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Old 04-20-2012, 01:49 AM
 
Location: Chandler, AZ
39 posts, read 44,647 times
Reputation: 69
All of the pros have been listed. I love it here, but there are a couple cons:

1. It almost never rains, is almost never cloudy. Doesn't sound bad, but I miss the cloudy rainy days and nights sometimes.

2. PHX is so sprawled out, it is not a walkable metro area unless you live downtown scottsdale, downtown phx, or downtown tempe. I don't just mean near downtown...I mean in the core of it.

 
Old 04-20-2012, 09:37 AM
 
Location: The desert southwest
1,076 posts, read 938,539 times
Reputation: 856
The previous posters have done a great job outlining some of the Pros and Cons of living here, but I want to add something I've noticed. I read more than a few threads where people said they once lived here, moved away and now hope to move back. I too have experienced this (twice!!), and want to state that we sometimes take living in the valley of the sun for granted. No, it's not like NY, LA or any of the other major cities and I believe that's where we miss the uniqueness that is Phoenix.

Living here, you love it during winters and find the best way to deal with the summers, but honestly, life out here is not bad. It's not the type of city that jumps out at you with all this exciting stuff to do, but there is plenty to get involved in, especially outdoors. Is it perfect? No. Do I still have some issues with aspects of desert living? Yes. However, I also have learned how spoiled I have become by the consistent weather and laid-back lifestyle here. That, in itself, sometimes leads to people taking it for granted. Just saying!
 
Old 04-20-2012, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Arizona, The American Southwest
41,856 posts, read 18,721,710 times
Reputation: 79227
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magnum Mike View Post
Pros:
.....
2 - Phoenix is in the center of the State of Arizona, so you'll have convenient access to other areas in the state, which is advantageous because you can go from desert climate, to mountains in about an hour or two. All the mountains are north and north east of the Phoenix area, that vary in elevation from 4,000 to 9,500 feet, so you can go from sun tanning in Phoenix, to skiing just west of Flagstaff in about two hours.
.....
I need to make a clarification on the elevations of the mountains that we have in Arizona and are not too far from Phoenix. I mentioned 9,500 feet as an elevation and to avoid any confusion, 9.500 feet is the highest area that is accessible by a graded road, using an automobile in Arizona, it's the base of the Snowbowl Ski Resort, a little over 2 hours north of Phoenix, and about 30 minutes west of Flagstaff, in the San Francisco Peaks. Those peaks are the highest in Arizona and they rise up to an elevation of 12,633 feet above sea level. The ski resort does have ski lifts that will take you up to 11,500 feet, and they operate in the summer as well.

This also brings up another pro about the Phoenix area, and the entire State of Arizona - Hiking trails - They are in abundance here, there are many of them in the mountains/hills in and around the Phoenix area, and all over the state.
 
Old 04-20-2012, 11:38 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
595 posts, read 581,861 times
Reputation: 615
Weather is definitely the biggest pro. Yes, it's been said again and again. But, when I can be relaxing in my backyard in shorts and a T-shirt, hop in my car, drive two hours, and be in 2 feet of snow, it's pretty nice. Basically, you have all the perks of living near a ski slope, without having to shovel your driveway, or unbury your car each morning.

Summers here are hot (I moved here in August, 2011 -- caught the end of summer). There's no denying that. But, honestly, I'd take 115 degrees here, over 95 degrees in the Southeast any day of the week. When people talk about a "dry heat", there's actually something to it. Though, as techaz said, you actually DO get tired of sunshine. The weather here is so predictable and boring. I miss random spring thunderstorms.

The sprawl, in my mind, is a huge con. I plan on buying a house soon, and am looking in the Phoenix historic districts, as well as downtown Phoenix, and downtown Tempe / Mill Ave district -- I can't stand being a 20 minute drive from everything. Gotta be someplace more walkable.

Another thing is public transit. A lot of people here complain about it, but it's a work in progress, and definitely a lot better than some other places I've lived. It's mostly a bus system, with a single light rail line that runs from Western Mesa, through Tempe, to Downtown Phoenix, then up the Central Ave corridor. There's plans in the works for a streetcar up and down the Mill Ave corridor in Tempe (north of US-60), and talks about expanding the light rail, though there's a lot of controversy about it (definitely discussion for another thread). If you want to use public transit, you definitely have to plan well -- live and work close to the stops, and make as few transfers as possible.

