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Old 01-17-2011, 09:27 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
1,820 posts, read 3,115,239 times
Reputation: 1441

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I've got a gas-guzzling Jeep Wrangler, love it, and have no intention of ever owning something like a Chevy Aveo. Little cars that have no power are no fun to drive. I've also been thinking about buying a pickup truck, just for fun. I also live in a walkable neighborhood (in a newer energy-efficient townhome) and take transit to work during the work week, so I only really drive on weekends. I guess I'm kind of a walking contradiction? I'm 29.

I'm also curious to know if Gen Y tastes will change once they have children and need to send them to school. I'm not sure I would send my kid to a poorly-rated inner city school if there were better options available in the suburbs AND I couldn't afford private school. I know, obviously, that not all city schools are bad, but I've lived in a few larger cities and know that this issue comes up a lot.
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Old 01-17-2011, 09:39 PM
 
Location: City of McKeesport
3,933 posts, read 4,062,371 times
Reputation: 2422



I have to say I love big classic cars. I used to have a 1977 Chrysler New Yorker, a 1961 Dodge Polara, and a 1975 Ford Elite (my parents encouraged my collecting old cars as a hobby, when I was a teen, one at a time of course). Keep in mind these were just driven to car shows and pleasure driving, not everyday drivers. But you would be surprised how many people in SUV's accused me of driving "that old boat" or that "gas guzzler." Hypocrites! Those were beautiful cars, and if there were anything like those made today, I would be guilty of driving a gas guzzler.

If you have to raise a kid who likes old things in the suburbs, keep him occupied with antiques and old cars. That is what kept me sane. I made a lot of money, too.

Last edited by PreservationPioneer; 01-17-2011 at 09:54 PM..
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Old 01-17-2011, 10:21 PM
 
Location: ELFS
5,024 posts, read 3,386,336 times
Reputation: 4348
Quote:
Originally Posted by Copanut View Post
Currently under agreement. 3 minute walk to the T. Interior photos look pretty good. Rehabbing a Mt. Lebo home would pay off. That's the facts, ma'am.
I was just quoting the ad. I think it would be lovely.
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Old 01-17-2011, 10:22 PM
 
31 posts, read 31,829 times
Reputation: 12
I don't fit the Gen Y demographic at all (I'm early Gen X by the numbers) but I want exactly the same type of housing situation that they supposedly do. I've been living on a farm for the past 15 years and now I want a row house with a skinny yard within walking distance of a park, coffee shop, library, and good Thai restaurant in a neighborhood that has lots of block parties. If I didn't EVER have to drive anywhere, that would be terrific, but if I can at least ride my bike everywhere, I would be happy. So it's not just a Gen Y thing, I think a lot of people are craving living spaces and layouts that make it easier to connect with others.
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Old 01-17-2011, 10:53 PM
 
3,166 posts, read 4,281,016 times
Reputation: 1227
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianTH View Post
Yep. And right now, at least, the "sprawlburbs" are massively overbuilt relative to demand, so the trade literature is all about infill opportunities, new urbanist suburbs, and such. But if the sprawlburbs fill up, then you might see them shift focus again.

Of course a lot of this is subject to greater forces. $3, $4, $5 gas and up gets people thinking in new ways. Public expenditures on infrastructure greatly influence the economics of development. And so on. As they have always done in the past, developers will likely figure out what sort of developments all these other factors favor (in terms of their profits), then try to sell prospective buyers on what they are producing as the truest embodiment of the American Dream.
Developers give people what they want? The market works? Go figure.
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Old 01-17-2011, 10:55 PM
 
3,166 posts, read 4,281,016 times
Reputation: 1227
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aqua Teen Carl View Post
It's good that my generous is shying away from those horribly built hunks of shi*t, that's definitely something to be proud of! However, I do not see trucks or SUV's going away any time soon. Many of my peers drive trucks and desire SUV's for whatever reason. Although many people on here are very forward thinking, this is still America and we sure do love our big toys.
We're in the market for a truck now. We need a big vehicle to haul stuff but will keep our convertible and sedan too. One son drives a HUGE truck and one a sports car. Kinda like their parents!
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Old 01-17-2011, 11:03 PM
 
