places. No thanks. I'll take today's perfect 76 and dry any day! Phoenix average? Naw! If you live here, you're pretty smart.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-03-2010, 08:16 AM
 
5,083 posts, read 5,125,684 times
Reputation: 6421
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ritchie_az View Post
Anyone who thinks that because they have a college degree and someone else doesn't it means that they are smart and the other person is dumb--well, that person is both ignorant and arrogant.

People choose different paths.
Totally agree. Nowadays, it's more about marketable skills, not always dependent on a college degree.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Arizona > Phoenix area

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top