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Old 04-18-2013, 09:16 PM
 
Location: Rust'n in Tustin
781 posts, read 823,383 times
Reputation: 1058

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Yep, that's what I thought too.
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Old 04-18-2013, 11:14 PM
 
2,920 posts, read 1,941,172 times
Reputation: 2753
Hmmmm I guess I should look at that. Our rental house is in the same city and doesn't have a pool fence.
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Old 04-18-2013, 11:18 PM
 
2,920 posts, read 1,941,172 times
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Per Scottsdale it seems we do need a pool fence. It must not be enforced since many of the homes we looked at did not have pool fences.

Scottsdale’s current swimming pool barrier requirements apply to all single-family residential swimming pools, spas and hot tubs constructed after July 20, 1995. There are no exemptions for households without children.
Swimming Pools, Hot Tubs & Spas must conform to the 2006 International Building Code. The purpose of these requirements is to provide an integrated level of protection against potential swimming pool drownings through the use of physical barriers and warning devices. It is not intended as a substitute for adult supervision of children.
The current requirements for new swimming pools include a fence that separates the pool from OTHER property (commonly a perimeter fence, located on the property line) that is at least 60” (5’-0”) high; and a barrier which separates the pool from the house on the SAME property, which may be a fence 48” high.
Since the requirements are not retroactive, pools constructed prior to July 15, 1992, need only comply with the 54” perimeter yard fencing and gate requirement in effect at the time. Pools constructed from July 15, 1992, until July 20, 1995, must meet the current requirements, except perimeter fence height, which was 54” (4’-6”) at the time.
It is the responsibility of the pool builder to inform the new pool owner of the barrier requirements. It is the responsibility of the property owner or any other person in charge of a swimming pool to ensure that the required swimming pool barrier, including gates, doors, alarms, locks and / or latches are maintained in safe and good working order at all times.
These pool safety provisions are based upon nationally established standards and are designed to assist homeowners in the supervision of their pools for current or future use by children. We feel they offer reasonable opportunities for Scottsdale homeowners to provide for adequate pool safety by integrating various components of barrier protection.
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Old 04-18-2013, 11:23 PM
 
502 posts, read 643,679 times
Reputation: 494
Here in Chandler I've just removed a large pool fence. It was an eyesore, and didn't enclose the whole pool anyway.

I broke a few spanners trying to get the steel poles up, and eventually finished the job using a huge pipe wrench from Home Depot. I still bear the scars

I was also wondering who might want the fencing. Some of it is rusted through. I was thinking of putting it on Craigslist for collection, because I don't want to saw it down into transportable bits. I've spent enough time on it already
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Old 04-19-2013, 09:39 AM
 
2,920 posts, read 1,941,172 times
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In case anyone else reads this I want to clarify my previous response. It appears in the state of AZ, without children under 6 living in the house, no additional barrier between the house and pool is necessary. In Scottsdale, it is, regardless of children. There are however, exceptions if the exterior to the house itself is the barrier. It seems you can go without a pool fence provided the door to the pool are meets the following requirements.

AG105.2.8 Dwelling wall as a barrier.
Where a wall of a dwelling serves as part of the barrier, one of the following shall apply:
1.Doors with direct access to the pool through that wall shall be equipped with an alarm that produces an audible warning when the door and/or its screen, if present, are opened, according to the following procedure:
a.The alarm shall activate within 7 seconds and sound continuously for a minimum of 30 seconds.
b.Be heard throughout the house during normal household activities with a sound pressure level of not less than 85 dba when measured indoors at 10 feet (3048 mm).
c.Reset automatically reset under all conditions.
Should the door remain open after the alarm has reset, it shall repeat a, b and c above until the door, and/or it's screen, if present, are closed.
The alarm shall be equipped with a manual means, such as touchpad or switch, to temporarily deactivate the alarm for a single opening. Such deactivation shall last for not more than 15 seconds. Doors that remain open after 15 seconds shall activate the alarm as outlined in a, b and c above. This action will continuously repeat until the door, and/or it's screen, if present, are closed.
The alarm shall not be equipped with an on/off switch of any type other than the temporary deactivation switch.
The alarm shall be listed in accordance with UL 2017. In dwellings not required to be Accessible, Type A or Type B units, the deactivation switch shall be located 54 inches (1372 mm) or more above the threshold of the door. In dwellings required to be Accessible, Type A or Type B units, the deactivation switch(es) shall be located at 54 inches (1372 mm) maximum and 48 inches minimum above the threshold of the door.
2.The pool shall be equipped with a power safety cover that complies with ASTM F 1346.
3.Other means of protection, such as self-closing doors with self-latching devices located a minimum of 54 inches (1372 mm) above the threshold, which are approved by the administrative authority, shall be accepted so long as the degree of protection afforded is not less than the protection afforded by Section 3109.4.1.8, Item 1 or 2.
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Old 04-19-2013, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Phoenix AZ
3,369 posts, read 4,191,842 times
Reputation: 4038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guitarmaan View Post
Here in Chandler I've just removed a large pool fence. It was an eyesore, and didn't enclose the whole pool anyway.

