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Old 04-10-2011, 12:07 PM
 
825 posts, read 570,208 times
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I have some companies coming out to give estimates next week, but I was wondering in general how much should I expect to pay for tree removal? The tree is about 35 feet tall. Many branches. No idea what kind it is.
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Old 04-10-2011, 12:30 PM
 
461 posts, read 576,827 times
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I had a mature African Sumac tree removed recently from my backyard; it was about 18 ft high with a trunk about 10 inches thick. Cost me $212 for cutting down the tree and another $132 for the stump removal. So about $350 total.

You'll want to research what type of tree it is, and whether or not you need to do the stump removal. Because I'm going to be building a concrete wall, I really needed them to get rid of the roots, because at least for the African Sumac, the roots are huge, invasive, and can cause damage to walls, etc. Also, some trees, like the African Sumac, will not truly 'die' unless you get rid of the roots! So, it's something for you to research before the contractors come out to give you estimates.

I had mine done by Integrity Tree Services...very happy with their work, and as many here might recall, I'm a pretty fussy customer when it comes to contractors! You might be able to find a better price than I did(i.e. guy with a chainsaw), but these guys seem to know what they're doing, they're reliable and timely (plus, they did a good job of clean-up afterward, which I find so many contractors are lacking in the desire/ability to do).
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Old 04-10-2011, 02:57 PM
 
Location: South Tempe, AZ
14,198 posts, read 17,750,597 times
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Get a few estimates. They can range all over the place. I got two estimates the last time I had a tree removed, one was twice as much as the other. Sounds like Xica got a good price, I might call them myself soon as I need another one removed!
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Old 04-11-2011, 05:24 PM
 
Location: Peoria, AZ
162 posts, read 237,424 times
Reputation: 134
Xica's quote sounds like a pretty good price. Personally I'm broke, I just can't afford to hire anyone period. So I just do that kind of stuff myself. I had 7 african sumacs in my backyard when I moved into my house in 07. So far I have 3 left. Replacing them with less messy, more fruitful type trees. I really don't understand the whole fuss about removing a tree and I'm a computer geek. You take a darned chainsaw, use your brain (like don't do something really stupid... takes less than an hour to read up on chainsaw safety and watch some videos to learn about what not to do) and chop away. you don't have to fell the whole tree at once. you start at the ends of branches (they have these things called "ladders") and just chop a few feet off at once in such a way that you can control where the pieces fall. Then you can chop the bigger pieces into small ones, stack them, let them dry and burn them in your fireplace in the winter. It's great exercise and I probably saved over a thousand dollars just with those 4 trees. Digging out the roots is a lot more trouble, although that's even better exercise. I have dug mine out the hard way with shovel, mattock and lots of sweat and elbow grease. You can hire someone to grind down the root ball if you want. I've had offers in the $50-100 range per tree. I wouldn't tackle an 80 foot tall pine tree that is 2-3 feet in diameter, but the trees I chopped down were in the 25-30 ft range and had absolutelly no problems. People say "What if... a branch falls on your house or your neighbors house..etc" That's baloney, if you use your brain there are no what ifs. Just think twice before everything you do. Don't do anything stupid and you're fine.
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Old 04-12-2011, 12:08 AM
 
Location: Historic Central Phoenix
652 posts, read 1,609,526 times
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Is there a reason why you want to pay to have it done? 35 feet isn't very large, I recently had a similar issue so I bought a chain saw and cut it down branch by branch and took it to the alley during the bulk pickup.

Unless there is some reason to have it professionally done like it will fall onto a power-line or into a pool I recommend doing it yourself.
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Old 04-12-2011, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Peoria, AZ
162 posts, read 237,424 times
Reputation: 134
yeah I wasn't sure I should post the stuff about doing it yourself. I guess I wouldn't want to be guilty of encouraging someone to get into something that might be over their heads, but really I've done it many times and I'm a pretty clumsy person. If you don't feel comfortable doing it, don't jump into it just because we said, but on the other hand, you'll be amazed how quickly you can bring down the whole thing. It's not rocket science, just common sense. There are a few main things to adhere to when doing this kind of thing:
- Always have at least 3 points of contact when you're climbing or on a ladder: I usually have both feet on a ladder or branches and one arm wrapped around a branch or something like that. if you slip, you at least have 2 remaining points of contact.
- When I use a ladder next to a tree, I almost always tie the top of the ladder to a limb or the trunk. that makes it more stable. (of course, you don't tie it to the part you're about to cut, you only see that in cartoons)
- To avoid kickback: Use a anti-kickback chain, Never cut with the tip of the chainsaw, always use the cutting area closer to the handle. Keep your head to one side (not directly above the cutting path. Hold the saw firmly, and allow it to gain speed before you cut into a branch. Maintain high speed as you're cutting. if you let it slow down to much, kickback is more likely to happen. Watch out so the tip of your saw doesn't hit some other branch. read up on kickback.
- Before you make a cut, visualize what will happen. For example, I tend to not cut branches all the way through and that creates a hinge that makes it fall slower. Hinge situations can sometimes be dangerous if you don't know what you're doing.
- Always have the chainbrake engaged while the saw is idling, and engage it with the back of your hand the second you're done with a cut (I can't stress this enough. I grew up back when chainsaws didn't have chain brakes. Talk about insane danger. That safety feature has saved many people, so use it) Also make sure you don't dissengage it by mistake by bumping into stuff.
There's your intro to chainsaw safety 101. have fun and be safe.
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Old 04-12-2011, 05:36 PM
 
Location: Historic Central Phoenix
652 posts, read 1,609,526 times
Reputation: 359
Great advice on the chainsaw. You don't want to learn the hard way
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Old 04-12-2011, 05:45 PM
 
Location: Green Bay WI
133 posts, read 148,681 times
Reputation: 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by greendesert View Post
- When I use a ladder next to a tree, I almost always tie the top of the ladder to a limb or the trunk. that makes it more stable. (of course, you don't tie it to the part you're about to cut, you only see that in cartoons)
now that is some funny stuff
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Old 04-13-2011, 05:53 PM
 
523 posts, read 532,370 times
Reputation: 201
I just had to have two trees removed, and it cost me $200 a piece.
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