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Old 04-21-2012, 09:34 AM
 
Location: In an alternate universe according to some, AKA Aspergers
10,746 posts, read 11,926,177 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ReadyFreddy View Post
I live on the edge of nowhere and I've never once worried. But my dogs are 80 lbs. each.

Your's are cutie patooties, jess.

I've never heard of issues from bird feeders.
With bigger dogs while Coyotes may not be an issue Javelinas are. Did some reading up on 'em recently and it seems their biggest enemy is a dog (and of course humans). Granted Javelinas can't jump fences but can/might attack if you run into 'em while out walking your pet.
The biggest thing I will keep saying is be aware of your surroundings. When living in the mountains we'd never think of strolling through the woods without being prepared and aware that we might run into bears,big cats,elk,moose etc. all which can put some serious hurt on you.
Same with the desert and it's critters, they're just smaller.
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Old 04-21-2012, 10:19 AM
 
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I've never heard of javelinas in Mesa but I've heard people in Fountain Hills have seen them walk into the grocery stores.
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Old 04-21-2012, 09:27 PM
 
Location: 38,000 feet
2,750 posts, read 2,498,025 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kdog View Post
Actually, that's either a coopers hawk, or it's smaller cousin, the sharp shinned hawk.
thanks KDog - I've been trying to figure it out. That's a long range picture, so it's hard to tell from it how big it was, but it stood at least 18" to 2 ft. tall. It was a biiiig sucker. My dogs wouldn't go near that part of my back yard for months. And it kept those dang gray pigeons out of the yard for awhile, too Lots of cool birds in my yard.
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Old 04-22-2012, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Hard aground in the Sonoran Desert
3,010 posts, read 3,022,959 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kdog View Post
Raptors kill prey much larger than themselves all the time. They'll gorge themselves on the spot instead of carrying it away.

Here's a harris hawk taking down a rabbit much larger and heavier than itself.
That's a passive rabbit, not another carnivore that will fight back. That is the reason raptors go after passive prey and don't attack wolves, bears, cougars, dogs, etc. on a regular basis because they would become the prey.
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Old 04-22-2012, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Orange County, CA
3,716 posts, read 2,908,777 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by motormaker View Post
Oh yes they can. This was in Scottsdale.
Have viewed the video carefully three times, and that wall is nowhere close to being 6 feet high. It is chest high on an averge sized adult male, which would make it 4 or perhaps 4 1/2 feet high at the most. Six feet would be pretty tough for a coyote to clear, although a bobcat or even a domestic cat would manage it easily.

Moderator cut: snip

Last edited by Kimballette; 04-22-2012 at 12:52 PM.. Reason: off topic
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Old 04-22-2012, 12:12 PM
 
Location: the AZ desert
5,040 posts, read 3,809,755 times
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We're not in Goodyear, but we never let our two 20-lb. dogs out unattended. Ever. (Block fence and all.) We're not overly paranoid, it's just something we got used to. Open the door to let them out and simply walk out with them.

Moderator cut: snip

Last edited by Kimballette; 04-22-2012 at 12:54 PM.. Reason: off topic
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Old 04-22-2012, 12:35 PM
 
Location: The Circle City. Sometimes NE of Bagdad.
12,176 posts, read 10,792,688 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackShoe View Post
Have viewed the video carefully three times, and that wall is nowhere close to being 6 feet high. It is chest high on an averge sized adult male, which would make it 4 or perhaps 4 1/2 feet high at the most. Six feet would be pretty tough for a coyote to clear, although a bobcat or even a domestic cat would manage it easily.
As stated in post 16, 6ft. fences are the norm in the valley. The coyote just measured the height of the fence much like a cat does, then put enough effort into it to get to the top of the fence.

Coyotes are 18" to 21" tall, it looks like 6" to me (or pretty close) in the video with him standing next to the fence.
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Old 04-22-2012, 02:02 PM
 
1,232 posts, read 1,472,319 times
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It looked like maybe 4-5' fence to me, based on the curb seen at the beginning and the buildings behind it. It looked like it might separate an apt. complex grounds from a street? They do build lower walls, and back in the 60s/70s, I think about 4' was the norm, even around peoples' back yards. A lot of those have had rows of blocks added to make them 6' now.

I kind of thought, too, the view panels would make the coyote more likely to go over it. He's seen what is (and isn't) on the other side.
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Old 04-22-2012, 10:03 PM
 
Location: 38,000 feet
2,750 posts, read 2,498,025 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackShoe View Post
Have viewed the video carefully three times, and that wall is nowhere close to being 6 feet high. It is chest high on an averge sized adult male, which would make it 4 or perhaps 4 1/2 feet high at the most. Six feet would be pretty tough for a coyote to clear, although a bobcat or even a domestic cat would manage it easily.

Moderator cut: snip
The point is not whether or not we know the exact height of that wall. The point is that coyotes CAN jump over the average wall in the valley. The fact that we aren't sure about the height of that wall does not make it impossible for a coyote to make it over a 6 foot wall. As i said, my neighbor and I have 6 feet block walls, and a coyote DID get over his wall. Which means, a coyote CAN jump over a 6 foot wall.

And it's not just about "jumping" - they can run up the side of the wall and go over as we saw in that video.

More information supporting this:
How high a fence can a large coyote jump over? | Answerbag
Coyote or coyotes wildlife information FAQ - DesertUSA
http://www.coyoteroller.com

It seems pointless to argue about the exact height when we want to help a new person to the desert protect her precious pets. Everyone's message is the same - they CAN jump, they MIGHT hurt your pets, it's SMART to be mindful of that and take the proper precautions.
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Old 04-22-2012, 10:12 PM
 
Location: Sonoran Desert
17,597 posts, read 20,934,868 times
Reputation: 9232
Quote:
Originally Posted by R_Cowgirl View Post
The point is not whether or not we know the exact height of that wall. The point is that coyotes CAN jump over the average wall in the valley. The fact that we aren't sure about the height of that wall does not make it impossible for a coyote to make it over a 6 foot wall. As i said, my neighbor and I have 6 feet block walls, and a coyote DID get over his wall. Which means, a coyote CAN jump over a 6 foot wall.

And it's not just about "jumping" - they can run up the side of the wall and go over as we saw in that video.

More information supporting this:
How high a fence can a large coyote jump over? | Answerbag
Coyote or coyotes wildlife information FAQ - DesertUSA
http://www.coyoteroller.com

It seems pointless to argue about the exact height when we want to help a new person to the desert protect her precious pets. Everyone's message is the same - they CAN jump, they MIGHT hurt your pets, it's SMART to be mindful of that and take the proper precautions.
Nonetheless, I don't think we should be conflating possibility with probability. While coyotes may well be able to leap tall walls in a single bound and gobble up Fufu, the anecdotal instances of this happening are so rare as to be hard for many to believe. It certainly is not a common experience. I have lived on desert preserves for most of my four decades in Phoenix. Coyotes would howl on the slopes and we frequently would see them, but none scaled my walls and ate my cats. I believe there are wall mounted coyote guards available for those who worry.
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