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Old 07-02-2013, 09:05 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
76 posts, read 74,670 times
Reputation: 75

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Watermelon!! It's about 90% water!
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Old 07-02-2013, 10:19 PM
 
368 posts, read 209,251 times
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Thanks, everyone. I just got up and got a drink of water.
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Old 07-03-2013, 02:10 AM
 
Location: USA
3,971 posts, read 6,244,442 times
Reputation: 2105
Quote:
Originally Posted by phx1205 View Post
Just drinking water is not enough if you are outside in the heat. You also need to replace the nutrients that you lose in your sweat that regulate important interal processes including potassium, sodium and calcium. If you are sweating quite a bit, you need to mix in a Gatorade type drink as well.
Bingo. When it was 120 I had to do 1/2 power aid, 1/2 water.
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Old 07-03-2013, 02:19 AM
 
9,183 posts, read 10,056,977 times
Reputation: 6809
Quote:
Originally Posted by phx1205 View Post
Just drinking water is not enough if you are outside in the heat. You also need to replace the nutrients that you lose in your sweat that regulate important interal processes including potassium, sodium and calcium. If you are sweating quite a bit, you need to mix in a Gatorade type drink as well.
This is not quite true and is a popular myth.

Let's remember why Gatorade was created in the first place. Back in the day, athletes would only drink water. They were not eating. They were on the field for hours. So they came up with a simple yet brilliant idea, the sports drink. The glucose (sugar) provides instant energy while the electrolytes (sodium, potassium, chloride) replenishes that which was lost through sweating. So the idea was to provide a drink which could enhance their performance and preventing cramping from loss of electrolytes. They were not designed to replace water. They were designed to enhance the current regimen of drinking a lot of plain water ie throw in a sports drink along with drinking water.

So yes, for your athlete who is competing for hours, is not eating and is sweating profusely, a sports drink is a good idea. But even these guys are drinking mostly water and throwing in an occasional sports drink or two.

For your average citizen who is just trying to hydrate, the last thing you want to do is drink a lot of sports drinks. The high carb and glucose contents will make you more thirsty and could dehydrate you more. You are not going to lose electrolytes because you are consuming regular meals. Trust me, the food you eat has way more electrolytes than these sports drinks; check out how much potassium one banana has as an example. And in terms of sodium...please, one tablespoon of soy sauce has a 1gram of sodium, one ketchup packet has 300 mg of sodium. People with high blood pressure are advised to consume 2 grams of sodium or less PER DAY. So trust me, we all get enough sodium in our diet per day. You just need to drink plain water. This electrolyte loss aspect has been successfully played up and exaggerated by the makers of those products. You are not going to need Gatorades or Power-Aids because you walked outside your house.

Last edited by azriverfan.; 07-03-2013 at 02:59 AM..
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Old 07-03-2013, 07:41 AM
 
Location: USA
3,971 posts, read 6,244,442 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by azriverfan. View Post
For your average citizen who is just trying to hydrate, the last thing you want to do is drink a lot of sports drinks. You are not going to need Gatorades or Power-Aids because you walked outside your house.
Based on your paragraph the only people that should drink sports drinks are people vigorously moving. Would moving in the middle of July count towards needing a sports drink?

When I am outside longer then an hour I drink water like a camel and the only way to get rid of that thirsty feeling is a watered down sports drink. I know for a fact I passed out one time because I couldn't get hydrated because of water alone. No extreme physical activity here.
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Old 07-03-2013, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Southeast Valley
1,049 posts, read 1,602,795 times
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Coconut water is supposed to be great for hydration: Coconut water nutrition facts and health benefits

There is a sandwich board sign on Gilbert Rd, just south of Baseline that says, "IV Hydration" - I have always been curious about that. Does anyone know anything about it?
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Old 07-03-2013, 10:38 AM
 
2,358 posts, read 2,945,310 times
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Here's a tip for you, most serious athletes do not consume Gatorade or Powerade. Over the years I have done running races, bicycle races, hardcore hikes like Rim to Rim and such. The people that do stuff like this rarely drink the mass produced sugar based drinks (at 34 grams of sugar a serving that's more than most sodas, Mountain Dew has 31 grams of sugar per serving). Even the athletes that are sponsored by Gatorade usually have something other than Gatorade in their water bottle.

Most of my sports partners and friends hydrate mostly with water. So if I'm out for a long day on the trail I will take 64-100 oz's of water and 24 oz's of water mixed with electrolytes. You can buy electrolyte tablets to drop in your water bottle at any sporting goods store and most grocery stores.

That's the dirty little secret behind mass produced sports drinks and sports bars. In order to appeal to the mass market they have turned what used to be a true sports supplement into glorified soda and candy bars. Your average PowerBar has almost as much sugar as a Snickers bar.
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Old 07-03-2013, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
196 posts, read 143,856 times
Reputation: 392
Quote:
Originally Posted by azriverfan. View Post
This is not quite true and is a popular myth.