3,166 posts, read 4,281,016 times
Reputation: 1227
Quote:
Originally Posted by RestonRunner86 View Post
I can safely say that the majority of my peers (I'm 24) who lived in NoVA found the typical non-walkable suburban surroundings we had to be abhorrent, and I shudder to think how high taxes will have to be raised eventually back there to fix urban planning gaffes like Tysons Corner to transform them from hideous autocentric wastelands into livable environments. I moved to Pittsburgh, took a huge pay cut, and, ironically, am living the "Sex and the City" lifestyle here. I live in an upscale 1-BR loft within walking distance of Downtown Pittsburgh for 40% of what I was paying for a terribly outdated and sterile 1-BR apartment in the outer suburbs of DC. This relocation was really a no-brainer for me, and I now have other friends contemplating relocating here to Pittsburgh from DC/NoVA because they, like me, realized it was pointless to put up with living there and enduring the stress if we'd never be able to afford our own places in sustainable, walkable, and SAFE environments.

I'm big on "Going Green". I enjoy the fact that my personal vehicle gets used 75% less here in Pittsburgh than it did in Reston, VA, where everyone relied upon their automobiles. I'm considering interviewing for a higher-paying position back in my field in Oakland, which means I'd be able to WALK to work. In my former Reston, VA neighborhood I could walk on a variety of wooded trails that meandered aimlessly for no particular reason other than to provide recreation. Great. I could go running in the woods there, but here in Pittsburgh I could go running haphazardly OR walk to places I need to access.

I also have to agree with those bashing SUVs. Why do people buy them, anyways, if they don't have children, don't frequently (if ever) haul a lot of stuff, and don't frequently (if ever) go off-roading? My father (a Baby Boomer) drives a pick-up truck back-and-forth about 15 miles each way to his office everyday. I've never understood it. My mother is attached to her SUV. Why do people have more square footage (and, more importantly, CUBIC footage), than God?! For those thinking "mind your own business" perhaps you should realize that we ALL need to have a say in how NONRENEWABLE fossil fuels are consumed? I don't personally appreciate the fact that those heating/cooling 3,500 square foot homes that they live alone in or those who drive solo in Hummers to their offices cause prices of these commodities to rise for the rest of us, including those of us who are TRYING to be ecologically responsible.
Since I know many people in their 20's who live in NOVA, probably have at least 50 on my FB, I can say that this statement is not accurate, "I can safely say that the majority of my peers (I'm 24) who lived in NoVA found the typical non-walkable suburban surroundings we had to be abhorrent". Absolutely NOT true.

Why do people drive trucks and SUV's? Because they like them! They like being higher, bigger, safer, and who knows what else? Same reason that some people like brown shoes and some like black and some like pink!

Ever heard of live and let live and not judging others?
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Old 01-17-2011, 11:22 PM
 
Location: City of McKeesport
3,933 posts, read 4,062,371 times
Reputation: 2422
You nailed it. It's about living in places where it is easier to connect to others.

My parents' generation moved from the cities to the country and the suburbs to avoid people. I grew up in an isolated environment and couldn't wait to live in the city.

Quote:
Originally Posted by erbfarm View Post
I don't fit the Gen Y demographic at all (I'm early Gen X by the numbers) but I want exactly the same type of housing situation that they supposedly do. I've been living on a farm for the past 15 years and now I want a row house with a skinny yard within walking distance of a park, coffee shop, library, and good Thai restaurant in a neighborhood that has lots of block parties. If I didn't EVER have to drive anywhere, that would be terrific, but if I can at least ride my bike everywhere, I would be happy. So it's not just a Gen Y thing, I think a lot of people are craving living spaces and layouts that make it easier to connect with others.
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Old 01-17-2011, 11:34 PM
Status: "60th anniversary of the polio vaccine! Hail to Pitt!" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
70,040 posts, read 60,574,028 times
Reputation: 20191
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradjl2009 View Post
I do agree there is a change that has been coming around, but I don't think it will happen over night unless gas prices would soar to the point where commuting from the suburbs to the city will take up a large amount of a person's expenses. I think suburbs here (especially the older ones just outside of the city limits) may do better than in a lot of other cities because of relatively short commute times that people here enjoy and the large amount of park and ride lots/ the T in the South Hills make taking public transportation fairly viable to some.
Do keep in mind that not everyone who lives in the suburbs works in the city.
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Old 01-17-2011, 11:37 PM
 
Location: Great White North Hills
8,499 posts, read 7,734,220 times
Reputation: 4704
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Do keep in mind that not everyone who lives in the suburbs works in the city.
Bingo!!!
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