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Old 06-07-2011, 02:25 PM
 
1,158 posts, read 1,025,637 times
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Originally Posted by Mr. Mon View Post
It wouldn't bother me a bit to get more immigrants into Pittsburgh. There is a definite labor shortage in this market for both skilled and unskilled workers. On the unskilled side construction work is backed-up for a lot of guys because they can't retain laborers. I'm talking $15+/hour for a hard day's work. People either won't do it, or so out of shape that they can't last a day carrying block, hanging drywall, or swinging a sledge hammer.
I agree. Everyone complains they can't find the neighborhood teen who would cut their grass that was so prevalent years ago.These kids today just don't want to do that kind of hard manual labor.One of my patients said he called an ad on Craig's and the guy apolegized saying he was backed up for 2 weeks and was getting 10 calls a day just to cut grass. Others wanted to know if he did any retaining wall,concrete patch work, etc. He had to turn down customers.The work is out there.
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Old 06-07-2011, 02:32 PM
gg
 
Location: Pittsburgh
11,563 posts, read 7,824,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Mon View Post
It wouldn't bother me a bit to get more immigrants into Pittsburgh. There is a definite labor shortage in this market for both skilled and unskilled workers. On the unskilled side construction work is backed-up for a lot of guys because they can't retain laborers. I'm talking $15+/hour for a hard day's work. People either won't do it, or so out of shape that they can't last a day carrying block, hanging drywall, or swinging a sledge hammer.

$15 and hour. Where are "unskilled" labor jobs that pay that?

I just looked on Craigslist for labor jobs. Most pay I saw was $10 an hour. Good luck finding a $15 an hour job. What is interesting is when I was a kid back in the late 70's and 80's I charged $10 an hour for landscaping and I had so much work, I had to turn tons of it down because the demand was too high. It is pretty sad that the wage these days is the same or even lower than back in those days. Guess the rich get richer and everyone else gets poorer.

Last edited by gg; 06-07-2011 at 02:50 PM..
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Old 06-07-2011, 06:34 PM
 
1,147 posts, read 1,117,254 times
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Originally Posted by ditchdigger View Post
And again, what are the visual clues as to what any particular worker's wage is? Unless you meant you've noticed an increase in Hispanic workers in traditionally low-wage jobs. The two are not the same thing.

I've seen more Latin appearing workers in landscaping and drywall jobs. I don't know, but their competitive advantage might be that they seem to work pretty hard, not that they work cheap.

It wasn't too long ago that I noticed a large crew of Amish-appearing workers on the roof at a Ryan homes site. If we're going by ethnic labels, the Amish workmen seem to have a pretty good reputation...
Low-wage = bricklayers at less than $9/hr; laborers at less than $7/hr.; roofers at less than $8/hr. That's what the subcontractors of the subcontractors of Ryan get paid. Of course it's piece work and you have to take the total amount paid and divide it by the actual hours worked to figure out the hourly wage. And they don't get overtime like they're supposed to. There are no visual clues; most of this is obtained via the worker. I think they're Hispanic because they only speak Spanish and they're usually from some village in Chiapas or Oaxaca, although a few were from a village near San Miguel Allende. Again, no visuals.
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Old 06-07-2011, 10:05 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
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Originally Posted by jimmyev View Post
Low-wage = bricklayers at less than $9/hr; laborers at less than $7/hr.; roofers at less than $8/hr. That's what the subcontractors of the subcontractors of Ryan get paid. Of course it's piece work and you have to take the total amount paid and divide it by the actual hours worked to figure out the hourly wage. And they don't get overtime like they're supposed to. There are no visual clues; most of this is obtained via the worker. I think they're Hispanic because they only speak Spanish and they're usually from some village in Chiapas or Oaxaca, although a few were from a village near San Miguel Allende. Again, no visuals.
Why isn't this company getting in trouble then? Minimum wage is above $7 an hour for another thing too.
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