Let's remember why Gatorade was created in the first place. Back in the day, athletes would only drink water. They were not eating. They were on the field for hours. So they came up with a simple yet brilliant idea, the sports drink. The glucose (sugar) provides instant energy while the electrolytes (sodium, potassium, chloride) replenishes that which was lost through sweating. So the idea was to provide a drink which could enhance their performance and preventing cramping from loss of electrolytes. They were not designed to replace water. They were designed to enhance the current regimen of drinking a lot of plain water ie throw in a sports drink along with drinking water.

So yes, for your athlete who is competing for hours, is not eating and is sweating profusely, a sports drink is a good idea. But even these guys are drinking mostly water and throwing in an occasional sports drink or two.

For your average citizen who is just trying to hydrate, the last thing you want to do is drink a lot of sports drinks. The high carb and glucose contents will make you more thirsty and could dehydrate you more. You are not going to lose electrolytes because you are consuming regular meals. Trust me, the food you eat has way more electrolytes than these sports drinks; check out how much potassium one banana has as an example. And in terms of sodium...please, one tablespoon of soy sauce has a 1gram of sodium, one ketchup packet has 300 mg of sodium. People with high blood pressure are advised to consume 2 grams of sodium or less PER DAY. So trust me, we all get enough sodium in our diet per day. You just need to drink plain water. This electrolyte loss aspect has been successfully played up and exaggerated by the makers of those products. You are not going to need Gatorades or Power-Aids because you walked outside your house.
I should have said "outside in the heat for an extended period of time". The OP was asking how to stay hydrated and if the OP is new to the heat, they need to know it's not a myth that you need to replace the electrolytes you lose in your sweat.
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Old 07-03-2013, 01:47 PM
RCR
 
Location: Chandler
259 posts, read 541,422 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhureeKeeper View Post
Thanks, everyone. I just got up and got a drink of water.

Oh yeah, well I just got up and took a leak....
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Old 07-03-2013, 04:12 PM
 
9,183 posts, read 10,056,977 times
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To answer the OP's question, it's simple drink enough water. Now you might say "I do drink a lot of water" Well, the reality is you probably don't. Most people require between 2 to 3 Liters of water per day. In the Arizona summers, you are probably looking at closer to 2.5-4 liters depending on your size and physical activity. That is 2-3 large coke bottles full of water per day! Most of us probably drink between 1-2 liters per day. A safe number is 3 liters in the summer. Aside from urinating and sweating, you lose a lot of water through insensible water loss meaning water that is lost through the skin transdermally and then evaporates. You also lose a lot of water through respiration. Now add the heat and a dry climate and you can see where I'm getting at.

Of course there are exceptions, I don't want someone with congestive heart failure just drinking away meanwhile they develop pulmonary edema. Check with your physician before knowing how much to drink but the above guidelines apply to people who are generally healthy and will not suffer from fluid overload.


Quote:
Originally Posted by phx1205 View Post
I should have said "outside in the heat for an extended period of time". The OP was asking how to stay hydrated and if the OP is new to the heat, they need to know it's not a myth that you need to replace the electrolytes you lose in your sweat.
It's not a myth that you need to replace electrolytes through sweating. It is a myth that you need a sports drink to do so. The food that you consume has plenty of electrolytes. You don't need to drink gatorade. You can do just fine by drinking water and having a snack like some fruit with mixed nuts or any meal. In fact, most people are unaware that they can make their own sports drink at home with basic ingredients like water, sugar and salt. The impression that we are receiving from the OP undergoes routine physical activity and feels dehydrated and wants to know how to hydrate properly. He or she is not saying they are active outdoors for hours at a time. That's why context is important when answering these questions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by shiphead View Post
Based on your paragraph the only people that should drink sports drinks are people vigorously moving. Would moving in the middle of July count towards needing a sports drink? When I am outside longer then an hour I drink water like a camel and the only way to get rid of that thirsty feeling is a watered down sports drink. I know for a fact I passed out one time because I couldn't get hydrated because of water alone. No extreme physical activity here.
Just use common sense. Sure if you are working out or are in the heat for an extended period of time, one sports drink is not a bad idea. However, people often mistake drinking one sports drink for substituting it for water. You don't want to pour an entire thermos full of Gatorade or drink several cups of Gatorade versus drinking several cups of water. The glucose/carb that they put in there will actually make you more thirsty and dehydrate you more.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AZ Tracy View Post
Coconut water is supposed to be great for hydration: Coconut water nutrition facts and health benefits

There is a sandwich board sign on Gilbert Rd, just south of Baseline that says, "IV Hydration" - I have always been curious about that. Does anyone know anything about it?

It's a gimic. You don't need it. It's a money maker for a lot of providers. Most of the people who provide this are not physicians. They charge cash since it's not covered by insurance. I know some naturopaths who do it. They usually charge $50 to $100 for a 1 Liter bag of IV Normal Saline. They might even throw some B12 and Vitamin C in for good measure. Sure, you will feel great as does anyone who receives a bag of saline considering nearly all of us are dehydrated to some degree. It won't hurt you and if you can afford to do so, be my guest. You will feel better. Just know that bag of saline probably costs them $5 or less so they are making a considerable amount of money off you.

Last edited by azriverfan.; 07-03-2013 at 04:26 PM..
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