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Old 07-03-2012, 10:06 PM
 
20,274 posts, read 17,922,507 times
Reputation: 2820
Even if the pace of developing new units picks up further--which I expect, actually--I don't think that is going to radically change the affordability of those new units. As selltheburgh pointed out, the cost of new units requires pretty high rents or selling points (by Pittsburgh standards) to generate an adequate return, and meanwhile there is a lot of job growth in higher-income fields, so there are people willing and able to pay for higher-priced new units.

So looking around for some group to blame--Cranberryites, yinzers, developers, or whoever is the disfavored group of the month--is pretty pointless. The better idea is to figure out what opportunities at a lower price point still exist, whether that might be paying for your own construction, or casting a wider net in terms of locations, or so on.
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Old 07-04-2012, 06:24 AM
 
Location: 15206
1,293 posts, read 794,840 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post
You're right. I should have been house-hunting in the East End when I was 15.
Or you should be looking in other areas. There are still inexpensive houses in the East End. 10-15 years ago Lawrenceville wasn't really pleasant. The were dealers and hookers up and down Butler st. Friendship houses were under 100k, but needed another 100k put into them.

Also, when looking at house prices today you need to consider the monthly payments - especially if you are planning to stay in it for 10+ years. Now is the time to buy the house that you are going to stay in for the next 8-20 years. Not something to hold you over for 3.

A $75,000 mortgage over 30 years at 6% six years ago had a monthly payment of $449 for p&i.

Today a 30 year is around 3.5% and $449 / month gets you a $100,000 mortgage.

Not only that, but the increased affordability and extra equity allows investors or future investors to borrow against their home or other property to buy the extra cheap properties. Plus a pretty healthy real estate market and local economy means a lack of foreclosures, which keeps prices steady.
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Old 07-04-2012, 08:46 AM
 
1,073 posts, read 579,397 times
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h_curtis,

If I was just starting out, I would seriously be looking in Hazelwood. I know it's not the best neighborhood but it's in a good east end location and I think it may be in the Taylor Allderice school dist. At the turn of the 20th century it was a very desirable area to live. It may be a neighborhood you want to put on your radar. I think I'll start a thread for Hazelwood.
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Old 07-06-2012, 07:13 PM
 
359 posts, read 296,844 times
Reputation: 116
Short answer: there is space, the city used to house double its current population.
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Old 07-06-2012, 07:34 PM
 
1,073 posts, read 579,397 times
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Rodeno,

Back in the day, families would double and triple up. It wasn't unusual for several members of an extended family to live in one structure. I wonder if people are willing to do that today. Another interesting point was many inner city houses, in areas we now consider desirable, still had outhouses up until the early 1950s. Houses were heated by coal in large cast iron stoves in the kitchens and hot bricks were placed in beds to warm them in the winter. These are the type of houses the 700,000 lived in.
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Old 07-06-2012, 09:17 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
4,186 posts, read 2,645,435 times
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I was looking at the 1940 Census and I seen that 5 people lived in my tiny 12 ft wide row house in that year, and 7 lived in the home next door here in L'ville.

Today, I live alone and one person lives next door.

No wonder why the population was so much higher then, the people were packed in like sardines.
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Old 08-24-2012, 09:30 PM
 
Location: Metro - Pittsburgh
84 posts, read 64,486 times
Reputation: 96
What does Pittsburgh need to do in order to be one of the top ten populated cities in the US ??
Simple merge the county with the city, Allegheny County as a whole becomes the City and County of Pittsburgh. No longer 130 municipalities in an area of only 745 sq miles. By doing this, Pittsburgh increases its federal contributions and distinguishes itself as a major city. Many cities including Philadelphia and San Francisco have done this. One police and fire department makes sense in the county. There is only one wall blocking this in my opinion and it is the fear of parents in the suburbs of destroying their coveted school districts. The school districts could be maintained if approved. Luke get with Fitzgerald and make it happen. Lets become a proggressive city.




Moderator cut: copyrighted photos removed





Last edited by Yac; 08-27-2012 at 05:24 AM..
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Old 08-24-2012, 11:38 PM
Status: "Fall is in the air-too soon!" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
68,599 posts, read 57,229,522 times
Reputation: 19412
Oh, not this again!

The City and County of San Franscisco is about 47 square miles. It's smaller than Pittsburgh! Philadelphia County is 134 sqare miles. There aren't many city-county governments of counties as large as Allegheny. Even Jefferson County, KY (Louisville), which has some sort of a metro government with some still-independent communities is 340 sm.
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Old 08-25-2012, 04:44 AM
 
20,274 posts, read 17,922,507 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Oh, not this again!
Yes, you obviously just HATE discussing it.
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Old 08-25-2012, 05:31 AM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
26,087 posts, read 45,298,359 times
Reputation: 10959
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Oh, not this again!

The City and County of San Franscisco is about 47 square miles. It's smaller than Pittsburgh! Philadelphia County is 134 sqare miles. There aren't many city-county governments of counties as large as Allegheny. Even Jefferson County, KY (Louisville), which has some sort of a metro government with some still-independent communities is 340 sm.
Fairfax County, Virginia is 407 square miles in area with a population of around 1.1 million (about 20% of Metro DC's population) and has very effective county-wide municipal services that is supplemented by only a select few independent towns that choose to have their own governments and related services (i.e. City of Falls Church, Town of Herndon, etc.)

Allegheny County, Pennsylvania is 745 square miles in area with a population of just over 1.2 million. I fully believe that the county could effectively provide municipal services in the same manner that Fairfax County does. Obviously Fairfax County is a sprawling suburban area with no principal city of Pittsburgh's stature, but with that being said I feel as if the county could be split in half for municipal services purposes with perhaps a North Allegheny district encompassing everything north and east of the Monongahela and Ohio rivers and a South Allegheny district encompassing the rest with Pittsburgh (and perhaps a few other well-established areas such as McKeesport, Mt. Lebanon, and Sewickley) continuing to retain their own individual services.
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