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Old 02-09-2012, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
981 posts, read 710,061 times
Reputation: 693

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Swissvale has many of the key elements that make up a desirable neighborhood. Good proximity to the employment centers, good transportation infrastructure connecting to the employment centers, and amities, good public transportation, good housing stock, walkable neighborhoods, and a it's own central business district. People are willing to pay a premium for these kinds of neighborhoods, so I believe it's just a matter of time until Swissvale sees an increase in demand.

There is no denying that Swissvale has seen some decline in the last 20 years, most of that decline has been near the Rankin border. However, that section of the borough has been the focus of several redevelopment efforts in the last few years, and will continue to see more projects in the future. The redevelopment of the Carrie Furnace site will no doubt further improve the Swissvale, Rankin border area.

As a 15 year resident of Swissvale, I can confirm that what others have said about Swissvale being mostly stable, is indeed correct. I think in the next 10-20 years, people will see the area as a desirable, yet reasonably affordable East End neighborhood (albeit not technically an East End neighborhood).

I think many of the same things can be said about Wilkinsburg. I would say that everything west of the busway, will see meaningful improvement in the next 10-20 years. The neighborhoods closest to the business district will also see meaningful improvement in the next 10-20 years. I can see Wilkinsburg taking a similar path as East Liberty, eventually attracting large developers.

Last edited by stburr91; 02-09-2012 at 11:19 AM..
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Old 02-09-2012, 11:35 AM
 
1,521 posts, read 1,516,024 times
Reputation: 1031
Quote:
Originally Posted by alleghenyangel View Post
In Cleveland, for example, once you cross the city line into the first-ring suburbs, that is actually the "nice" area that everyone wants to move to!
I take it that you've never been to East Cleveland. I'm not talking about the "east side" of the city of Cleveland, but the municipality of East Cleveland. A once high end suburb, in total ruins.
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Old 02-09-2012, 11:52 AM
 
783 posts, read 1,139,009 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caladium View Post
I've never been to Brentwood, but it sounds like it's a nice part of Pittsburgh. A shame to hear it has problems with racism, though. Have you ever done a photo tour of it?
I've never understood the reputation that Brentwood has with some people as being nice. It's a mixture of old people, white ghetto, and hillbillies. The home values there are complete garbage, too. I don't mean to insult the folks living there, but I just don't see it as a nice area. I've never met one person that was deciding on Brentwood or Mt. Lebanon to buy a home. I've never met one person that was deciding between Squirrel Hill, Fox Chapel, and Brentwood for a home. To me, there is almost no difference in quality of homes between Brentwood and places like Overbrook or Castle Shannon. They're mediocre areas for lower middle class folks. Nothing more, nothing less.
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Old 02-09-2012, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh PA
1,128 posts, read 1,043,398 times
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I can see Swissvale becoming more popular in the years to come. The location is difficult to beat, right before the Sq. Hill tunnels making it one of the easiest eastern suburbs to commute from. Plus, the busway makes the commute easier. I see it growing in the years to come at the expense of places such as Monroeville, Plum and Penn Hills
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Old 02-09-2012, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
26,558 posts, read 47,304,037 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Love2Golf09 View Post
They're mediocre areas for lower middle class folks. Nothing more, nothing less.
Some people would find this trait to be preferable to living in a "mediocre" place than in a more affluent neighborhood. I may be the rarity as a young gay liberal college-educated professional who absolutely adores Polish Hill, but I'd rather live here than in a place like Shadyside amongst "my kind". I pay far less in rent, yet I can walk to many places or be a short drive or bus ride away from anything/everything people in Shadyside are also near. I'm also quite fond of Millvale, Etna, and Sharpsburg and would consider buying a home in those areas if the right one came onto the market.
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Old 02-09-2012, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
26,558 posts, read 47,304,037 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by escilade18 View Post
I see it growing in the years to come at the expense of places such as Monroeville and Penn Hills
Actually, one can argue that the impending deterioration of places like Penn Hills and Monroeville is a byproduct of the ongoing gentrification of the East End of the City of Pittsburgh.
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Old 02-09-2012, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh PA
1,128 posts, read 1,043,398 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post
Actually, one can argue that the impending deterioration of places like Penn Hills and Monroeville is a byproduct of the ongoing gentrification of the East End of the City of Pittsburgh.
That is an interesting argument but one that has merit to it. Ironically, in my parents generation, it was seen as impressive to move out of the east end neighborhoods like Shadyside to Penn Hills, now the complete opposite is coming true.
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Old 02-09-2012, 12:31 PM
 
20,274 posts, read 18,911,542 times
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It looks to me like Monroeville is actually going through some sort of renaissance, with lots of new investments. This is another case where it may be helpful to remember that the City is relatively small in size, and that if it was closer to a normal size, Monroeville might be close to that border. In other words, it is really more of an inner suburb than outer suburb or exurb.

Monroeville also has a lot of potential to densify and become more of a satellite town than a sprawlburb (that is basically the nature of many of the recent investments). Toss in the good highway access and decent bus service (which could be improved further with an extension of the East Busway), and I am actually relatively bullish on Monroeville's prospects.
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Old 02-09-2012, 01:14 PM
 
Location: East End of Pittsburgh
747 posts, read 624,990 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianTH View Post
It looks to me like Monroeville is actually going through some sort of renaissance, with lots of new investments. This is another case where it may be helpful to remember that the City is relatively small in size, and that if it was closer to a normal size, Monroeville might be close to that border. In other words, it is really more of an inner suburb than outer suburb or exurb.

Monroeville also has a lot of potential to densify and become more of a satellite town than a sprawlburb (that is basically the nature of many of the recent investments). Toss in the good highway access and decent bus service (which could be improved further with an extension of the East Busway), and I am actually relatively bullish on Monroeville's prospects.
The new UPMC medical complex is amazing. I never got the impression that Monroeville was declining. It has aged but not in full decline. Penn Hills is another story.
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Old 02-09-2012, 01:22 PM
 
20,274 posts, read 18,911,542 times
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I only know the commercial area, but I'd agree it was more a sense of stagnation than rapid decline. Still, I think there has been a recent change to a more dynamic feel.
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