U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Pennsylvania > Pittsburgh
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-30-2011, 02:26 PM
 
20,274 posts, read 18,021,137 times
Reputation: 2820
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post
I fear that in just a couple more years, though, ALL of the "bargains" here will have been snatched up by investors looking to create a Pittsburgh-specific housing bubble, driving up housing prices so those of us seeking to enter the market as first-time home-buyers will be unsuccessful and will once again have to relocate to cheaper pastures (dare I say Youngstown?)
I'm not saying none of it is speculative, but I should note the data suggests that in recent years, a lot of the price increase in the core area is in fact being driven by demand increases. In other words, it is being funded with new people with decent incomes looking for housing in the core area.

That's cold comfort if you are bargain hunting with limited means, but I think it will help clarify your options if you realize you didn't arrive here alone, and a lot of those other people are making decent money.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-30-2011, 04:02 PM
Status: "Loving the mild fall weather." (set 13 days ago)
 
Location: Crafton via San Francisco
2,611 posts, read 1,706,648 times
Reputation: 856
Quote:
Originally Posted by h_curtis View Post
Not even close to the rate of true inflation. Also, considering the massive taxes required to hold a property here, there is actually a negative appreciation situation. In other words, you pay more to own than what you will ever get back. Those silly studies don't consider property tax that eats away at any profits that might be had. There won't be any.
Here in San Francisco I pay $2300 a month in rent for a 2bdr, 1ba townhouse with a parking space - not a garage. It's in a decent middle class neighborhood, but hasn't been upgraded in many years. Units in my complex that have upgraded kitchens cost a few hundred $ more per month. The rent is killing me. Rents have always been high here, but they're even higher now that so many people have lost their homes to foreclosure and have to rent.

I'm considering moving to Pittsburgh because I could buy a modest home and pay the mortgage, insurance, taxes, and upkeep for far less than I'm paying in rent in San Francisco. I agree that property taxes in Pittsburgh are high. But because home prices are so low, the actual dollars I'd be spending make it very attractive. California's low property taxes and high home values (in the SF Bay Area where I live home values are still high) are too expensive for me. Cost of living is more important to me than profit. As long as there aren't any wild fluctuations like we saw with the housing bubble and subsequent crash, I'll be happy. Pittsburgh's relatively stable home prices are another big reason I'm considering the move. Thought you'd like the perspective of an outsider. I'm guessing that there are people in other parts of the country who see the Pittsburgh market the way I do.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-30-2011, 04:30 PM
 
4,666 posts, read 4,529,125 times
Reputation: 1971
Quote:
Originally Posted by juliegt View Post
Here in San Francisco I pay $2300 a month in rent for a 2bdr, 1ba townhouse with a parking space - not a garage. It's in a decent middle class neighborhood, but hasn't been upgraded in many years. Units in my complex that have upgraded kitchens cost a few hundred $ more per month. The rent is killing me. Rents have always been high here, but they're even higher now that so many people have lost their homes to foreclosure and have to rent.

I'm considering moving to Pittsburgh because I could buy a modest home and pay the mortgage, insurance, taxes, and upkeep for far less than I'm paying in rent in San Francisco. I agree that property taxes in Pittsburgh are high. But because home prices are so low, the actual dollars I'd be spending make it very attractive. California's low property taxes and high home values (in the SF Bay Area where I live home values are still high) are too expensive for me. Cost of living is more important to me than profit. As long as there aren't any wild fluctuations like we saw with the housing bubble and subsequent crash, I'll be happy. Pittsburgh's relatively stable home prices are another big reason I'm considering the move. Thought you'd like the perspective of an outsider. I'm guessing that there are people in other parts of the country who see the Pittsburgh market the way I do.
You hit the nail on the head.....that a problem with native Pittsburghers...they pigeon hole the place because they live insular lives to only the Burgh...

I pay damn near the same thing living in a 1 Br in NYC and maybe its the "Rents too damn high" fatigue thats getting to me but everytime I come home Pittsburgh I dont want to go back....

Pittsburghers truly dont know how good theyve got it......
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-30-2011, 08:49 PM
 
Location: City of McKeesport
3,910 posts, read 3,793,309 times
Reputation: 2366
Thank god there are several declining rust-belt cities to choose from when Pittsburgh's comeback jumps the shark.

What I want to ask all of these people who have suddenly "discovered" how great Pittsburgh is and how affordable our real estate is: Have you never heard of Buffalo, Cleveland, Toledo, St. Louis, Milwaukee, Cincinnatti, etc.? They all offer pretty much the same thing Pittsburgh does, minus row-houses (except for Cincy and St. Louis).

People are such sheep. Nobody wanted to move here until a few magazines proclaimed it was a great city to move to. Now everyone is on that bandwagon.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-30-2011, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Athens, GA (via Pittsburgh, PA)
9,580 posts, read 8,157,834 times
Reputation: 8632
Quote:
Originally Posted by alleghenyangel View Post
Thank god there are several declining rust-belt cities to choose from when Pittsburgh's comeback jumps the shark.

What I want to ask all of these people who have suddenly "discovered" how great Pittsburgh is and how affordable our real estate is: Have you never heard of Buffalo, Cleveland, Toledo, St. Louis, Milwaukee, Cincinnatti, etc.? They all offer pretty much the same thing Pittsburgh does, minus row-houses (except for Cincy and St. Louis).

