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Old 01-15-2010, 05:57 PM
 
Location: Sonoran Desert
17,573 posts, read 20,896,059 times
Reputation: 9208

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Quote:
Originally Posted by observer53 View Post
I live in a no-HOA area that's about 24 years old. Even though there's no HOA, the houses all fall in the various shades of white beige tan brown. Some are on the darker or more orange or gold side, but no pink or blue or green. And, enough different builders were involved in building out the area that there really is a nice variation in the homes in terms of style and to a lesser extent, color. You do see much more variety in the older neighborhoods without HOAs. (60's and older).
Probably so, but newer areas, too have more variety than the norm. In Goodyear, new builds can not be the same color as the ones next door or across the street. The choices are all earth tones, not just - or even - beige, and that is appropriate for the home styles. The HOA's generally enforce the same rules for new paint jobs on older houses. The newest developments have all kinds of variety with stone treatments too. In my subdivision, if you repaint you MUST have a different color from your neighbors. We have moved away from the 1980s all navajo white houses that blanket so much of the valley. Personally, I like the new look here much better than new subdivisions I have seen in other parts of the country - gray toned vinyl slats or look-alike brick homes. They are are no less boring and usually have no landscaping to boot. It always amazes me that in places where they have such lovely trees, they cut them all down and leave the new homes sitting in grass fields with tiny saplings planted here and there.
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Old 01-15-2010, 07:10 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
222 posts, read 343,100 times
Reputation: 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmist View Post
I understand they are trying to blend into the desert etc, but personally I do get sick of that as well as living in a place where you are encouraged to conform to blandness. It says a lot about the personality of the people of a city when they prefer monotony to variation.

Out here the goal is to blend rather than to express individualism or character. This is probably true for most of America and not just Phoenix.

When I see photos of other countries like Greece, Mexico, Latin American and Caribbean nations where each home is full of its own character, I have a respect for even the ugliest color choices because as a whole, it feels more alive. Too much matching is boring, unnatural, uninspiring and ugly in my opinion.
Actually, in most historic parts of Europe you are restricted more than you can imagine. In the Lake District of UK, for example, you cannot modify any structure and must use the same local materials (lakeland slate, local stones, etc). In the South West of UK, if you have a house with a thatched roof (http://www.flickr.com/photos/61686932@N00/3539913247/ - broken link), you must replace with same (and can even get subsidies since it is very expensive to do so). In Italy, in any 'historic' town (eg, Cortona, Montepulciano, Siena, etc) all roofs are of a certain type and color, and must be maintained as such. In Paris, virtually all the buildings are of a common style (built by Haussmann). (The pompidou center is a very notable exception!). In Greece, the whitewashed homes they are so famous for must be kept that way. They do this to retain the historic appearance, and to avoid jeopardising the tourism industry. Only in the US have I seen wildly different architectural styles juxtaposed - reminders of Disneyland.

Edit - and in UK, when they DO build a modern home next to an old one, there is an outcry!

Last edited by Steerpike; 01-15-2010 at 07:20 PM..
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Old 01-15-2010, 09:22 PM
 
845 posts, read 1,476,704 times
Reputation: 288
Go West and you will see more pink and turquoise.
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Old 01-15-2010, 09:34 PM
 
245 posts, read 353,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ponderosa View Post
It always amazes me that in places where they have such lovely trees, they cut them all down and leave the new homes sitting in grass fields with tiny saplings planted here and there.
That bothers me too. Those kinds of neighborhoods give me a really bad/depressing vibe.
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Old 01-15-2010, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Peoria, AZ
1,064 posts, read 1,564,976 times
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Ponderosa: I hate that too. When I saw neighborhoods like that back east, I tried to figure out why people would prefer to live like that and figured maybe its so they don't have to rake leaves in the fall or something like that. It felt like living on a football field or something and then they dont even put up any kind of fences so you are completely exposed to a zillion homes in your own backyard.

Steerpike: I figured Europe was mostly historical and places like England would have rules against painting it all up and rightfully so. I don't know why I pictured Greece as being colorful, but in my mind I pictured colorful homes on the cliffs, maybe it was just the rooftops or some other accents that caught my eye against all the white. Mostly the Caribbean and Latin American Countries are the festive ones. It looks like they are always ready for a party.

As for Phoenix, I'm sure its the most practical choice to keep everything the color of the desert, but I guess I see enough brown in the landscape, I would prefer to see the structures a little more lively... anything to jolt me from all the brown. blaaah...
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Old 01-15-2010, 10:32 PM
 
2,943 posts, read 3,733,146 times
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My house is gray... makes me wish it was beige.
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Old 01-15-2010, 10:34 PM
 
Location: Peoria, AZ
1,064 posts, read 1,564,976 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ritchie_az View Post
My house is gray... makes me wish it was beige.
You probably stick out like a sore thumb and are providing some interesting fodder for gossip among the others on your street.
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Old 01-15-2010, 10:40 PM
 
2,943 posts, read 3,733,146 times
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"You probably stick out like a sore thumb and are providing some interesting fodder for gossip among the others on your street."

It doesn't really stand out. In fact, I think because of the darker tone, it actually grabs the eye less than the [brighter] earth-toned houses.
It helps, too, that there are a few other gray houses in the neighborhood....
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Old 01-15-2010, 10:52 PM
 
Location: AZ
5,137 posts, read 6,354,727 times
Reputation: 6765
It's really not like that everywhere. The newer developments are quite a bit more uniform. The older areas have more variety, as do some of the very high end all-custom home subdivisions. Areas of Carefree, Cave Creek, and North Scottsdale have a lot of variety (the expensive kind). There are pockets of tropical green around the valley, like Litchfield Park, Encanto, the Biltmore area, Arcadia, for starters. I lived in a planned development (Kierland) in North Scottsdale, however the area to the south was not a planned development and had a lot of tasteful, well established variety. Older areas of Scottsdale have some variety to them as well, but nothing that's wild or bizarre.

The uniformity used to be a little creepy, but it really grew on me. When I go back east, a lot of places look kind of unkempt, even though they may be very nice areas.

Also, as already stated, if you travel to some of the less desirable areas, you'll see plenty of wacky colors. And cars parked in front yards (not sure what the attraction of parking in your front yard is, but it seems to be a big thing in dumpy neighborhoods). And waist-high chain link fences surrounding the whole mess. No thanks!
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Old 01-15-2010, 10:57 PM
 
Location: USA
3,971 posts, read 6,236,421 times
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I've seen homes in green, but they match the desert. A cactus green was done in a house in scottsdale. It looks wonderful. Looks like a cactus green, but a slightly shade darker.

Why does it matter really? People are too concerned about the price of their house and how much they can make rather than living in it.
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