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Old 11-22-2006, 07:28 PM
 
618 posts, read 384,176 times
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Can you drink out of the faucet or do you need to buy bottle water. There must be a water shortage, how bad is it and is anything that can be done about it? Are the utilitie bills expensive? Thank you.
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Old 11-22-2006, 07:48 PM
 
Location: Sonoran Desert
17,593 posts, read 20,934,868 times
Reputation: 9230
The water supply is fine. Phoenix has ample supplies for a population many times its size for the next 100 years, but the mix is complicated. There are three sources, groundwater, Central Arizona Project( CAP), and Salt River Project. Treated effluent is another, but is used in irrigation and cooling at Palo Verde and not household purposes Groundwater supplies some areas, but more and more reliance is on surface water supplies per a deal with United States to get CAP. Many of the wells have been shut down. AZ has a low priority on CAP water and could get cut off if there is a prolonged drought. In that case, we would revert to stored (recharged) groundwater and naturally occuring groundwater. The PHX area sits above a massive aquifer with some 70 million acre-feet so supplies are adequate, but the delivery system would be expensive to bring back online. If you are looking at homes here a good question to ask is whether the home is in a groundwater replenishment district. If so, you could end up paying large assessments on your property in future years. These districts are established when a subdivision cannot meet the requirement for a 100 year supply.
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Old 11-22-2006, 08:04 PM
 
618 posts, read 384,176 times
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So in other words look for a home that is not in a groundwater replenishment district right?
A prolonged drought is very likely due to Global Warming...
Thank you for the great infomation Ponderosa
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Old 11-22-2006, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Sonoran Desert
17,593 posts, read 20,934,868 times
Reputation: 9230
Quote:
Originally Posted by Balco9 View Post
So in other words look for a home that is not in a groundwater replenishment district right?
A prolonged drought is very likely due to Global Warming...
Thank you for the great infomation Ponderosa
The answer is maybe..
You should at least go in with your eyes open. AZ law requires the use of renewable water sources for new development. Groundwater is not considered a renewable resource so even though an area has groundwater, it cannot be used to meet the requirements of the law that a development have a 100 year assured supply (simplified a little but essentially it). To "get around" that law they developed the groundwater replenishment district. Here is a blurb on the replenishment district that I copied from a government site:

"If a landowner in the Phoenix, Pinal or Tucson AMA has access to a large groundwater supply and desires to rely primarily on that groundwater to demonstrate a 100-year assured water supply, he may do so by enrolling the land as a "Member Land" of the CAGRD. Buyers of CAGRD Member Land homes are required to pay an annual replenishment assessment to CAGRD based on the amount of groundwater served to that home. Under existing statutes, the assessment is included in the annual county property tax collection process. Because replenishment for Member Lands is mandated by state law, it must be accomplished regardless of cost. The assessment will increase (possibly substantially) over time as the cost of water and replenishment services increases, and the CAGRD may impose a lien on the property if the assessment is not paid.

The CAGRD provides a valuable service in protecting the state's groundwater supplies for the future while maintaining landowners' ability to subdivide their land. However, the only way a homebuyer can understand what it means for a home to be a Member Land of the CAGRD is through diligent reading of the subdivision's public report (issued by the Department of Real Estate for new subdivisions) and the conditions in the title report, and by doing additional research. There is no requirement for a homebuyer to sign a disclosure statement that acknowledges an understanding that the land they are buying is a CAGRD Member Land. Therefore, many people are probably buying homes without this knowledge."
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Old 11-22-2006, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Sonoran Desert
17,593 posts, read 20,934,868 times
Reputation: 9230
As for quality. All the cities meet federal standards. There are a lot of private companies and they too are held to the same. Nevertheless, many many people have water delivered. The water here is HARD and in summer it can have an algae taste/odor from the lakes. But the worst thing is in summer the cold water is HOT.
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Old 11-22-2006, 09:09 PM
 
3,632 posts, read 11,100,703 times
Reputation: 1187
Phoenix water= YUCK! Buy bottled!
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