People are such sheep. Nobody wanted to move here until a few magazines proclaimed it was a great city to move to. Now everyone is on that bandwagon.
Just ride the wave, and by the time Pittsburgh "jumps the shark," advocates of the city will be able to tell the quantity-obsessed to pound sand.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-31-2011, 06:11 AM
 
Location: Virginia
18,717 posts, read 14,677,584 times
Reputation: 42325
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post
Surely there has to be more than life than working 70 hours per week
If everyone down here is working 70 hours per week, how do you explain all the threads on the Nova forum for leisure activities? If we really worked those kinds of hours, who'd have time for kayaking, taking art classes, hiking, soccer leagues, symphonies, etc?

Plus, it's hard not to notice that you, yourself, didn't work 70+ hours when you lived in Nova--you only started doing that after you moved to Pittsburgh and needed to have two delivery driver jobs to make ends meet--and even with those two jobs you were still on cd complaining how you barely could pay your bills. You also don't see anyone on the Nova forum complaining about how they have been searching for over a year for a job that uses their college degree.

Here's my wish for a New Years resolution for this forum: Let's resolve to go a full year talking about Pittsburgh, not obsessing about or sniping at northern Virginia. Wishful thinking I guess, but that's my wish.

Last edited by Caladium; 12-31-2011 at 07:06 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-31-2011, 06:24 AM
 
Location: Virginia
18,717 posts, read 14,677,584 times
Reputation: 42325
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post
AI fear that in just a couple more years, though, ALL of the "bargains" here will have been snatched up by investors looking to create a Pittsburgh-specific housing bubble, driving up housing prices so those of us seeking to enter the market as first-time home-buyers will be unsuccessful and will once again have to relocate to cheaper pastures (dare I say Youngstown?)
I'll bet you can find something. As neighborhoods gentrify, more bargains will appear. Pittsburgh has a lot of great houses.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-31-2011, 06:31 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh area
9,882 posts, read 9,332,532 times
Reputation: 4652
Quote:
Originally Posted by alleghenyangel View Post
What I want to ask all of these people who have suddenly "discovered" how great Pittsburgh is and how affordable our real estate is: Have you never heard of Buffalo, Cleveland, Toledo, St. Louis, Milwaukee, Cincinnatti, etc.? They all offer pretty much the same thing Pittsburgh does, minus row-houses (except for Cincy and St. Louis).
Real estate-wise these might be pretty similar, but location-wise they are not. Or at least that's what I notice right away. Only Pittsburgh (and you could maybe argue Cleveland or Buffalo) has a reasonable proximity to the east coast. That may not matter to some but for me for example I'd be much more cut off from family and such if I lived in one of those other places.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-31-2011, 06:41 AM
 
Location: City of McKeesport
3,910 posts, read 3,793,309 times
Reputation: 2366
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post
I fear that in just a couple more years, though, ALL of the "bargains" here will have been snatched up by investors looking to create a Pittsburgh-specific housing bubble, driving up housing prices so those of us seeking to enter the market as first-time home-buyers will be unsuccessful and will once again have to relocate to cheaper pastures (dare I say Youngstown?)
I actually have this same fear, and I am witnessing it become reality as we speak. When I initially purchased my row-house in Stowe, I viewed it as a very basic starter home, that I could move up from over time as I saved more money living there. What I'm seeing is that the houses that used to sell for $20k, are now selling for $40k, and houses that used to be listed at $40k are now being listed at $70k. I remember when I first moved here that you could find a liveable, but dated and modest, house in Lawrenceville for under $30k. Now those are $65k. You used to be able to find a row-house in Bloomfield for $50k, and now they are $90k.

The only houses that are under $20k these days are in places like Larimer, Beltzhoover, or Mount Oliver, which make Stowe look like Beverly Hills. And those cheap houses are usually dilapidated and ugly.

It's disheartening to me that not only have all the bargains dried up, probably because they were snatched up by investors, but also that I find real estate in Pittsburgh just isn't a good deal anymore. I can do a search for all homes under $60k in Pittsburgh, and out of hundreds of listings find maybe three that aren't in Duquesne or McKeesport, or covered in insulbrick. It used to be different -- just saying!

I was looking forward to trading up to a nicer house someday, but as things are now, the $30k houses aren't nicer. And when you can buy a beautiful house in Youngstown or Steubenville or Wheeling for that amount, Pittsburgh just seems less and less appealing to me, if I am to move up to a better house and neighborhood. My dream was to own an 1870s brownstone, but that's definitely not in the cards in Pittsburgh for this starving social worker.

The one ray of light here is that I may be able to sell my house for what I've put into it after all. LOL

These have been the confessions of a bona fide cheapskate with a deathly fear of mortgages.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-31-2011, 06:51 AM
 
15 posts, read 4,781 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by alleghenyangel View Post
The only houses that are under $20k these days are in places like Larimer, Beltzhoover, or Mount Oliver, which make Stowe look like Beverly Hills. And those cheap houses are usually dilapidated and ugly.
But they do have character and soul...lol.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Pennsylvania > Pittsburgh

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:02 PM.

© 2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top