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Old 10-16-2007, 07:15 AM
 
2,439 posts, read 5,695,664 times
Reputation: 894
When highly qualified teachers cannot find a position in the Pittsburgh area, that tells you something about the strength of the local economy.
Beth Ann is absolutely right to be concerned about her husband's chance of finding a good position should his initial job not work out. The Pittsburgh economy is not nearly as strong and diverse as in other cities, and everyone whose head is not in the sand knows this.
"Don't confuse economy with jobs, they aren't necessarily the same thing"? What sort of nonsense is that? A strong economy creates good jobs. A weak economy does not. That's how it works.
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Old 10-16-2007, 07:23 AM
 
2,902 posts, read 6,692,313 times
Reputation: 392
Quote:
When highly qualified teachers cannot find a position in the Pittsburgh area, that tells you something about the strength of the local economy.
Actually this is solely due to the fact the supply severely outstrips demand in the Pittsburgh teacher market due to the strong labor unions in the area (which isn't necessarily a good thing, but it's got nothing to do with the economy).
Quote:
"Don't confuse economy with jobs, they aren't necessarily the same thing"? What sort of nonsense is that? A strong economy creates good jobs. A weak economy does not. That's how it works.
Go back to economics class. That CAN be how it works, but it isn't a law of nature and isn't necessarily true. Companies are downscaling all the time due to innovation, automation, and transformation. That's a loss of jobs and an increase in production. That's only one example. During Bush's term, there have been several times when the country saw job loss yet still had growing economic output.
Quote:
Beth Ann is absolutely right to be concerned about her husband's chance of finding a good position should his initial job not work o
I never said otherwise at all. I agree completely. Maybe if she said, "The Pittsburgh economy isn't as strong as certain areas of the country" I would have let it slip. But the "Pittsburgh economy is sooooooo bad" is just blatantly not true and is misrepresentative.
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Old 10-16-2007, 07:28 AM
 
237 posts, read 570,690 times
Reputation: 115
The Giant Eagle (aka The Dirty Bird) at the Corner of Melwood and Center actually closed a year or two ago.

A long time ago, I live just up Melwood from that store (less than half a block away). I remember the cops working security there, but I don't ever remember them having a dog with them.

In fact, the only German Shepards I do remember were the two that belonged to the homeless guy who hung around out back. The manager let him feed the dogs out of the dumpster. I even remember once the manager telling off this old lady from the neighborhood who was complaining about those dogs. The manager always defended the guy & his dogs. I think there was a mutual understanding betweent the manager & the homeless guy.

I find it really ridiculous that it is just assumed that folks can hop on a bus and go to Whole Foods, Market District, or Trader Joes. For one thing, if you are coming from the Hill, those places are pretty far to be busing back with groceries. Second, they are so expensive, many in those neighborhoods can't afford them. I couldn't when I lived there and I still couldn't today.

The Foodland in Bloomfield is now called Shur-Save and I am a staunch supporter of it. It is not a chain, but a distribution company that allows the grocery store owner to operate independently (as opposed the the franchise or corporate stores). This gives the owner the freedom to set their own prices and specials, carry items/brands they want, tailor the store to fit the neighborhood, etc. Owners can even use whatever name they want for the store - allowing some old family groceries to maintain their identity. It lets the owner make the customer happy.

I am actually closer to another store - the Giant Eagle in Lawrenceville - but I'm not a big fan. I find it much more expensive than Shur-Save, while not any cleaner and definitely not as well-staffed. Also, they do not carry many items that I use.
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Old 10-16-2007, 08:02 AM
Status: "Corn well over knee high!" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
67,309 posts, read 54,914,303 times
Reputation: 18711
Quote:
Originally Posted by boylocke View Post
Actually this is solely due to the fact the supply severely outstrips demand in the Pittsburgh teacher market due to the strong labor unions in the area (which isn't necessarily a good thing, but it's got nothing to do with the economy).
This is not the sole reason. It is part of the reason. Another part to that is the school age population is declining. There was a recent article in either the Beaver County Times or the Post-Gazette (can't remember which) about the continuing decline in the number of students. Declining numbers of students is a proxy variable for the strength of the eonomy. Fewer school-age children means fewer adult workers. It may be many years, if at all, until that changes.
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Old 10-16-2007, 08:10 AM
 
