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Old 09-20-2008, 02:24 AM
 
Location: San Jose, CA
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That's an excellent shot.
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Old 09-20-2008, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Beautiful Buffalo :-)
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I waited all week for an over-cast day, this morning was perfect. Wouldn't you know it though, as soon as I arrived at the park..... sunshine. Blasted sunshine.

I was still playing around with some of the settings in AV, and this I thought was pretty cool. It could always be better, but for my first attempt, I'll say it's not bad. I've always wanted to learn how to make water look like that. I can't wait to take another trip to Niagara Falls.

1/15 - f/36 - iso 200 - AWB.

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Old 09-20-2008, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Where Trolls get BBQ'd
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Just a suggestion. Lower the ISO down to 100 and that would shift the shutter speed down to 1/8 of a second. One question is did you use a tripod? if so you can also use a neutral density filter or polarizing filter to slow the shutter speed down even more while keeping a correct exposure.The slower the shutter speed the steamier the falls get. I've followed a pro that has photographed several falls and his advice is like you wanted. Cloudy days to as to get a shutter speed of between 1 and 2 seconds. If the sun is to bright the water washes out and detail is lost. For this a tripod is a must using either a remote release or the self timer. If the self timer is used then be sure not to allow light to enter the camera through the view finder. Nice first attempt at doing a waterfall. I'm depending on ya to find all the vantage points and then being my self appointed tour guide when the Mrs and I get up there. When I lived in Buffalo I was way to young to even know I was alive much less the falls.
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Old 09-20-2008, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Beautiful Buffalo :-)
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In Av, going any lower with the iso would have been "auto", as with the shutter being auto. I didn't use a tripod and I had the IS off. When we finally have a day of less sunshine I will try the shot again.

The picture is in the park and a much smaller waterfalls than the mighty Niagara, if you come up here, you'll have so much capture. Buffalo really is a beautiful city and "the Falls" is an endless rush of nature.
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Old 09-20-2008, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Where Trolls get BBQ'd
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I don't understand the going lower would be in auto??? You should be in Av mode and able to set it to the len's lowest f stop of 36 if that is what it is. ISO should not change the f stop range of the lens. Never heard of such in any camera not that it may not happen. You should be able to set the f stop and the ISO and then the camera will only adjust the shutter speed for you. If you ever take a landscape shot of those falls with a tripod and that ultra slow shutter speed then you will understand the beauty of a stable camera during that long exposure. The crispness of non moving objects and the steam created by the moving water contrasted against each other is something to behold. Keep at it. May the clouds be upon you soon.
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Old 09-20-2008, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Buffalo :-)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomadicus View Post
I don't understand the going lower would be in auto??? You should be in Av mode and able to set it to the len's lowest f stop of 36 if that is what it is. ISO should not change the f stop range of the lens. Never heard of such in any camera not that it may not happen. You should be able to set the f stop and the ISO and then the camera will only adjust the shutter speed for you. If you ever take a landscape shot of those falls with a tripod and that ultra slow shutter speed then you will understand the beauty of a stable camera during that long exposure. The crispness of non moving objects and the steam created by the moving water contrasted against each other is something to behold. Keep at it. May the clouds be upon you soon.
Backing up a bit.... I can change the iso (auto, 200, 400, 800, 1600) and I can change the f-stop (5.6 - 36), I can't change the shutter speed in Av.
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Old 09-20-2008, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Where Trolls get BBQ'd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FedupWNY View Post
Backing up a bit.... I can change the iso (auto, 200, 400, 800, 1600) and I can change the f-stop (5.6 - 36), I can't change the shutter speed in Av.
It is the duty to adjust the shutter speed for you if you are shooting in Av mode. I didn't realize you had now control by using ISO. From what I read about the XSi it had an exposure range of 100-1600. Either there is a misprint on their web site or there is another problem. To clarify maybe Azkadellia can take a look as she now has a model to verify settings with. Are you out there Az??
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Old 09-20-2008, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Swamps of Florida
3,426 posts, read 6,574,367 times
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According to my D300, preset ISO is 200, i can go lower, which would be 0.3. 0.7. or 1.0, i had to figure out that one the hard way! Your lowest F stop setting will depend on the lens attached to your camera, so if your lens lowest aperture is 5.6, then that's all you're going to get. To change shutter, you will have to use either Manual, Programmed or Aperture modes. So if you are already on a shutter mode, then SS will change based on what your camera sees light wise.
When you say you can change your ISO, you're talking about camera settings, not the setting you're using while taking the shot. I think my ISO preset to Auto, i'll have to check, but if i'm taking a picture, i will adjust my ISO by using dial ring to compensate exposure.
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Old 09-20-2008, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Buffalo :-)
2,988 posts, read 5,497,486 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomadicus View Post
It is the duty to adjust the shutter speed for you if you are shooting in Av mode. I didn't realize you had now control by using ISO. From what I read about the XSi it had an exposure range of 100-1600. Either there is a misprint on their web site or there is another problem. To clarify maybe Azkadellia can take a look as she now has a model to verify settings with. Are you out there Az??
Only in "M" & "Tv" I am allowed to change the shutter speed, though with both, I cannot adjust the f/stop. Perhaps because I have the highlight tone set, which is leaving me without a 100 iso.
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Old 09-20-2008, 01:25 PM
 
Location: Where Trolls get BBQ'd
131,636 posts, read 42,778,166 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FedupWNY View Post
Only in "M" & "Tv" I am allowed to change the shutter speed, though with both, I cannot adjust the f/stop. Perhaps because I have the highlight tone set, which is leaving me without a 100 iso.
I would take out the highest tone setting and use the ISO. Tone can be adjusted in editing the same way the camera does it. The reverse is not true. You can not adjust the ISO therefore allowing the slower shutter speed. I knew there was a hitch. I did read about the toning and I understand the purpose and in non moving subjects it is an advantage. With the moving water it hurts the steam likeness if that is what you want.

When in Av mode the camera sets the shutter all the time. This can not be changed.

In Tv mode the camera sets the aperture. This can not be changed.

You simply get one choice or the other and the camera responds accordingly. If you want to freeze a moving object then Tv is the correct choice. If you want to show motion with the falls you need Av and force the camera to choose the slowest shutter speed it needs to get a correct exposure. The lower the ISO the lower the shutter speed. Try it with the tone setting off one a cloudy day and let us see the next step up.

It's always up to the user to set the ISO unless using an advanced camera and then that is not something we want to get into as it will really muddy the water of just getting the basics down.

When using Auto modes the camera guesses at the best settings depending on which auto mode you are in. I simply avoid them. I like to be in control of my images and not have the camera think it knows more than I do even if it probably does some of the time.
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