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Old 05-27-2008, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
13,115 posts, read 13,636,042 times
Reputation: 4820
Quote:
Originally Posted by fcorrales80 View Post
The Morrison Institute and Urban Land, and other non-partisan, non- financially backed research groups have Houston's oil and fuel industry in the mid 50 percentile for the economy. Your reference of 40% is most accurate for Dallas-Ft. Worth, not Houston.
I got my source from the actual Houston government website and a poster on HAIF discussing that very same topic.
Also that picture that you mentioned earlier was fog and was pointed out by a person that actually took the picture on SSP.

 
Old 05-27-2008, 03:57 PM
 
Location: Houston, Tx
771 posts, read 1,613,718 times
Reputation: 571
Smile hey 50% of jobs related to Energy

Quote:
Originally Posted by fcorrales80 View Post
The Morrison Institute and Urban Land, and other non-partisan, non- financially backed research groups have Houston's oil and fuel industry in the mid 50 percentile for the economy. Your reference of 40% is most accurate for Dallas-Ft. Worth, not Houston.
Hey thats great because people will always need energy. Its a good thing that we aren't depending so much on the housing market like Phoenix. Even if oil went down to $75 a barrel we would still be growing.
 
Old 05-27-2008, 03:59 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
4,000 posts, read 5,920,212 times
Reputation: 853
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd433 View Post
I don't underdstand why since this country doesn't grow because of the people that are already here. It tends to grow from foreign migration and birth rate.

Please understand that if people move to Phoenix from another state then the country still has the same amount of people (there is no real population growth) and these people have left a hole in the place they left behind.

But in the case of Houston the growth comes from foreign migration and birth rate this is real population growth. In other words when Houston grows in population the wole country grows.

What? What do they have in the water in Houston. Again another off base post. While the population in Phoenix grows from California, Illinois, and the Northeast, the population in those places are replaced by other Americans and foreigners. L.A. County, Orange County, and San Diego have had people move to Phoenix, but they are still among growing counties with population gains.

The whole country and every region are still growing. Even the Detroit metro region is growing. While the city of Detroit has shrunk, the metro region has gained in population attainment.
 
Old 05-27-2008, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
4,000 posts, read 5,920,212 times
Reputation: 853
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd433 View Post
Hey thats great because people will always need energy. Its a good thing that we aren't depending so much on the housing market like Phoenix. Even if oil went down to $75 a barrel we would still be growing.
They will need energy, but not in the form of polluting petrochemicals and dwindling supplies of oil. New and clean sources are the future. Every nation, including China and the U.S. will need to elminate oil as a main source of energy. China wishes to use less oil and "try" to use clean-coal power stations because of the pollution in every city in China...they are starting to look like the smog in Houston and L.A.
 
Old 05-27-2008, 04:06 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,457 posts, read 13,538,197 times
Reputation: 4397
Quote:
Originally Posted by miamiman View Post
Phoenix may not PHYSICALLY be on the West Coast, but IMO is a West Coast city.

Phoenix has more in common with Los Angeles and San Diego than it does with Albuquerque or El Paso.

The materialism, the size of the metro area, the work ethic, the laid back, but fast-paced nature, the fact that a very high percentage of Valley residents were Californians, the smog, the freeway culture, and the business connection to Southern California, the fact that ASU is a PAC-10 school, etc. are all reasons why Phoenix could be classified as a West Coast city.
Freeway "culture"? You consider freeways a "culture"? Materialism? smog? Those don't sound like great things to me. If Phoenix really is a "west coast" city, it's a "west coast" city in all the wrong ways. BTW, have you ever been to Albuquerque? It's a really unique city and has more local culture and a sense of place than Phoenix could ever dream of, despite being 1/5 the size. Phoenix could actually learn a thing or two from Albuquerque about culture. And see, the thing is, while people in Phoenix (moreso on this forum than in real life) like to compare themselves to southern California and think they're "west coast," most people on the west coast could care less about Phoenix, if they have even heard of the place. People from Phoenix like going to San Diego all the time, but I've never heard San Diegans say they can't wait to take trips to Phoenix. The truth is, when Phoenix tries to compare itself to the "west coast," it loses. When you look at it in terms of the desert southwest, Phoenix emerges as the largest city in the region. And when I spent almost a week in LA a few months ago on my apartment hunting trip, LA didn't remind me of Phoenix one bit. The endless San Gabriel Valley (leaving aside Pasadena) and Riverside and San Bernardino counties kind of reminded me of Phoenix.

Actually, LA reminded me a lot more of Denver (the core, central city, not the suburbs) than it reminded me of anything in Phoenix. Santa Monica reminded me a lot of Boulder. San Diego in terms of landscape and urban geography reminds me a lot of Colorado Springs and suburban communities outside of Denver in the foothills (Castle Rock, etc). There are a ton of ex-Californians moving there too; Phoenix isn't the only place where Californians are moving to. I've talked to a lot of ex-Californians on these message boards in different forums and many of them would never even dream of moving to Phoenix. It's only a certain type of Californian that prefers Phoenix. Anyway, once I'm in LA (moving in a few weeks), going to USC, I'll report back.
 
Old 05-27-2008, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Western Chicagoland
18,533 posts, read 48,504,954 times
Reputation: 7281
Alright, which one of you arseholes just signed in under a new name (KeyserSoze) and bashed me in a PM? Seriously, get a life. I have my opinion about things, same as you.
 
