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Old 02-18-2013, 10:35 AM
 
1,183 posts, read 1,926,291 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post
Is sarcasm the best you can do at a reply?
I think that you shoehorn the alleged "East End housing crisis" into an almost comical array of threads, so I made a hugely inoffensive joke about it. I'd be happy to further pursue this in a completely non-sarcastic and painfully verbose manner if you'd like.
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Old 02-18-2013, 10:38 AM
 
Location: North by Northwest
7,768 posts, read 10,757,738 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steindle View Post
I think that you shoehorn the alleged "East End housing crisis" into an almost comical array of threads, so I made a hugely inoffensive joke about it. I'd be happy to further pursue this in a completely non-sarcastic and painfully verbose manner if you'd like.
Ah, a reenactment of the famous dueling keyboards scene from Yinzeriverance.
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Old 02-18-2013, 10:45 AM
 
1,642 posts, read 1,369,410 times
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I gave up ragging on SCR's east end housing marking obsession for Lent, which I may or may not stick to, but getting back to the topic:
The article also suggested community gardens. I've known these to be quite successful in other areas, especially those that are "food deserts" - the applications for plot space fills up very quickly. You'd be surprised what people will do for a good tomato. I've also known quite successful farmers' markets to take place in what would be considered unlikely parts of town. Commercial agriculture might not happen, but a lot of small experimental pop-up projects have turned into something decent before. These are the kinds of things that bring community to an area and make it someplace that a person would take a second look at. I see no reason to believe that leaving the area alone and waiting on properties values/perceptions to improve is likely to have much positive effect; an area can be "right on the verge" of recovery for 20-30 years.
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Old 02-18-2013, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Crafton via San Francisco
3,463 posts, read 4,142,901 times
Reputation: 1594
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeavenWood View Post
This isn't sarcasm, but I do think you've been getting over-the-top with this housing crunch stuff. Rents and property values are certainly up from what they once were, but it's been more a steady creep than a drastic spike for the most part. Also, Pittsburgh is still an incredibly affordable city relative to what it offers. It's COL-QOL ratio is simply moving on from "steal territory" to "bargain land."
You're absolutely right. As someone coming from a place with a very real housing crunch, there is a difference between prices rising as an area improves and double digit percentage increases on a quarterly basis.

For example, I rented my place in SF in 2011 for $2100 a month which included $50 a month for a parking space. My rent is now $2300 a month including parking. Thanks to rent control they can only raise it a certain percentage annually. If I were to rent the same place today it would be $2900 plus $150 for parking. I know the amount because the rental office posts prices online.

BTW, it's a 2bdr, 1 ba 1940s townhouse that could use some updating. No laundry hook-ups. Have to use the laundromat.
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Old 02-18-2013, 10:46 AM
 
1,642 posts, read 1,369,410 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HeavenWood View Post
Ah, a reenactment of the famous dueling keyboards scene from Yinzeriverance.
I missed that segment. I have got to stop watching the sanitized versions on the USA network.
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Old 02-18-2013, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Crafton via San Francisco
3,463 posts, read 4,142,901 times
Reputation: 1594
Quote:
Originally Posted by sealie View Post
I gave up ragging on SCR's east end housing marking obsession for Lent, which I may or may not stick to, but getting back to the topic:
The article also suggested community gardens. I've known these to be quite successful in other areas, especially those that are "food deserts" - the applications for plot space fills up very quickly. You'd be surprised what people will do for a good tomato. I've also known quite successful farmers' markets to take place in what would be considered unlikely parts of town. Commercial agriculture might not happen, but a lot of small experimental pop-up projects have turned into something decent before. These are the kinds of things that bring community to an area and make it someplace that a person would take a second look at. I see no reason to believe that leaving the area alone and waiting on properties values/perceptions to improve is likely to have much positive effect; an area can be "right on the verge" of recovery for 20-30 years.
Community gardens can really transform an area. It will be interesting to see what develops. I know that Detroit is considering commercial farming because they have acres of land available. Doesn't seem like Pittsburgh has the large swaths of acreage that Detroit does.
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Old 02-18-2013, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
6,116 posts, read 7,882,703 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by juliegt View Post
Community gardens can really transform an area.
I agree. It would be nice to see some more around, especially since the high price of housing in the East End means that I can't afford to buy my neighbor's house and push it over to get a bigger yard. It's a real housing crunch out there.
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Old 02-18-2013, 11:21 AM
 
Location: ɥbɹnqsʇʇıd
4,601 posts, read 6,067,015 times
Reputation: 3516
I really don't think $50k for 10 neighborhoods for "green" purposes is going to have any positive impact whatsoever. Personally I would much rather see the basics get handled first (fixing the horrible roads and sidewalks, cleaning up the trash) before a community garden.

Also I don't see a big influx of people into hilltop neighborhoods any time soon. The reason why the East and the South Side expanded in terms of population is because those places are hip and have all sorts of attractions you won't find in any hilltop neighborhood.

Then again we got a dairy up here even though there's no cows, so there's that.
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Old 02-18-2013, 11:31 AM
 
281 posts, read 297,838 times
Reputation: 810
Quote:
I think that you shoehorn the alleged "East End housing crisis," your "extremely severe" automobile accident, and NOVA mediocrity into an almost comical array of threads, so I made a hugely inoffensive joke about it.
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Old 02-18-2013, 11:31 AM
 
43,012 posts, read 98,723,493 times
Reputation: 30528
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeavenWood View Post
This isn't sarcasm, but I do think you've been getting over-the-top with this housing crunch stuff. Rents and property values are certainly up from what they once were, but it's been more a steady creep than a drastic spike for the most part. Also, Pittsburgh is still an incredibly affordable city relative to what it offers. It's COL-QOL ratio is simply moving on from "steal territory" to "bargain land."
I agree and disagree. Rental prices have increased more dramatically for low income households. I have a two friends who are being priced out of places they lived comfortably for many years. If you can't afford to live in Turtle Creek or Etna on 30k within just a few years, there's a problem. SCR is in their income range (they both have children). He's feeling the same crunch. He just wants an affordable place in a safe neighborhood, as do my friends.

Quote:
Originally Posted by juliegt View Post
You're absolutely right. As someone coming from a place with a very real housing crunch, there is a difference between prices rising as an area improves and double digit percentage increases on a quarterly basis.

For example, I rented my place in SF in 2011 for $2100 a month which included $50 a month for a parking space. My rent is now $2300 a month including parking. Thanks to rent control they can only raise it a certain percentage annually. If I were to rent the same place today it would be $2900 plus $150 for parking. I know the amount because the rental office posts prices online.

BTW, it's a 2bdr, 1 ba 1940s townhouse that could use some updating. No laundry hook-ups. Have to use the laundromat.
Even though Pittsburgh rents are lower than SF, there's still a substantial increase happening here. Your increase of $2100 to $2300 over two years is much lower percentagewise than my friends' increases from $500 to $750 over the past two years. Even without rent control, $2900 is a lower percentage increase.

Pittsburgh doesn't have rent control. People are feeling it. I suspect there will be a lot of suffering before Pittsburgh does rent control if it ever does. Pittsburghers aren't earning the same salaries as people in high cost of living areas. There's a quality of life difference too. In high cost of living areas, low income typically rent rooms in houses instead of their own apartments. In Pittsburgh, low income were able to easily rent their own apartments. That's going to change very soon.
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