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Old 08-17-2010, 12:52 AM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
5,109 posts, read 3,941,034 times
Reputation: 5117

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Quote:
Originally Posted by roosevelt View Post
The VNB built the geodesic dome and who knows where it went to.
Attachment 66914
I thought it was VNB but didn't remember for sure. I guess it's gone too? Boy, nothing ever stays the same, does it??
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Old 08-17-2010, 12:54 AM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
5,109 posts, read 3,941,034 times
Reputation: 5117
Quote:
Originally Posted by baby sinister View Post
I never really considered Pete's to have great tasting food...If you wanted fish and didn't have a lot of money, then they were the place to go. Now Knock Kneed Lobster on 32nd and Van Buren has some good fish. Yumm!
I guess...if I ever get back down to Phoenix...there are a LOT of new places to check out. Maybe after it cools off down there......like Thanksgiving!
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Old 08-17-2010, 05:27 AM
 
Location: South Tempe, AZ
14,224 posts, read 17,816,886 times
Reputation: 6400
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZDesertBrat View Post
I thought it was VNB but didn't remember for sure. I guess it's gone too? Boy, nothing ever stays the same, does it??
It was a Valley National Bank. ASU purchased it, used it for an info center for a time. When the building was demolished in 2007, the dome was removed, disassembled and put in storage. It is now back in use as a pavilion at the Vista del Sol housing/retail complex ASU built on the south side of Apache. Here it is now:

Week in Review: Oct. 19-25 | ASU News
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Old 08-17-2010, 08:13 AM
 
2,800 posts, read 454,091 times
Reputation: 728
lots of talk about Petes fish and chips, I wonder if anyone recalls Lazy Lous fish and chips? I remember one around 16 st. and Roosevelt.
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Old 08-17-2010, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Glendale, AZ.
155 posts, read 226,131 times
Reputation: 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Westside Willie View Post
Heres a shot of the Grand Canal where it intersects Central just South of Brophy/Xavier

Check out the vintage SRP "diamond" logo. cool.
Cool pic Wille! Haven't seen that in a coons age.
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Old 08-17-2010, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Glendale, AZ.
155 posts, read 226,131 times
Reputation: 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by slowesthand View Post
lots of talk about Petes fish and chips, I wonder if anyone recalls Lazy Lous fish and chips? I remember one around 16 st. and Roosevelt.

Yup, ate at Lazy Lou's many a time. Anyone remember Chat N Chew? Gosh, I believe it was located around maybe north of Thomas around 32nd St. ? They had an excellent BBQ pork or maybe beef sandwich. Any help on the location?
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Old 08-17-2010, 09:31 AM
 
Location: South Tempe, AZ
14,224 posts, read 17,816,886 times
Reputation: 6400
Quote:
Originally Posted by slowesthand View Post
lots of talk about Petes fish and chips, I wonder if anyone recalls Lazy Lous fish and chips? I remember one around 16 st. and Roosevelt.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Donalumni View Post
Yup, ate at Lazy Lou's many a time. Anyone remember Chat N Chew? Gosh, I believe it was located around maybe north of Thomas around 32nd St. ? They had an excellent BBQ pork or maybe beef sandwich. Any help on the location?
Lazy Lou's is still around, at a different location. www.lazylou.com
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Old 08-17-2010, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Glendale, AZ.
155 posts, read 226,131 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roosevelt View Post
I see the banks are still dirt with Johnson grass growing. There used to be a technique called moss cutting or something like that. There would be a horse on each side of the canal pulling a chain that dragged the bottom and sides of the canal cutting loose weeds, the weeds would then float down to a device that scooped up the debris.
I remember them doing that roosevelt. I lived in Yuma for 5 years selling Caterpillar there and sold the irrigation district there a couple of log skidders to pull an old anchor chain to do the same.
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Old 08-17-2010, 09:46 AM
 
Location: Glendale, AZ.
155 posts, read 226,131 times
Reputation: 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZDesertBrat View Post
That place fascinated me when I was a little kid. I thought Indians really lived there! lol I remember, in the late 60s, when a bank was built really close to there on Apache that was dome shaped. First building I ever saw like that. Further up the street was the Tempe Bowl where I once worked as a waitress in the restaurant. And where I learned to bowl too.
You probably remember the old ASU football stadium right there by the teepee hotel just west of it. I think the ASU swiiming stadium is there now. I was in Phoenix last week but didn't have much time to run around like I usually do to see what's changing.
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Old 08-17-2010, 11:13 AM
 
