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Old 12-08-2011, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Kittanning
4,626 posts, read 7,832,456 times
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Unemployment Rates for Large Metropolitan Areas

Pittsburgh has 5th lowest unemployment rate for all US metropolitan areas with 1 million or more population. It's time to retire the rust-belt stigma and negativity. Also, notice Buffalo at #8 (yes, BUFFALO!) and Cleveland at #10. The times are changing.
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Old 12-08-2011, 09:40 PM
 
7,112 posts, read 8,724,588 times
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It could be more indicative of some cities being economically anemic to begin with. Certainly places like Atlanta and especially Las Vegas were riding the housing bubble. If a lot of people are not moving into an area, the housing market won't be particularly susceptible. I remember on the old Trib board we had a former Pittsburgher named "Vegas" who over years would incessantly crow about Las Vegas' rising prices for homes and higher pay and post article after article about it, and lecture Pittsburgh about its poor "leadership" reflected in its lower housing prices and pay. I wonder if the guy lost his shirt in all this and what he has to say to Pittsburgh or about Las Vegas now.
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Old 12-08-2011, 10:05 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
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I'm not to surprised that it is so low but it is still good to see that.
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Old 12-09-2011, 12:30 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,454 posts, read 19,106,124 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MathmanMathman View Post
It could be more indicative of some cities being economically anemic to begin with. Certainly places like Atlanta and especially Las Vegas were riding the housing bubble. If a lot of people are not moving into an area, the housing market won't be particularly susceptible. I remember on the old Trib board we had a former Pittsburgher named "Vegas" who over years would incessantly crow about Las Vegas' rising prices for homes and higher pay and post article after article about it, and lecture Pittsburgh about its poor "leadership" reflected in its lower housing prices and pay. I wonder if the guy lost his shirt in all this and what he has to say to Pittsburgh or about Las Vegas now.
I remember that guy. I never took him too seriously. The worst of them all was VoodooLounger. What an ******* that guy was. Even in the rare instances that I agreed with him, I felt dirty because I didn't want him speaking on my behalf.
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Old 12-09-2011, 04:13 AM
 
20,273 posts, read 29,825,123 times
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And it would be even lower if job-seekers weren't moving here.
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Old 12-09-2011, 05:56 AM
 
1,158 posts, read 1,669,574 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alleghenyangel View Post
Unemployment Rates for Large Metropolitan Areas

It's time to retire the rust-belt stigma and negativity. Also, notice Buffalo at #8 (yes, BUFFALO!) and Cleveland at #10.
Vey surprising and unexpected to see those 3 cities in the top 10!

Just goes to prove that rust never sleeps! It has re-galvanized itself and has many more years of useful life in its future.
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Old 12-09-2011, 07:02 AM
 
Location: Virginia
18,717 posts, read 28,079,199 times
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Originally Posted by rhondee View Post
Just goes to prove that rust never sleeps! It has re-galvanized itself and has many more years of useful life in its future.
LOL, very poetic, and worthy of a fortune cookie.

As for the unemployment rate: Yay!! May the new year bring plenty of good job opportunities for those who are looking, and raises to those who already have jobs.
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Old 12-09-2011, 07:22 AM
 
1,158 posts, read 1,669,574 times
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Originally Posted by Caladium View Post
LOL, very poetic, and worthy of a fortune cookie.

As for the unemployment rate: Yay!! May the new year bring plenty of good job opportunities for those who are looking, and raises to those who already have jobs.
LOL! It's not allowing me to rep you again Caladium so here's +1!!!
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Old 12-09-2011, 07:26 AM
gg
 
Location: Pittsburgh
20,715 posts, read 20,022,638 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianTH View Post
And it would be even lower if job-seekers weren't moving here.
I was thinking the opposite. We wouldn't rank if we didn't have that mass population move out during the past decades. I don't think you would win your argument Brian.

PITTSBURGH -- The City of Brotherly Love has successfully wooed enough new residents to record its first population increase in 60 years, according to Census figures released Wednesday.

Overall, the 2010 statistical portrait of Pennsylvania showed eastern and central counties with the biggest gains over the past decade. Western counties generally lost residents.

The number of Pennsylvania residents increased 3.4 percent, to just over 12.7 million. Still, the state will lose one of its 19 congressional seats because of the demographic changes.

But Pittsburgh, the state's second-largest city, lost 8.6 percent of its population, leaving about 305,000 residents; its home, Allegheny County, totaled about 1.2 million people, a 4.6 percent decrease.

Pittsburgh had a population of 676,806 in 1950.
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Old 12-09-2011, 07:30 AM
gg
 
Location: Pittsburgh
20,715 posts, read 20,022,638 times
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A quick look will show, while this is good news, it is mostly to do with mass population losses. Hopefully the rust belt will be making the turn and maybe we have seen the bottom. You think Pittsburgh population leaving in droves was bad, have a look at Cleveland.

2010 census population numbers show Cleveland below 400,000; Northeast Ohio down 2.2 percent | cleveland.com
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