U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Pennsylvania > Pittsburgh
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Old 08-16-2011, 10:35 AM
 
Location: City of McKeesport
3,933 posts, read 4,062,371 times
Reputation: 2422

Advertisements

Please visit the following link for my latest photo tour of the California-Kirkbride (Old Allegheny Rows Historic District) neighborhood of Pittsburgh.

Discovering Historic Pittsburgh: Urban Prairie in Pittsburgh: A Photo Case Study
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-16-2011, 10:56 AM
 
Location: ɥbɹnqsʇʇıd
4,479 posts, read 3,225,514 times
Reputation: 3284
This area always struck me as some sort of post-apocalyptic Pittsburgh present day. I have no idea how this part of town still exists and the fact that they're going to be building townhouses a stones throw away in Manchester is going to be....interesting.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-16-2011, 02:15 PM
 
1,515 posts, read 1,510,233 times
Reputation: 1027
This area was developed around 1890, as "Hollywood Place". It was originally supposed to have over 400 homes, built according to the "Philadelphia Plan" (rowhouses), but due to the panic of 1893, less than half were built. This area was largely intact as of 1990, but by the end of the decade lay in ruins.

In reality, Pittsburgh doesn't really know what urban prairie is. Take a look at this fantastic site to really see some urban prairie.

http://www.builtstlouis.net/northsid...s_place00.html

http://www.detroityes.com/home.htm

Last edited by Herodotus; 08-16-2011 at 03:14 PM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-16-2011, 03:47 PM
 
Location: City of McKeesport
3,933 posts, read 4,062,371 times
Reputation: 2422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Herodotus View Post
This area was developed around 1890, as "Hollywood Place". It was originally supposed to have over 400 homes, built according to the "Philadelphia Plan" (rowhouses), but due to the panic of 1893, less than half were built. This area was largely intact as of 1990, but by the end of the decade lay in ruins.

In reality, Pittsburgh doesn't really know what urban prairie is. Take a look at this fantastic site to really see some urban prairie.

Built St. Louis: The North Side | St. Louis Place

The Fabulous Ruins of Detroit
Yes, I linked to BuiltStLouis's excellent page detailing how urban prairie happens in my blog post. It's a GREAT site!

The 1984 historic district nomination of California-Kirkbride details that some houses in the neighborhood were built in the 1870s.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-16-2011, 04:40 PM
 
1,515 posts, read 1,510,233 times
Reputation: 1027
Quote:
Originally Posted by alleghenyangel View Post
Yes, I linked to BuiltStLouis's excellent page detailing how urban prairie happens in my blog post. It's a GREAT site!

The 1984 historic district nomination of California-Kirkbride details that some houses in the neighborhood were built in the 1870s.
The section built in the 1890's is veru easy to spot. It is very Philadelphia like in it's look and layout. It's basically the section west of the post office with the flat roofed rowhouses. The earlier sections tend to have gabled roofs with dormers, a style which persisted in Pittsburgh, long after the flat roof had become dominant in other rowhouse cities.

Built St. Louis is indeed an excellent site. I like it better than the Detroit site because the housing in St. Louis was far more impressive than that in most of Detroit, so seeing it in ruins is really jarring.

Saint Louis Photo Gallery by step2me at pbase.com
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-17-2011, 07:50 AM
 
1,542 posts, read 960,571 times
Reputation: 1037
It sucks to see so many empty holes in the blocks (as much as they're blocks any more), but on the other hand I'm not sure I'd want to continue living next to a collapsing firetrap on the hopes that someone will fix it up some day. :/
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-17-2011, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Charlotte
1,488 posts, read 1,342,250 times
Reputation: 863
Really great pictures. I know they mean to illustrate a negative aspect, but I think they are also incredibly beautiful!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-17-2011, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Virginia
18,717 posts, read 15,638,857 times
Reputation: 42363
Quote:
Originally Posted by SammyKhalifa View Post
It sucks to see so many empty holes in the blocks (as much as they're blocks any more), but on the other hand I'm not sure I'd want to continue living next to a collapsing firetrap on the hopes that someone will fix it up some day. :/
I tend to agree with this POV. The gaps are heartbreaking but the collapsing building that got torn down is often much uglier. It's a shame they can't put windows in the side walls, though--that could go a long way to making the gaps look a little better. At least the grass is mowed, but if the gaps were turned into community gardens that would be better.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-17-2011, 11:12 AM
 
Location: City of McKeesport
3,933 posts, read 4,062,371 times
Reputation: 2422
I always wished that when the city would tear down these historic row-houses, they would save and restore the facades. It would create a wonderful cosmetic effect, in spite of the building being essentially gone, and would remove the blighted look that row-house communities have after many demolitions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Caladium View Post
I tend to agree with this POV. The gaps are heartbreaking but the collapsing building that got torn down is often much uglier. It's a shame they can't put windows in the side walls, though--that could go a long way to making the gaps look a little better. At least the grass is mowed, but if the gaps were turned into community gardens that would be better.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-17-2011, 11:18 AM
 
4,096 posts, read 3,261,095 times
Reputation: 1681
What's interesting about this to me is that a single "missing tooth", like the ones you posted on Boyle Street, look horrible. But when you go full hillbilly / hockey player, and have only very few "teeth" on a block, it actually is more appealing to me.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Pennsylvania > Pittsburgh

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top