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Old 01-18-2009, 10:22 PM
 
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Got this lucky shot yesterday at the zoo, using my little digitial camera.
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Old 01-19-2009, 02:25 PM
 
Location: San Jose, CA
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Default Coyote

Spotted this coyote yesterday during a quick trip to Death Valley. What a beaut, eh?



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Old 01-19-2009, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Where Trolls get BBQ'd
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Originally Posted by kdog View Post
Spotted this coyote yesterday during a quick trip to Death Valley. What a beaut, eh?
He has a look like he has food on his mind....Great find...
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Old 01-19-2009, 09:28 PM
 
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Originally Posted by kdog View Post
Spotted this coyote yesterday during a quick trip to Death Valley. What a beaut, eh?
Wow! These are Awesome kdog, and it is indeed a beaut. Looks very well fed and healthy.
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Old 01-21-2009, 10:50 PM
 
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Default Mountain Beaver

When I first spotted this little critter I thought it was a small Nutria (Myocastor coypus), it wasn’t until I noticed the light spot under the ears and the absence of a rat like tail that I realized it was a Mountain Beaver (Aplodontia rufa).





According to my research the mountain beaver is a mammal unique to the Pacific Northwest. Its range falls mostly to the west of the Cascades, from northern California to southern British Columbia. First described by Lewis and Clark, the mountain beaver remains rather obscure, even here in the heart of its range. It is primarily nocturnal and is seldom seen.

This species is the only living member of its genus, Aplodontia, and family, Aplodontiidae is neither a true beaver nor strictly a mountain inhabitant. It is a rodent with a lineage traced back 40 million years, and is our oldest rodent. The mountain beaver has a primitive physiology. For example, it cannot pant or sweat and has a low reproductive rate. Studies have shown that its kidneys cannot concentrate uric acid as well as modern mammals so it must take in about 20% of its body weight in water daily in order to remove body wastes.
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Old 01-21-2009, 10:54 PM
 
Location: Where Trolls get BBQ'd
131,622 posts, read 43,443,153 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Redhawk View Post
When I first spotted this little critter I thought it was a small Nutria (Myocastor coypus), it wasn’t until I noticed the light spot under the ears and the absence of a rat like tail that I realized it was a Mountain Beaver (Aplodontia rufa).





According to my research the mountain beaver is a mammal unique to the Pacific Northwest. Its range falls mostly to the west of the Cascades, from northern California to southern British Columbia. First described by Lewis and Clark, the mountain beaver remains rather obscure, even here in the heart of its range. It is primarily nocturnal and is seldom seen.

This species is the only living member of its genus, Aplodontia, and family, Aplodontiidae is neither a true beaver nor strictly a mountain inhabitant. It is a rodent with a lineage traced back 40 million years, and is our oldest rodent. The mountain beaver has a primitive physiology. For example, it cannot pant or sweat and has a low reproductive rate. Studies have shown that its kidneys cannot concentrate uric acid as well as modern mammals so it must take in about 20% of its body weight in water daily in order to remove body wastes.
A prize find here Redhawk. Thanks for sharing both the info and photo.
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Old 01-31-2009, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Northern Va. from N.J.
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Old 01-31-2009, 03:18 PM
 
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Cool! Cute little critter, nice shot!
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Old 02-01-2009, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Northern Va. from N.J.
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He? was cute
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Old 02-02-2009, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Switzerland
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so cute this raccoon!
Here there are very nice shots...
I put some photos that I took with my canon 400D

a lynx (angry with me)



"Bambi"



Mom bear is playing with her cub

http://img187.imageshack.us/img187/6327/img5067rk9.jpg (broken link)
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