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Old 06-21-2011, 10:40 AM
 
5,362 posts, read 6,266,770 times
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Correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that non-residents working in the city only pay the annual $52 emergency services tax. Should the city consider actually taxing the income of people who work in the city, but live elsewhere? I'm not sure how common this is, but it's not unprecedented. As an example, here is a section of the tax code of Toledo, where I used to live.

Quote:
(The income tax will be levied) On all salaries, wages, commissions and other compensation (including tips and
gratuities) earned or received by non-resident individuals of the City of Toledo, for work
done or services performed or rendered in the City of Toledo. (source, page 4) (http://www.ci.toledo.oh.us/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=-lEd1fnmV-c%3d&tabid=211&mid=955 - broken link)
How little the city benefits from people living in the suburbs, compared to how much those people benefit from the city, seems to be a pretty common theme on this board. I'm just wondering if anybody thinks this would be a good solution or not.
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Old 06-21-2011, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh area
9,918 posts, read 19,221,637 times
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It's a tricky balance. Some cities do have commuter taxes, but impose that here where there's never been one and it could cause some businesses to purposely relocate outside the city limits to avoid it. Off the top of my head that would be the main drawback.
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Old 06-21-2011, 10:46 AM
 
Location: ɥbɹnqsʇʇıd
4,601 posts, read 5,508,058 times
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Since this hasn't ever been done in this area, it would cause a massive uproar.
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Old 06-21-2011, 10:48 AM
 
Location: Crafton, PA
1,145 posts, read 1,758,734 times
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So would those individuals be taxed twice? I am not against a flat commuter tax but instituting a separate income tax would probably be counter-intuitive for the city. Also consider that most of these commuters are already paying a hefty price to make the commute (gas, parking, public transportation, etc...).
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Old 06-21-2011, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
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I've always argued that non-city residents who work within the city limits do contribute to the city indirectly by patronizing businesses within the city limits during their work hours. Those businesses pay taxes to the city on the money they earn from their patrons. Those businesses exist in the city because they have patrons. I have never bought the argument that suburbanites only come in, use the city and leave. Anyone who works downtown is far more likely to spend money downtown than anyone who does not work downtown. There are lunches to be bought, lunchtime shopping to do, and happy hours to attend. And anyone who comes into the city daily for work is more likely to either stay and play or come in on the weekend and play. Without hard data I can't say that some sort of income tax would raise more money for the city than not taxing income and letting people spend it at businesses instead. I'm a city resident, btw, but if I were living outside the city and were charged an extra income tax on top of the expense of my commute (parking, public transit, etc.) I'd have to look long and hard about wanting to work in the city, and would be less likely to spend any money during the work day.
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Old 06-21-2011, 11:05 AM
 
Location: South Side Flats, Pittsburgh, PA
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Instead expand the city borders, and thus the tax base. Pittsburgh is ridiculously small for the overall size of the metro area. Besides, does Allegheny County really need 100 different mayors, municipal councils, etc?
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Old 06-21-2011, 11:07 AM
 
1,714 posts, read 1,881,540 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Faer View Post
Instead expand the city borders, and thus the tax base. Pittsburgh is ridiculously small for the overall size of the metro area. Besides, does Allegheny County really need 100 different mayors, municipal councils, etc?
The whole area would be better off, but I think there are too many old grudges and too much silly pride involved to ever make it happen.
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Old 06-21-2011, 11:10 AM
 
5,362 posts, read 6,266,770 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Faer View Post
Instead expand the city borders, and thus the tax base. Pittsburgh is ridiculously small for the overall size of the metro area. Besides, does Allegheny County really need 100 different mayors, municipal councils, etc?
This is probably the best route. I think school districts would have to stay the same or slowly be consolidated. Changing the county's school districts would cause more backlash than an income tax on non-residents.
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Old 06-21-2011, 11:13 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
12,753 posts, read 16,660,616 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SammyKhalifa View Post
The whole area would be better off, but I think there are too many old grudges and too much silly pride involved to ever make it happen.
I think it has less to do with that, and more to do with the fact that Pennsylvania law makes annexation damn near impossible.
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Old 06-21-2011, 11:14 AM
 
20,273 posts, read 27,758,786 times
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Tax wages, but give a deduction for any money spent in the City.
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