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Old 06-01-2016, 06:51 PM
 
4 posts, read 1,936 times
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I've been following the boards for some time and have done other research online as my husband and I think about moving out west. Currently, I teach on the east coast and have a great understand of how our contracts and pay scale work. I've scoured the boards for this answer but can't find an answer beyond "check district websites". That doesn't answer my question fully.
In looking at district websites in the Phoenix area they are very up front with their base scale and then what they will give your credit for and how much $ that relates to. What I have had a hard time figuring out is what happens after your first year? Do you get a raise, what is it based on? If you do, do you have to negotiate it? Or is there some set amount i.e. Everyone who was rated proficient on their annual review or above gets a 2.5% raise/$1000/a bag of peanuts?
On the east coast districts and teacher unions will negotiate contracts for 3 years terms and set pay scales for those 3 years. But it doesn't seem to be the same set up out in Phoenix.
Any help would be appreciated!
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Old 06-02-2016, 11:40 PM
 
944 posts, read 392,643 times
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You would get a step increase, just like the East Coast. Often, the whole scale increases, and you may obtain other endorsements or reach another education level plateau. OTOH, Substitute pay can stay the same for decades, and even decrease (Higley).
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Old 06-03-2016, 06:29 PM
 
4 posts, read 1,936 times
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Thanks Hal Roach I appreciate the information. I was assuming step increases but had a hard time finding any contracts online. In CT all of our contracts are online and you can follow the pay increases for each of the three years.
BTW that's horrible about substitutes, glad I found that out!
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Old 06-03-2016, 09:25 PM
 
8,815 posts, read 14,729,207 times
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Raises?

Good joke.

Pay depends on the district. Some districts have different allocations/methods for paying out career progression and benchmark bonus tow payments.

Otherwise the only way you move up the scale is by adding credits, moving up in job, etc.

There really aren't negotiated scheduled increases or anything like that in most areas. The district will work with what the budget allows and goes from there and budgets for a long while have been really squeezing education, so raises if they happen at all teams to be light.

Teacher pay is pretty rough out here, but it's a good area for resume building. Lot of opportunity for leadership and transitioning out of a standard classroom role
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Old 06-04-2016, 01:48 AM
 
944 posts, read 392,643 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jskitromo View Post
Thanks Hal Roach I appreciate the information. I was assuming step increases but had a hard time finding any contracts online. In CT all of our contracts are online and you can follow the pay increases for each of the three years.
BTW that's horrible about substitutes, glad I found that out!
http://humanresources.alhambraesd.sc...40648666496a81
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Old 06-04-2016, 04:29 AM
 
4 posts, read 1,936 times
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FL according to you for someone who has two degrees and isn't looking to do any additional course work would continue to make roughly the same year 1 as year 25? That seems ridiculous. Clearly we can't predict the future , but based on what you see happening with education budgets that's what I get from your comment. Is there any data you can give to support that?

Hal I appreciate the steps, that helps me visualize and put in context. I realize that's only one district and they're all different. Some a great and value educators and some have tight budgets year after year.
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Old 06-04-2016, 05:51 AM
 
944 posts, read 392,643 times
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Per student funding is the same Statewide, as per legislation to prevent disparities in high income vs. low income areas, that exist anyways. In fact, the poorer areas will tend to pay more, and that may be related to Title I funding. The link above could be the best paying district in the State, and it is a working class neighborhood, at best. Madison ESD covers some pretty affluent parts of the city, and they are known for being extra stingy, and their job openings are usually at the bottom oh the barrel schools in the district, but that will be true many places, with unusually high turnover almost a sure sign of trouble.
40K per year in Phoenix with 700 Dollar rent or 47,000 in Fairfax County Virginia, with 1700 Dollar rent? Pick your poison. There were a number of teachers, who shared their fresh oranges and grapefruit with their fellow teachers...one of the few and better benefits that I received.
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Old 06-04-2016, 09:02 AM
 
8,815 posts, read 14,729,207 times
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My wife had been out here 13 years. Came down with a completed post grad certification program in her area of expertise. Has added a master's degree and then additional coursework to get certified as an administrator and had passed the state administration exams.

She started in a district that paid a little better, but offered zero resources. Her classroom literally contained a dozen dead roaches, 4 tattered encyclopedias, student chairs and a need for a good cleaning (which we did, the walls ran black....)

She left there for a district that was kind of the opposite.

While funding per student is fixed, the admission of those funds, voter approved district overrides and bonding as well as activity of the PTA can influence what a school has to really work with

Contracts are offered annually.

I only have word of mouth and what I've seen in my wife's pay check. No one I know had gotten much of an increase. One of our friends was trying to get out due to the stagnant pay, but landed a coaching position with a little bump.

All of this is k-8 on the Westside. Maybe it's different in other parts of the metro (doubt it) or at the HS level (possible).

There just hasn't been any growth.

Some funding has been cleared for the next decade. No one is certain where those funds will land or what happens at the end of the decade.

I'm skeptical that there will be much beyond an initial bump.
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Old 06-04-2016, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Chandler, AZ
2,047 posts, read 1,596,701 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hal Roach View Post
Alhambra is one of the WORST. Every teacher I have met that worked in that district has horror stories about administration, parents, etc. Their pay scale is a bit elevated to try and entice teachers to apply and/or stay.
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Old 06-04-2016, 07:32 PM
 
944 posts, read 392,643 times
Reputation: 584
The Superintendent was National Sup. of the Year in 1998 (Dr. Carol Peck). There is now a school named after her. She had made huge advances, but a lot of that was undone by new administration over the last decade. It was way better than Cartwright, Osborne. Fowler. or Creighton. Every district seems to have one or two schools that are "dumping grounds." In their case it is Barcelona. I've known three generations of teachers that have all said it is horrible. Oddly, that is in the Glendale portion of the school district. Security was well above average, and that was even before Columbine. As far as pay...raises have often been offset by increases in healthcare premiums, or decreases in extra monies. Some studies show that the average American is still stuck in the mid 80s on wages..so I wouldn't feel to cheated for minute pay increases. Consider that the aggregate value of real estate in Arizona was cut in half during one 12 month period.....sure it didn't hit assessments all at once, but they have to use financial accounting trickery so it didn't, which will just drag it out, that much longer. The effects of the GFC will linger on. Those who don't take charge of their finances will often struggle. The sensationalists always go for the poor teacher stories, but the truth is that 40K per year is good money in a place like Arizona.
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