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Old 10-10-2007, 11:45 AM
 
666 posts, read 1,309,299 times
Reputation: 355

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I see a lot of people griping about Pittsburgh politics on here, and I agree in large part with many of the complaints, especially the unfavorable tax structure for entering corporations. In response, I ask one simple question:

In an attempt to put aside your natural propensity to vote for one or two main personal issues, what advice can you give me as to what is the best way to vote in order to create a favorable environment for new businesses to enter the Pittsburgh region and boost the economy? (both locally and nationally if possible)

P.S. Advice only, please. Lets not get into a heated debate over this.
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Old 10-10-2007, 12:22 PM
 
2,902 posts, read 7,053,868 times
Reputation: 398
Quote:
especially the unfavorable tax structure for entering corporations.
Thankfully, just in the last year or so, a lot of these taxes have been changed for the better and more are planned. We'll see what happens. In fact, certain taxes in Pennsylvania that were unfavorable to companies changed last year. The capital stock and franchise tax was decreased to 4.89 mills from 4.99 mills, retroactive to the beginning of 2006, as part of a gradual phase out of the tax. And, the increased research and development tax credit, whose cap increased from $30 million to $40 million, took effect on June 30.

Last edited by guylocke; 10-10-2007 at 12:31 PM..
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Old 10-10-2007, 09:47 PM
 
Location: Erie, PA
714 posts, read 1,300,760 times
Reputation: 177
A lot of Pittsburgh's problems are due to policies of at the state level. I've found the following site helpful. There is even a link that shows how to contact your state assembly representatives.

Pittsburgh's Future - Issues and opportunities affecting Pittsburgh and Southwestern Pennsylvania
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Old 10-11-2007, 07:34 AM
 
666 posts, read 1,309,299 times
Reputation: 355
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I've found the following site helpful
Wow, great site! Exactly what I was looking for. Thanks so much!
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Old 10-11-2007, 07:59 AM
 
51 posts, read 5,238 times
Reputation: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by kpoeppel View Post
A lot of Pittsburgh's problems are due to policies of at the state level. I've found the following site helpful. There is even a link that shows how to contact your state assembly representatives.

Pittsburgh's Future - Issues and opportunities affecting Pittsburgh and Southwestern Pennsylvania
It seems like the State has put the Pittsburgh region out to pasture in many ways. I wonder why that is?
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Old 10-11-2007, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Erie, PA
714 posts, read 1,300,760 times
Reputation: 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by 505ci View Post
It seems like the State has put the Pittsburgh region out to pasture in many ways. I wonder why that is?
I think it has to do with Philadelphia having most of the clout. Add to it the fact that Harrisburg is in eastern PA.
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Old 10-11-2007, 02:44 PM
 
57,972 posts, read 29,557,902 times
Reputation: 7343
Quote:
Originally Posted by gallacus View Post
I see a lot of people griping about Pittsburgh politics on here, and I agree in large part with many of the complaints, especially the unfavorable tax structure for entering corporations. In response, I ask one simple question:

In an attempt to put aside your natural propensity to vote for one or two main personal issues, what advice can you give me as to what is the best way to vote in order to create a favorable environment for new businesses to enter the Pittsburgh region and boost the economy? (both locally and nationally if possible)

P.S. Advice only, please. Lets not get into a heated debate over this.
I'll be packing my bags shortly.. Cant wait to move..
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Old 10-11-2007, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
26,562 posts, read 47,325,077 times
Reputation: 11441
Quote:
Originally Posted by pghquest View Post
I'll be packing my bags shortly.. Cant wait to move..
...from Pittsburgh...to Scranton? (Fingers crossed!!!) LOL! Just kidding!

Last edited by SteelCityRising; 10-11-2007 at 02:47 PM.. Reason: Typo
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Old 10-11-2007, 10:00 PM
 
Location: Erie, PA
714 posts, read 1,300,760 times
Reputation: 177
gallacus,

To give you my two cents on your original question:

Traditionally, republicans have been for lower taxes and lower spending. Thus IMO they would be better suited to create a more favorable tax and business climate. We had a republican Governor, Tom Ridge, but not a whole lot changed. Now we have "Fast Eddie" Rendell, who's proven himself to be for more of the same: high taxes and wasteful spending. His latest proposal is to toll I-80 and give the money to the grossly-inefficent and corrupt transit authorities in Philly and Pittsburgh. Ed Rendell recently beat republican candidate Lynn Swann, so that shows you where the general population stands with regard to their political beliefs.

That said, I think the only way to change Pittsburgh and PA is to educate people on how our economy compares with the economy of other states (especially the booming states in the South), and how much better our economy could be. People also need to realize that the sacred-cow of organized labor is making the cost of government services much higher than it should be. After all, public-sector unions aren't taking extra money from ultra-rich robber-barons, they're taking it from the public...their neighbors!

So *IF* a person can get into a public-sector union in PA, they've got it made...with wages and benefits far better than the free-market would dictate. Everyone else is stuck with a lousy economy, teacher strikes, transit strikes, and high taxes.
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Old 10-11-2007, 10:04 PM
 
2,902 posts, read 7,053,868 times
Reputation: 398
Quote:
His latest proposal is to toll I-80 and give the money to the grossly-inefficent and corrupt transit authorities in Philly and Pittsburgh.
What?? That's definitely an opinion. Have you actually looked in depth at the proposal for taxing I-80? I'm all for it after reading it.
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