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Old 07-22-2012, 12:38 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Lawrenceville)
4,986 posts, read 2,844,701 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopes View Post
These maps might help the OP.




And this map below delineates the population demographics for the city of Pittsburgh neighborhoods.

Google Image Result for http://img.docstoccdn.com/thumb/orig/44290044.png

I can't get it to load so you'll have to click on the link.
I'd hesitate to suggest the OP move to a black neighborhood in the city solely to feel more comfortable.

First, most of the elementary schools which draw in black neighborhoods are not "diverse" - they are mostly 90%+ black. Even the best of the black neighborhood schools, Manchester, is 87% black. They are far less diverse than the city schools for white neighborhoods, which now tend to be 30%-50% black and 30%-50% white, with a leavening biracial, Hispanic, and Asian kids.
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Old 07-22-2012, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Lawrenceville)
4,986 posts, read 2,844,701 times
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Oh, and it should also be noted that Pittsburgh has a great magnet school program which you can get your children into via lottery. People often use the magnet system if they want to stay in a neighborhood which has cruddy neighborhood schools, and students of all races tend to score as highly within the magnets as the most elite public schools in the suburbs.

I have heard it is easier to get your children into the magnet system if you move here when they are older, versus locals who apply when they are in kindergarten. Also, you do get extra points if one kid is already in the system, which make it more likely their siblings will get in.

That said, with four kids it's a big risk to take, as even one going to the bad neighborhood school may be intolerable. If you were to go that route, I'd suggest living somewhere with acceptable, but not stellar neighborhood schools (say Brookline or Beechview in the south of the city), and looking at acceptance into the magnet system as a plus, but not a given, for any kids who successfully get in.
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Old 07-22-2012, 12:57 PM
 
41,694 posts, read 46,081,436 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I'd hesitate to suggest the OP move to a black neighborhood in the city solely to feel more comfortable.

First, most of the elementary schools which draw in black neighborhoods are not "diverse" - they are mostly 90%+ black. Even the best of the black neighborhood schools, Manchester, is 87% black. They are far less diverse than the city schools for white neighborhoods, which now tend to be 30%-50% black and 30%-50% white, with a leavening biracial, Hispanic, and Asian kids.
I'm not recommending that she move into a predominantly black neighborhood.

I provided the maps so she could gain an understanding of how pittsburgh's black population is more self segregated than disbursed.
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Old 07-22-2012, 03:14 PM
 
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An area like North Point Breeze could be a great choice, assuming it was within budget.
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Old 07-22-2012, 03:27 PM
 
1,053 posts, read 935,617 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackbeauty212 View Post
and its feeder neighborhood of Squirrel Hill is the most diverse neighborhood in the city.
I often see people on here saying that Squirrel Hill is the "most diverse" neighborhood in the city. I'm just curious: Based on what criteria? Are we talking solely about racial diversity, or socioeconomic, or what?

It seems to me that there are a lot of neighborhoods with substantially more racial parity. Off the top of my head, neighborhoods that have more substantial African-American populations than Squirrel Hill while still being either a majority white, or close to any even split: Brightwood, Observatory Hill, Spring Garden, Mexican War Streets, Deutschtown, Upper Lawrenceville, Mt. Oliver, Arlington, Allentown, Stanton Heights, and various parts of the West End.
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Old 07-22-2012, 04:06 PM
 
4,633 posts, read 4,483,010 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopes View Post
True. I simply used the word segregated to explain that most neighborhoods are either a greater majority white or a greater majority black.
Only neighborhoods that are majority Blacks are the impoverished Ghettos...Working Class/Middle Class Blacks have no problem and very much do assimilate and live within predominately white neighborhoods...As does the Asians, Indians, and Latino's (the little of them that there are)...

You remove the Ghetto element, then nearly all of Pittsburgh neighborhoods are predominately White.

Again Pittsburgh being majority White does not equal segregation.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopes View Post

I provided the maps so she could gain an understanding of how pittsburgh's black population is more self segregated than disbursed.

Again with this "Segregation" bit.......All you've done is outlined where Pittsburgh poorest impoverished ghettos are.....Its nothing outside of the norm, any city you go to and Blacks make up the majority living in poverty. What makes Pittsburgh any different????
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Old 07-22-2012, 04:11 PM
 
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There could be definitions of diversity on which that isn't true, but Squirrel Hill has diversity in terms of ethnicity (not just black/white but also other non-whites), religion, age, socioeconomic status, place of birth, and so on.
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Old 07-22-2012, 04:14 PM
 
4,633 posts, read 4,483,010 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steindle View Post
I often see people on here saying that Squirrel Hill is the "most diverse" neighborhood in the city. I'm just curious: Based on what criteria? Are we talking solely about racial diversity, or socioeconomic, or what?

