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Old 03-18-2011, 11:16 AM
gg
 
Location: Pittsburgh
11,675 posts, read 8,024,923 times
Reputation: 4279

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I want to make it clear, because maybe my points were taken as Brian seemed to take them. In the real estate industry, if investors are talking amongst themselves and say, "all", or strong terms to point in a direction, it is just obvious that people are talking trends or a feel for what is going on in an area. A simple example would be "everyone in Fox Chapel is rich." Obviously that isn't the case, but it is a generalization and states the area is pretty affluent. Anytime anyone talks about investment property or demographics, the terms may be strong terms, like Sewickley Heights is very expensive. How many times have I read that? The meaning is "most of Sewickley Heights is expensive, but people don't write that way. Not sure what Brian was getting at, but I don't think he knows the market in East Liberty and it is hard to communicate with someone that is trying to make a point out of using words like "all", to mean every last one. Sure, that may be Webster's version, but if I guess we cannot say Fox Chapel is expensive if we want to nitpick over something so simple. I know of a home that is listed for $174K right now and it has been on the market for a year. If it goes for $150, is that expensive? No one is now allowed to say any general terms from now on? We must be very clear and say, Fox Chapel has mixed housing and it can be pretty cheap, or expensive. That sentence doesn't say much, but I guess that is what is required these days? Wow!

Brian, it is obvious everything is general when you are talking about migration and trends. I am not sure why you don't see that? I don't think anyone reads literal terms in this context. I know what you want in East Liberty and I know I want to see the private sector dictate what its highest and best use is. It seems to end up much better than if governments dictate the outcome. We can just agree to disagree and move on.

I am pretty disappointed in your personal attacks, which do not help your side of your case.
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Old 03-18-2011, 11:23 AM
 
4,690 posts, read 2,028,757 times
Reputation: 1572
Quote:
Originally Posted by Copanut View Post
Two decisions in the 1960s changed East Liberty..These two measures ultimately failed
I'm not well-versed on E. Liberty's history, so maybe I've got this wrong, but reading the Wikipedia article here, it looks to me like

1) the problem began with the private sector - business was leaving for the 'burbs and private owners couldn't provide enough housing in Homewood.

2) two different gov't agencies (URA & Housing Authority) came up with separate plans to deal with separate problems.

3) when those plans combined, the result was disaster for E. Liberty.

So it looks to me that the real problem wasn't gov't so much as a lack of coordination of gov't. Probably the article is missing some important details, but that seems to be its logic.
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Old 03-18-2011, 12:53 PM
gg
 
Location: Pittsburgh
11,675 posts, read 8,024,923 times
Reputation: 4279
Quote:
Originally Posted by squarian View Post
I'm not well-versed on E. Liberty's history, so maybe I've got this wrong, but reading the Wikipedia article here, it looks to me like

1) the problem began with the private sector - business was leaving for the 'burbs and private owners couldn't provide enough housing in Homewood.

2) two different gov't agencies (URA & Housing Authority) came up with separate plans to deal with separate problems.

3) when those plans combined, the result was disaster for E. Liberty.

So it looks to me that the real problem wasn't gov't so much as a lack of coordination of gov't. Probably the article is missing some important details, but that seems to be its logic.
Seems Wiki isn't the greatest source for many things and can really be out there. In very general broad terms, Pittsburgh was a boom town at one time. It retracted and was overbuilt. Heating giant homes wasn't going to happen for most people. Giant empty homes were broken up and make into apartments and rented. The areas that this happened turned into slums and now a corner is being turned little by little. The city is drawing in some people. If the schools were ever good then I think you would see a huge resurgence, but that would require relocation of so many people out of the city that are already there, that I don't think I will live to see that day. The Pittsburgh School District seems to be trying to re-segragate a bit though and at some point that may help the situation. Hard to say, but if there is uncertainty that your child would be able to get into a magnet school instead of just a geographical area, I don't think you will see families move into cities from suburbs. I know I wouldn't take the chance of my kid being lumped into one of the bad schools. Not a chance.
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Old 03-18-2011, 01:02 PM
 
20,274 posts, read 18,911,542 times
Reputation: 2827
I'll just note that Post #93 should not be assumed to be accurate in any particular detail. There are some small bits of partial truth, but much is wrong and/or currently being disproven.
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Old 03-20-2011, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Portland, OR
4,262 posts, read 4,124,918 times
Reputation: 2853
I don't see East Liberty transforming magically overnight. It may take a few years for it to be a decent area.
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