2,902 posts, read 6,692,313 times
Reputation: 392
Quote:
This is not the sole reason. It is part of the reason. Another part to that is the school age population is declining. There was a recent article in either the Beaver County Times or the Post-Gazette (can't remember which) about the continuing decline in the number of students. Declining numbers of students is a proxy variable for the strength of the eonomy.
I stand corrected. However, proxy variable isn't good enough, and that theory was dubious at best. The entire country (I think world) is seeing a decrease in birth rates and the economy is still growing. It's when us youngsters have to sustain all the old baby boomers that there will be a problem!!!!

The Pittsburgh economy IS growing. We have positive numbers. That is an indisputable fact. Are they as strong as sun-belt cities or outpacing the national average? No. But I've never claimed that.

All this stems from is me claiming that the Pittsburgh economy is not "soooo bad," which it isn't. We can debate on just how "not bad" it is all day, that's not the arguement.
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Old 10-16-2007, 08:27 AM
Status: "Corn well over knee high!" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
67,309 posts, read 54,914,303 times
Reputation: 18711
Quote:
Originally Posted by boylocke View Post
I stand corrected. However, proxy variable isn't good enough, and that theory was dubious at best. The entire country (I think world) is seeing a decrease in birth rates and the economy is still growing. It's when us youngsters have to sustain all the old baby boomers that there will be a problem!!!!
Point taken. However, the decline in students is not just the decline in birth rates, which haven't dropped all that much among child-bearing women. It is the decline in women of child-bearing age in that area. You can argue through time and eternity WHY there are fewer women of child-bearing age, but the fact is what it is. Perhaps it has something to do with the economy.
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Old 10-16-2007, 08:36 AM
 
2,902 posts, read 6,692,313 times
Reputation: 392
Quote:
You can argue through time and eternity WHY there are fewer women of child-bearing age, but the fact is what it is. Perhaps it has something to do with the economy.
Perhaps!! I seriously have no idea why. LOL. And then again, on another point, the higher education enrollment is higher than ever. It's all up for debate, I guess. :P
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Old 10-16-2007, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Leesburg
799 posts, read 634,596 times
Reputation: 232
To the extent that the economic struggles correlate with the lack of international migration to Pittsburgh is the sum of the linkage between the economy and declining birth rates. Many shrinking cities in Europe have robust economies, but most of the countries in the EU have a zero immigration policy.

The great Pittsburgh irony is that there is a glut of talent (e.g. school teachers), while other regions are desperate for this labor. Utah is a good example of a strong economy starving for talent.

If you take away international migration, the San Jose-San Fran MSA (includes Silicon Valley) would be the biggest loser in the domestic migration game and the declining birth rates would be a global story.
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Old 10-16-2007, 10:28 AM
 
743 posts, read 1,481,900 times
Reputation: 230
I also read somewhere that the Pgh area has one of the highest and fastest growing populations of elderly residents....maybe only second in the country to some locations in Florida.

An increasing elderly pop may be another "nail in the coffin" for Pgh economy/jobs/growth, etc.
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Old 10-16-2007, 10:32 AM
 
2,902 posts, read 6,692,313 times
Reputation: 392
Quote:
I also read somewhere that the Pgh area has one of the highest and fastest growing populations of elderly residents....maybe only second in the country to some locations in Florida.
That's true.
Quote:
An increasing elderly pop may be another "nail in the coffin" for Pgh economy/jobs/growth, etc
Now think about what you just said. An aging population is not a super good thing, believe me, but don't you think a lot of these people aging and retiring will clear the way for more jobs?
Quote:
An increasing elderly pop may be another "nail in the coffin" for Pgh economy/jobs/growth, etc.
You aren't seeing the point at all. There is no "nail in the coffin." Pittsburgh isn't heading backwards it's heading forwards. LOL. We have had positive growth and surplus for years now. The time for "nail in the coffin" is long past. Pittsburgh isn't a crumbling city just waiting for that last straw, it's turned a corner and the worst is behind us. Does that mean our economy is booming and that we're sailing high and clear? No, of course not. But the nail is long gone. haha.
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