23 posts, read 39,900 times
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Quote:
"... I've been here since 1992 and didn't catch any of that, but things have changed a bit since I've been here.
The 101 was...well, there was no 101. The bridges for the overpasses were in place, but it was just dirt and Beardsley was the road that everyone used. There were some older houses north of Beardsley (101), but only between 35th Ave and say 7th St...nothing else was developed, it was just open desert. I remember the merchantile store at 91st Ave and Pinnacle Peak being in the middle of nowhere and it was sort of a half way point on the way to Lake Pleasant, a place you stopped to gas up and grab some snacks...now it's in the middle of everything.
I was born here in 1952 and I remember when the Westward Ho Hotel was the tallest building in town. Everything seemed like citrus groves and vacant lots. Sunnyslope was a separate city North of Phoenix, and there was nothing North of North Mountain but desert. Shea Boulevard was a dirt road on the way to the river. Cruising Central Avenue was a teenage past time, and the motor heads would pull up at the Carnation parking lot at Indian School Road and open the hood so everyone could see all the chrome do-dads and modifications to their engines. Bob's Big Boy at Thomas was the spot to go, though. Chery Coke wasn't a premixed drink then, they had to pour syrup in your glass. The car hops on roller skates seemed to almost fly to your car. At 7th Street and Missouri Rd. there was the Cinema Park drive in. The strip mall there now has the same name. The property developers put houses, apartments, and condos in most of the citrus groves and vacant lots. At 7th Street and E. Flynn Lane, South of Glendale Ave., there is a Flynn Lane Biltmore Condominiums. It was first a bunch of apartments and before that in the fifties, it was a large dirt lot with a Mexican family in what can only be described as a "shack" with chickens running around outside. I remember waking up to roosters crowing in the morning. Our house and yard was on the irrigation ditch, they were exposed along the streets and when it rained hard, someone would always drive in one. We used to play in the pipes that went under the streets and catch crayfish. We were practically in the desert so we always saw desert creatures. I found a scorpion in my bedroom when I was little. One of our neighbors was always killing rattle snakes in his yard. Phoenix was a nice place without much heavy traffic ever. They built the I-17 (Black Canyon Freeway) and the Guaratee Bank Building (United Bank) and now there are many buildings that tower over the Westward Ho. The Phoenix Indian School is now the Steele Park. Bob's and the Carnation Parking Lot aren't there anymore. The fancy restaurants when I was little were Neptune's Table at 7th Ave. and Camelback and Green Gable at 24th Street and Thomas, they are both gone. As a child, my dad knew Bob Gosnell, Sr. and we used to go to Green Gable with the knight in armor on a huge white horse that would direct you to your parking space. You can still take a tour of the San Carlos Hotel, that is full of history. The antique houses at Heritage Square and the Rosson House in particular, were originally condemned and scheduled for demolition. It was a women's auxillary who passed the petitions around to save them. They were condemned buildings downtown. J.C. Penny's, Korricks, Diamonds, and J.J. Newberry's were downtown. Park Central was the first mall in Phoenix. Durant's on Central was popular and Mexican food was sold by places like Macayo's and Jordan's. The Phoenix Country Club area was easy to drive through back then, we didn't even know what a gated community was. The car dealers didn't have to put chains on the driveways for and the vehicles all sat in the lot with the keys in them. (you can't do that anymore) You could leave a bicycle on the sidewalk unattended for days without someone taking it. I had a transistor radio and the only stations that played rock or pop music were AM radio and the reception was terrible.
I remember when people would moan about the terrible state of freeways like in California and now we have a stack of our own downtown, without which we would be going about 15 miles per hour Maximum on any road here at rush hour. (Yes, wouldn't it be a shame if we could all get where we were going on time?) When it comes to integration. I don't remember seeing a black person until I was about four. I was riding with my mom on a shopping trip to downtown. No one like that lived in our neighborhood. Life was simple, boys played marbles and got into mischief (considered normal by today's standards) and girls played jacks and it seemed like everyone had a bicycle and a superball. Waterwiggles and slip n' slides, hula hoops, slinkys, and a plastic boomerang. Barbie dolls and G.I. Joe were the new rage and there were nerds who carried a slide rule instead of pocket calculator. The only minaturized anything was the transistor radio. No P.C., no video games, TV screens seemed miniscule by today's standards. We had one neighbor whose wife didn't drive and their family never owned a televison set. They used to come to our house once a week to watch the Chevrolet Hour or Lawrence Welk on our One Television, a black and white thirteen inch TV. It was a console model. My mom gave me one of her old wooden ironing boards and I could put it in the irrigation water in the yard and skim across the top. My dad could build what seemed like ANYTHING out of wood and the homemade toys lasted years while the other stuff seemed to break in a week. Roller skate were all metal, including the wheels and all kites were cheap plastic. Sling shots were less than a dollar, made of wire and two rubber bands with a piece of imitation leather that would eventually tear in half. We would run through the citrus groves and throw dirt clods and small unripened green citrus fruit at each other. My dad said we always either burned something down, blew it up, or shot it to pieces with something. Model cars were the first victim, usually. Skateboards were a must and they all were pure wood with roller skate wheels and were maximum about 18 inches long, not like the yard long half fiberglass with bearing and rubber wheels like today. People complain about the bus system today and it was more of a short cut rather than transportation back then when you might have to actually walk half the distance you traveled. Schools allowed kids to run the sidewalks all weekend then and most of them had summer projects for children like crafts and ceramics. Encanto Park was always a great weekend thing and it was never crowded. Kiddyland and "the hill" with graduated steps built into "the hill" for sitting on a blanket and eating your picnic while listening to whoever was playing music at the bandshell. The lagoon was a always fun for kids since you could feed the ducks and they ate simple things. Popcorn or bread, usually, we even used to feed them what my dad called Navy Beans. The older men wore western wear with fancy Bolo ties and big nice buckles on their custom tooled belts and expensive boots and hats. A formal style hat on a man in Phoenix is still kind of rare. Life was so simple then. But we had no idea that it would grow from less than a half million people to over six and a half million in a decade. Happy Valley Road, even twenty years ago was still a dirt road out in the boonies in the desert. There was no Awatuki, no Anthem, no idea what this would turn out like. We are still growing and changing and with this economic downturn we are looking at more mass migration here. I miss the times when everything wasn't so jammed together and crowded.
Thanks,
Arizona Mildman (AZmildman)
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