I broke a few spanners trying to get the steel poles up, and eventually finished the job using a huge pipe wrench from Home Depot. I still bear the scars

I was also wondering who might want the fencing. Some of it is rusted through. I was thinking of putting it on Craigslist for collection, because I don't want to saw it down into transportable bits. I've spent enough time on it already
post a pic of it on Craigslist on a Saturday morning as "free steel".. , but do *not* post your phone number..

put in the ad that you will call the *first* person to respond and they will have XX hours to remove all of it or you will start calling down the list until it is all gone.

When I post free metal, I usually get half a dozen responses within an hour. Just be firm, you will not "hold" it, you will not help load, and you will not supply any tools..
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Old 04-19-2013, 11:36 AM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
5,363 posts, read 7,535,067 times
Reputation: 21201
I wouldn't cut the posts off at the ground. That could be a little dangerous later on. You still have that concrete, which some could still be above ground, even a little bit. Then, when you cut the posts there's a possibility of a jagged piece or two of the steel post. Think of kids playing in the area and if they happen to fall on where the post was. The concrete and the hole in the center of the post could be painful! If you happen to know someone with a tractor you need to wrap a chain around the post, dig a little dirt from around the concrete, and pull it up with the tractor. Jut keep extra dirt to fill in the holes. This may take a little longer, but think it will be safer in the long run.
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Old 04-19-2013, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Mesa, AZ
192 posts, read 113,608 times
Reputation: 416
Quote:
Originally Posted by kygman View Post
I wouldn't cut the posts off at the ground. That could be a little dangerous later on. You still have that concrete, which some could still be above ground, even a little bit. Then, when you cut the posts there's a possibility of a jagged piece or two of the steel post. Think of kids playing in the area and if they happen to fall on where the post was. The concrete and the hole in the center of the post could be painful! If you happen to know someone with a tractor you need to wrap a chain around the post, dig a little dirt from around the concrete, and pull it up with the tractor. Jut keep extra dirt to fill in the holes. This may take a little longer, but think it will be safer in the long run.
Agreed - it's honestly not that hard to do, assuming yours is concreted in like ours. Cut the panels off alongside the post, then loosen around the concrete and use the post as leverage/ stick a bar under it and push. Our concrete lumps are about twice the size of a football, so fairly easy to lever using the 6ft steel post that's attached to it (says the person who's not actually doing it herself ). I think cutting it off at ground level would be harder, more likely to result in gashing your own leg, and be nigh on impossible not to leave a jagged stump sticking up.

Manually cutting through two panels and removing the post in-between from the ground takes hubby about 15-20 mins, so it's that sort of scale of job. Do a little at the time, and fling yourself in the pool between saws, for cooling!
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Old 04-19-2013, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Phoenix AZ
3,369 posts, read 4,191,842 times
Reputation: 4038
I once used a rented "engine crane" to pull cemented fenceposts out of the ground.. soak the ground slowly for a day beforehand, then dig around the cement until you can wrap the ball of cement with a chain.. then hoist away!..
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Old 04-19-2013, 04:48 PM
 
502 posts, read 643,679 times
Reputation: 494
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zippyman View Post
post a pic of it on Craigslist on a Saturday morning as "free steel".. , but do *not* post your phone number..

put in the ad that you will call the *first* person to respond and they will have XX hours to remove all of it or you will start calling down the list until it is all gone.

When I post free metal, I usually get half a dozen responses within an hour. Just be firm, you will not "hold" it, you will not help load, and you will not supply any tools..
Thanks, I'll try that.
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