It seems to me that there are a lot of neighborhoods with substantially more racial parity. Off the top of my head, neighborhoods that have more substantial African-American populations than Squirrel Hill while still being either a majority white, or close to any even split: Brightwood, Observatory Hill, Spring Garden, Mexican War Streets, Deutschtown, Upper Lawrenceville, Mt. Oliver, Arlington, Allentown, Stanton Heights, and various parts of the West End.
Squirrel Hill is considered the most diverse because it bring together this melting-pot of Races, Ethnicities, and Lifestyles to a single neighborhood.
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Old 07-22-2012, 05:35 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
4,164 posts, read 2,636,156 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackbeauty212 View Post
Only neighborhoods that are majority Blacks are the impoverished Ghettos...Working Class/Middle Class Blacks have no problem and very much do assimilate and live within predominately white neighborhoods...As does the Asians, Indians, and Latino's (the little of them that there are)...

You remove the Ghetto element, then nearly all of Pittsburgh neighborhoods are predominately White.

Again Pittsburgh being majority White does not equal segregation.





Again with this "Segregation" bit.......All you've done is outlined where Pittsburgh poorest impoverished ghettos are.....Its nothing outside of the norm, any city you go to and Blacks make up the majority living in poverty. What makes Pittsburgh any different????

Pittsburgh has several majority white neighborhoods which look like on paper they are well-integrated, Sheraden, Mt. Oliver, Knoxville, Allentown, but are still "strictly ghetto" and I'd be pretty cautious about going there and would think twice before renting/buying there.

I think the OP would be well advised to look to solid middle class areas and realize the days of real segregation are long gone around here.
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Old 07-22-2012, 06:41 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Lawrenceville)
4,986 posts, read 2,844,701 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopes View Post
I provided the maps so she could gain an understanding of how pittsburgh's black population is more self segregated than disbursed.
Pittsburgh is actually slightly less segregated than NYC in regards to the black population, IIRC.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianTH View Post
An area like North Point Breeze could be a great choice, assuming it was within budget.
Yep. Keep in mind though that a small portion of Point Breeze goes to Homewood schools. Basically just a cul-de sac off of Penn Avenue by the East End Co Op, along with one block directly across from the county PD. It's unlikely one of these houses will be on sale, but I wouldn't want to steer you wrong.

Quote:
Originally Posted by steindle View Post
I often see people on here saying that Squirrel Hill is the "most diverse" neighborhood in the city. I'm just curious: Based on what criteria? Are we talking solely about racial diversity, or socioeconomic, or what?

It seems to me that there are a lot of neighborhoods with substantially more racial parity. Off the top of my head, neighborhoods that have more substantial African-American populations than Squirrel Hill while still being either a majority white, or close to any even split: Brightwood, Observatory Hill, Spring Garden, Mexican War Streets, Deutschtown, Upper Lawrenceville, Mt. Oliver, Arlington, Allentown, Stanton Heights, and various parts of the West End.
I think people mean by diverse that even though it is majority-white, Squirrel Hill has a minor leavening of people from across the globe - black, Asian, even a few Hispanics. Virtually everywhere else in Pittsburgh is strictly black and white - and mainly native-born at that.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackbeauty212 View Post
Only neighborhoods that are majority Blacks are the impoverished Ghettos...Working Class/Middle Class Blacks have no problem and very much do assimilate and live within predominately white neighborhoods...As does the Asians, Indians, and Latino's (the little of them that there are)...

You remove the Ghetto element, then nearly all of Pittsburgh neighborhoods are predominately White.
I may be reading you wrong here, but you seem to be implying Pittsburgh does not have middle-class black enclaves. While it's true we can't hold a candle to NYC, DC, or even Chicago or Oakland, CA in terms of having solid middle-class black areas, there are several. Manchester is definitely attracting the bulk of the "buppie" contingent. Crawford Square has been a pretty big success in terms of what it is as well. In addition, there are non-ghetto black areas like the Upper Hill, southern Stanton Heights, Chartiers City, northern Windgap, and some outer portions of East Hills and Lincoln-Lemington Belmar. A lot of them are in slight decline, they still feed to schools with awful test scores, and few new young black families want to move there, but they are fairly stable and as safe as any other non-ghetto part of the city.
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