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Old 04-09-2011, 05:57 AM
 
1,139 posts, read 1,041,902 times
Reputation: 694
Quote:
Originally Posted by Impala26 View Post
I grew up in Indiana Township near PA Rt.910. I find it funny that how just recently after the stretch has been resurfaced from the Rt. 28 interchange to Saxonburg Blvd. that its wide shoulders make a REALLY nice bike lanes. They're probably wide enough for safe walking/running as well. I just find this ironic because the speed limit on most of this stretch is 45mph and one would presume too high of a speed to be safe for such things, but the wide shoulders really make the difference. I think this is something other boroughs and townships should take note.
I was beginning to think no roads here had shoulders. I was scouting out a bike route the other day - going down along the Monongahela from the Waterfront to Clairton, and back into Pittsburgh on 51. No shoulder, no sidewalks, no nothing. Makes me wonder how Pittsburgh scores so high for biking. Even Houston is more bicycle-friendly. At least they have wide shoulders (~5 feet) on almost every high-trafficked road. And lots more sidewalks connecting all that sprawl together.

I'd dare say Pennsylvania suburbs are some of the most bicycle and pedestrian unfriendly places in America.
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Old 04-09-2011, 05:59 AM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
25,940 posts, read 44,677,092 times
Reputation: 10786
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmyev View Post
I'd dare say Pennsylvania suburbs are some of the most bicycle and pedestrian unfriendly places in America.
It will cost my generation billions to retrofit PA's suburbs to be walkable/bikeable because prior generations thought it was a "waste" to do so. It's a shame.
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Old 04-09-2011, 06:00 AM
 
Location: Virginia
18,717 posts, read 14,148,442 times
Reputation: 42297
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post
$$$. It seems like if something that would improve their quality-of-living costs one dime Pittsburghers don't want it.
I think you're right, it's about $$$. Maybe also a hatred of shovelling show.
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Old 04-09-2011, 06:03 AM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
25,940 posts, read 44,677,092 times
Reputation: 10786
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caladium View Post
I think you're right, it's about $$$. Maybe also a hatred of shovelling show.
Even with the absence of sidewalks SHOULDERS would be acceptable by me in the suburbs, but the vast majority of our townships here don't even have those. When I'm out on deliveries I'm always paranoid I'm going to come around some hilly bend in a road in one of the townships and suddenly see a pedestrian or a cyclist in the road. I guess narrow roads add to the "allure" of an area (Harper's Ferry Road in Northwestern Loudoun County is a good example of a narrow yet quaint road), but they're the pits if you want to get anywhere without a car.
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Old 04-09-2011, 06:07 AM
 
Location: Virginia
18,717 posts, read 14,148,442 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post
It will cost my generation billions to retrofit PA's suburbs to be walkable/bikeable because prior generations thought it was a "waste" to do so. It's a shame.
Of course, many people will see it this way: Since your generation is the one who wants it, it makes sense that your generation pays for it.
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Old 04-09-2011, 06:13 AM
 
Location: Athens, GA (via Pittsburgh, PA)
9,452 posts, read 7,808,169 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caladium View Post
Of course, many people will see it this way: Since your generation is the one who wants it, it makes sense that your generation pays for it.
Never mind that we'll all be paying for the greed of the Baby Boomers.
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Old 04-09-2011, 07:44 AM
 
Location: Virginia
18,717 posts, read 14,148,442 times
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Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
Never mind that we'll all be paying for the greed of the Baby Boomers.
'Tis always so. The boomers complained about paying for the greed of the generation before them. This generation complains about the greed of the boomers. The next generation will complain about paying for the greed of this generation.
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Old 04-09-2011, 07:54 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
887 posts, read 604,951 times
Reputation: 596
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caladium View Post
Of course, many people will see it this way: Since your generation is the one who wants it, it makes sense that your generation pays for it.
Very good point, if this generation wants it, pay for it.

I just can't see what's so hard to understand why there are no sidewalks in the suburbs. They were just not wanted or needed, so why waste the land and spend the money to build them, simple as that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
Never mind that we'll all be paying for the greed of the Baby Boomers.
I'm not sure quite what you mean by that.

Yes, the boomers are the first Americans to not makes things better for their children. Generation X is now getting their chance to run country, but I don't think things are going to change that much.
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Old 04-09-2011, 09:55 AM
Status: "Little ears of popcorn!" (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
67,894 posts, read 55,980,651 times
Reputation: 19010
Quote:
Originally Posted by stburr91 View Post
Very good point, if this generation wants it, pay for it.

I just can't see what's so hard to understand why there are no sidewalks in the suburbs. They were just not wanted or needed, so why waste the land and spend the money to build them, simple as that.

I'm not sure quite what you mean by that.

Yes, the boomers are the first Americans to not makes things better for their children. Generation X is now getting their chance to run country, but I don't think things are going to change that much.
As you've seen throughout this thread, there are many suburbs in many parts of the country that have sidewalks.


Please explain what you mean by the bold. And don't cut the boomers out yet. The oldest of us are just this year turning 65, and the youngest are only 47, a tad young to "run the country".
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Old 04-09-2011, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Perry South, Pittsburgh, PA
1,437 posts, read 1,348,340 times
Reputation: 965
I don't care about bike paths, or most sidewalks. They're a waste of money in the majority of circumstances.
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