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Old 05-30-2012, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
3,699 posts, read 3,129,045 times
Reputation: 1687
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianTH View Post
They'd do it in phases, but overall I would say yes, absolutely. I'd note the City appears to be adding over 2000 people annually to its labor force count these days (this is by place of residence--jobs are growing even faster). Those people are likely mostly younger with good educations and decent incomes, and they are capable of absorbing a lot of units like these.
That would be a good mix for the neighborhood. If the project is completed, this would be the first time the Strip has a strong residential component to it in at least 50 years.
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Old 05-30-2012, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Lawrenceville)
4,711 posts, read 2,554,046 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bradjl2009 View Post
A lot of those homes were built very cheaply by immigrants or for them at the time so there wasn't a lot of quality built into those homes. While it was bad to see so many people get displaced from the Lower Hill, in truth, a lot of those homes were dumps/squalor.
While I know they were nothing special, neither are a number of the homes now gentrified in South Side Flats, or increasingly Lawrenceville. People will rent, or even buy, even modest rowhouses if original architectural features remain.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianTH View Post
The Cork Factory is about 10, I believe, and I think up to there should be safe for the lots behind the Produce Terminal.

Personally I would say you could ramp up to 15 west of the 16th Street Bridge, then up to 20+ west of the Veteran's Bridge, without threatening the existing character of the Strip.
Yeah, it's not like the view of anyone is really being hurt. You couldn't see them from Penn Avenue, and the views on the Hill (or Troy Hill on the other bank) won't be obscured.
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Old 05-30-2012, 09:23 AM
 
1,886 posts, read 1,344,327 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PittsburghLlama View Post
I feel like I'm one of the few here who really enjoy the way the strip district looks currently. I really don't feel that adding 4-15 stories of offices/housing will add "something special" to the strip district. This seems to be a new development though, and I could be wrong. Maybe the construction will be something magnificent and eye-catching.

I just feel that the strip is so beautiful and historic in its own gritty way. I fear that adding these highrise apartments/offices will really change that. I know some will argue that a change is needed, so I guess we'll see.
Agreed. I love the vast swaths of windswept riverfront parking lots and miscellaneous industrial wastelands that compose the Strip District. These attributes really maximize the potential of this area.

Quote:
Originally Posted by squarian View Post
If opposition develops, I do hope it will focus on persuading Buncher to exercise some restraint in the height of the buildings, so the Strip retains its "London" scale rather than a "New York" feel.
There is nothing "London" about the Strip District. Building a bunch of 4-15 story buildings and cramming a thousand new residents there would be a step toward London-izing the neighborhood, however.
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Old 05-30-2012, 09:57 AM
 
4,690 posts, read 1,747,935 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Evergrey View Post
There is nothing "London" about the Strip District. Building a bunch of 4-15 story buildings and cramming a thousand new residents there would be a step toward London-izing the neighborhood, however.
The Strip is very like parts of London actually, Camden Market for example, but I'm referring to the height of buildings and the effect on streetscape - London's are mostly shorter, thanks to an old rule, while New York is better-known for its concrete canyons. The Strip has some taller old warehouses, but for the most part (Docklands and other post-Thatcher era developments excepted) the buildings are only several stories, not a dozen or more - I personally would not welcome a barrier of 15-story apartment blocks strung along Smallman.
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Old 05-30-2012, 10:55 AM
 
20,274 posts, read 17,287,223 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by squarian View Post
I personally would not welcome a barrier of 15-story apartment blocks strung along Smallman.
Worse case scenario, those hypothetical 15-story buildings would be a block north of Smallman east of the 16th Street bridge.
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Old 05-30-2012, 11:39 AM
 
3,313 posts, read 1,811,299 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by squarian View Post
The Strip is very like parts of London actually, Camden Market for example.
we'd have to import loads of punk rockers & build a canal to make it work
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Old 05-30-2012, 01:19 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
1,758 posts, read 2,252,905 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Pittsburgh is sorely lacking right now in residential adjacent to downtown however. It's one of the curious things about downtown boosters. Virtually no one lives in downtown areas like K Street in Washington DC, or the Financial District in Manhattan. They empty out at 5, and people go home, and that's fine.

What Pittsburgh sorely lacks is residential immediately adjacent to downtown. This is because the city, through a series of poor choices, destroyed all of its "neartown" residential in the mid 20th century. The Lower Hill was obliterated for the Civic Arena. The residential at the Point vanished for Gateway Center and Point State Park. And the most accessible portions of the Northside, which formerly had a fair share of residential, were destroyed by highways and other "improvements."

Quite honestly, this is a long time coming. I bike by those vacant lots quite often. It's mind-boggling to me that such a huge area which is only a few blocks from the convention center has been underutilized for so long.
This is exactly right. I applaud the news by Buncher. However, I remember having a discussion about this circa 1988 at Metropol, which was at the time a newly opened club on Smallman. The conversation was basically like "this club is great" "Why is the Strip so underdevelped?" "It makes no sense" "Buncher has been sitting on this property for years" etc. That was nearly a quarter century ago. I am happy things will start to happen "next year." FINALLY!
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Old 05-30-2012, 01:49 PM
 
1,886 posts, read 1,344,327 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by squarian View Post
The Strip is very like parts of London actually, Camden Market for example, but I'm referring to the height of buildings and the effect on streetscape - London's are mostly shorter, thanks to an old rule, while New York is better-known for its concrete canyons.
And yet... the Strip District is not even populated by these shorter London buildings you are using as a bizarre comparison. The "festival market" area of Penn (the area that defines the Strip District in our minds) is largely undistinguished 1-2 story junk... and the rest of the Strip District is composed of parking lots, enormous and architecturally hideous 1-3 story Buncher office buildings along Penn and Liberty, chain link fences, vehicle impoundment lots and blank corrugated warehouses.

photo credits: me





Quote:
Originally Posted by squarian View Post
I personally would not welcome a barrier of 15-story apartment blocks strung along Smallman.
Parking lots are the barriers... not apartment buildings filled with new residents. This long-wasted area immediately adjacent to Downtown now has the opportunity to generate enormous value... the positive externalities of which will be enjoyed by Strip District merchants.
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Old 05-30-2012, 02:10 PM
 
181 posts, read 127,418 times
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Eliminating the unused spaces and parking lot abyss in the strip is a good thing and I think there will be a demand for housing there- as long as the markets will stay open past 4pm. That really needs to change- it's so inconvenient. But I agree- something needs to be done about Liberty Ave too. Grant street is really nice- and then you pass the train station on Liberty and it looks like a bomb exploded 50 years ago and nobody ever cleaned it up.
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Old 05-30-2012, 02:52 PM
 
1,886 posts, read 1,344,327 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mtl-Cns View Post
Eliminating the unused spaces and parking lot abyss in the strip is a good thing and I think there will be a demand for housing there- as long as the markets will stay open past 4pm. That really needs to change- it's so inconvenient. But I agree- something needs to be done about Liberty Ave too. Grant street is really nice- and then you pass the train station on Liberty and it looks like a bomb exploded 50 years ago and nobody ever cleaned it up.
I agree that the 4pm (or earlier) closing times in the Strip is really annoying.

I also agree that Liberty Ave in the Strip is one of the harshest, ugliest streets in the city. Penn is also very harsh east of Penn Ave Fish Company.
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