The biggest pro of all, in my mind, is the scenery. People who have lived out here there whole lives tell me about how boring it is out here, there's nothing but dirt and shrubs. But anywhere in the Valley, on a clear day, you will see mountains on the horizon. Go down Riggs road, and you see vast, empty desert as far as the eye can see. If you're up for a long, complicated drive, take the Apache Trail from Mesa, up to Roosevelt Lake, and tell me Arizona is a boring, ugly state.
 
Old 04-20-2012, 12:05 PM
 
Location: Utopia
1,999 posts, read 6,178,374 times
Reputation: 1314
Because the area built up fast and there are so many folks from other parts of the country, I find people unusually friendly here. I love it here myself.
 
Old 04-20-2012, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Arizona, The American Southwest
41,856 posts, read 18,721,710 times
Reputation: 79227
I wasn't sure what to say about the rain in Central Arizona/Phoenix area because it is a pro and a con, depending on your own preferences. For me, I've taken a neutral position on it, because I like it when we get it, and I like the abundance of sunshine too. Our annual rainfall is below average, but.. you should expect that if you want to live in a dry desert region. For the most part, we get most of the rain during the monsoon season, which is usually from late July through August, sometimes into September, although I remember a dry monsoon season last year.

From October, until the end of May, rain storms are sporadic, and we do get just enough rain to keep everything green. The mountain areas do get a lot more annual rainfall than Phoenix.
 
Old 04-20-2012, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Willo Historic District, Phoenix, AZ
1,498 posts, read 1,618,345 times
Reputation: 1363
Quote:
Originally Posted by SubconsciousMe View Post
Pros
-- If you need to go to college, in-state tuition is low (all things considered) for public universities.
That may be, although I would imagine that people paying that tuition might disagree with you, given all of the increases in recent years.

But you have to realize that you get what you pay for. The state universities are just not the quality that you find in (some) other states. There is nothing here that is on par with schools like Berkeley, UCLA, Michigan, Virginia or North Carolina. If you look at the US News ranking of public schools, you will see UofA #59 and ASU #65. If your situation requires something better, you are looking at big bucks for out of state tuition elsewhere. Not a deal breaker, I guess, but having paid for four years out of state tuition at Berkeley, I can tell you that it is a significant cost.
 
Old 04-20-2012, 12:34 PM
 
1,232 posts, read 1,252,555 times
Reputation: 619
A bachelors from respected schools like ASU, NAU and UA is usually plenty respectable. It's when you get into grad degrees that employers start caring more about the top ranked schools, if you ask me. From a financial standpoint, I don't think the 5X-ish cost of out-of-state for a top ranked school is a wise investment, for most undergrad degrees where in-state schools are respectable.

It's not really "you get what you pay for". When you go in-state, the taxpayers pay the bulk of your costs. When you go out of state, you pay it all. In both cases, the actual cost is similar.
 
Old 04-20-2012, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Avondale and Tempe, Arizona
1,562 posts, read 1,368,309 times
Reputation: 1215
A pro would be the newness of just about everything, hardly anything is outdated, rusted out, or in shambles like in parts of the midwest and east.

Another pro is having everything in a close distance, shopping, restaurants, and entertainment are just a short drive from most everything.

A con would be the summertime heat, especially when it starts up early in April and doesn't end until November.

Another con is the heavy crush hour traffic.

The biggest con of all is the right-wing politics, not so much the people themselves but the elected officials, most of them seem to have their own looney agenda and it's a huge embarrassment.
 
Old 04-20-2012, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Willo Historic District, Phoenix, AZ
1,498 posts, read 1,618,345 times
Reputation: 1363
Quote:
Originally Posted by ReadyFreddy View Post
A bachelors from respected schools like ASU, NAU and UA is usually plenty respectable. It's when you get into grad degrees that employers start caring more about the top ranked schools, if you ask me. From a financial standpoint, I don't think the 5X-ish cost of out-of-state for a top ranked school is a wise investment, for most undergrad degrees where in-state schools are respectable.

It's not really "you get what you pay for". When you go in-state, the taxpayers pay the bulk of your costs. When you go out of state, you pay it all. In both cases, the actual cost is similar.
Not saying that the Arizona schools don't meet a lot of people's needs, but in the cases where they don't, you might be better off living someplace else, or at least factoring the additional cost into your decision of where to live.
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