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Old 12-29-2011, 06:07 PM
 
6,536 posts, read 3,915,039 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by globalburgh View Post
I don't understand the bottleneck analogy. If you will, this "bottleneck" would improve movement between the neighborhoods.
We see it with freeways. Even if you build a bridge with sidewalks, it doesn't encourage people to move between the two halves much. A freeway is a psychological barrier. A wide park gives the sense that it is no more than a continuation of the usual streetscape.

Don't know what effect an incline would have. But it represents a sliver of a connection and I suppose people would use it if they feel the need to make the "special" trip. It doesn't really bring the areas together; just a means to get there and back.

A mountain or river separates places as well and that more or less won't be overcome, but they at least have aesthetic value. For the most part, people don't sit on the banks of a freeway and watch the road and traffic.
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Old 12-29-2011, 07:00 PM
 
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I think it should be noted that while the transition from the Lower Hill to Downtown was a lot better before Crosstown, they were never really "unified", in part for topographic reasons (the Hill is in fact a hill). Here is an interesting pre-Crosstown photo, with current streets and the location of the Arena marked. It is still clear the Lower Hill and Downtown were adjacent but distinct:

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Old 12-29-2011, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ctoocheck View Post
It would also be great to make the area under the Crosstown between Downtown and Soho/Duquesne/Bluff/Uptown/Whatever more pleasing.
LOL! What IS the correct name of that neighborhood, anyways? I've lived here over a year, and I still get people who look at me puzzled when I say I'm making a delivery in SoHo.
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Old 12-29-2011, 08:51 PM
 
Location: ELFS
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post
LOL! What IS the correct name of that neighborhood, anyways? I've lived here over a year, and I still get people who look at me puzzled when I say I'm making a delivery in SoHo.
Back in the days before Big Bright Blue Branding Street Signage, everything between Robinson Street (western edge of Oakland) and Downtown that wasn't Duquesne was just called the Hill District.
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Old 12-29-2011, 09:53 PM
 
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I think the lower hill would look more connected to downtown if some decent height residential/mixed use (15 stories or so) buildings were erected in the lots closest to downtown. It would give the image of downtown "stepping down" into the hill rather then abruptly endings at crosstown.
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Old 12-30-2011, 05:41 AM
 
20,274 posts, read 17,922,507 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post
LOL! What IS the correct name of that neighborhood, anyways? I've lived here over a year, and I still get people who look at me puzzled when I say I'm making a delivery in SoHo.
I believe Soho really only referred to a neighborhood on the Oakland end, around the Birmingham Bridge.

The Bluff and Uptown, however, seem to be true rivals. I suspect that if it is successfully redeveloped, Uptown may win out in the end.
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Old 12-30-2011, 05:45 AM
 
20,274 posts, read 17,922,507 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by baconlegs View Post
I think the lower hill would look more connected to downtown if some decent height residential/mixed use (15 stories or so) buildings were erected in the lots closest to downtown. It would give the image of downtown "stepping down" into the hill rather then abruptly endings at crosstown.
Last I knew, that was more or less the plan. Visualizing it from Downtown, I think it will definitely communicate that notion of Downtown spilling into that area.
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