Old 05-27-2008, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
4,000 posts, read 5,920,212 times
Reputation: 853
Quote:
Originally Posted by vegaspilgrim View Post
Freeway "culture"? You consider freeways a "culture"? Materialism? smog? Those don't sound like great things to me. If Phoenix really is a "west coast" city, it's a "west coast" city in all the wrong ways. BTW, have you ever been to Albuquerque? It's a really unique city and has more local culture and a sense of place than Phoenix could ever dream of, despite being 1/5 the size. Phoenix could actually learn a thing or two from Albuquerque about culture. And see, the thing is, while people in Phoenix (moreso on this forum than in real life) like to compare themselves to southern California and think they're "west coast," most people on the west coast could care less about Phoenix, if they have even heard of the place. People from Phoenix like going to San Diego all the time, but I've never heard San Diegans say they can't wait to take trips to Phoenix. The truth is, when Phoenix tries to compare itself to the "west coast," it loses. When you look at it in terms of the desert southwest, Phoenix emerges as the largest city in the region. And when I spent almost a week in LA a few months ago on my apartment hunting trip, LA didn't remind me of Phoenix one bit. The endless San Gabriel Valley (leaving aside Pasadena) and Riverside and San Bernardino counties kind of reminded me of Phoenix.

Actually, LA reminded me a lot more of Denver (the core, central city, not the suburbs) than it reminded me of anything in Phoenix. Santa Monica reminded me a lot of Boulder. San Diego in terms of landscape and urban geography reminds me a lot of Colorado Springs and suburban communities outside of Denver in the foothills (Castle Rock, etc). There are a ton of ex-Californians moving there too; Phoenix isn't the only place where Californians are moving to. I've talked to a lot of ex-Californians on these message boards in different forums and many of them would never even dream of moving to Phoenix. It's only a certain type of Californian that prefers Phoenix. Anyway, once I'm in LA (moving in a few weeks), going to USC, I'll report back.
Another opinionated, non-factually based post. I work with actual data and none of your assertions are founded. I did my undergrad at USC! I wish I would have gone to UCLA, but it was a great experience. Enjoyed my time at Columbia University more.

More info about So. Cali and Houston: one reason why Phoenix does not want to be another L.A. People leave L.A. because Phoenix is something different, not more of the same.

Top 10 most polluted US cities
(By ozone)
1) Los Angeles, California
2) Bakersfield, California
3) Visalia/Porterville, California
4) Houston, Texas
5) Fresno/Madera, California
6) Sacramento, California
7) Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas
8) New York City/Newark, New Jersey
9) Baltimore, Maryland./Washington, DC
10) Baton Rouge, Louisiana

The link: City Mayors: The most polluted US cities

Last edited by fcorrales80; 05-27-2008 at 05:04 PM..
 
Old 05-27-2008, 04:24 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
4,000 posts, read 5,920,212 times
Reputation: 853
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
I got my source from the actual Houston government website and a poster on HAIF discussing that very same topic.
Also that picture that you mentioned earlier was fog and was pointed out by a person that actually took the picture on SSP.
Fog isn't brown. And Houston is the second most ozone polluted metro region after the L.A. area.

City Mayors: The most polluted US cities

The Houston Government is partisan and has a direct financial incentive to inflate numbers that are positive indicators and deflate numbers that are negative. Every city does this and that is exactly why non-partisan institutions are accurate and reliable.
 
Old 05-27-2008, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Houston, Tx
771 posts, read 1,613,718 times
Reputation: 571
Smile Alternative Energy

Quote:
Originally Posted by fcorrales80 View Post
They will need energy, but not in the form of polluting petrochemicals and dwindling supplies of oil. New and clean sources are the future. Every nation, including China and the U.S. will need to elminate oil as a main source of energy. China wishes to use less oil and "try" to use clean-coal power stations because of the pollution in every city in China...they are starting to look like the smog in Houston and L.A.
I agree that the world will turn to alternative energy that is why I stress that Houston is the Energy capital not the oil capital. As the Energy demands change so will the energy companies that are already here. People tend to forget that the same companies that produce oil are the ones who are investing the most into alternatives also. They are not just going to go away when the oil runs out. The idea is energy not just oil. Right now there is a big focus on oil but that is because the demand for oil is high but when demand decreases the Energy companies will change. Don't you think they are intelligent enough to figure this out?? I guarantee you that nobody understands that oil will go away one day better than the oil companies. These huge fortune 500 companies have the intelligence and foresight to make adjustments cot just go away.
 
Old 05-27-2008, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Houston, Tx
771 posts, read 1,613,718 times
Reputation: 571
Smile Phoenix is polluted as well

Quote:
Originally Posted by fcorrales80 View Post
Fog isn't brown. And Houston is the second most ozone polluted metro region after the L.A. area.

City Mayors: The most polluted US cities

The Houston Government is partisan and has a direct financial incentive to inflate numbers that are positive indicators and deflate numbers that are negative. Every city does this and that is exactly why non-partisan institutions are accurate and reliable.
Hey I used to live in Phoenix and believe me there is a brown haze in Phoenix as well. I think it's mostly particulates but it is pollution. I know that the mountains in the distance are obscured by pollution.
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