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Old 01-25-2008, 10:33 AM
 
740 posts, read 1,394,754 times
Reputation: 269
Quote:
Originally Posted by gallacus View Post
I think Pittsburghers do have a tendency to paint a doom and gloom future for the city, and most people will tell you that the city is going to continue to lose population for a while. The emergence of high tech jobs and more cultural amenities than ever before will, in my opinion, prove them wrong.
I want to be proven wrong. I love this city so much and I wish it would just be booming everywhere attracting thousands of tech-workers per year, revitalizing all of the old city neighborhoods, and funding mass transit and the arts.

A guy can wish though
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Old 01-25-2008, 10:37 AM
 
20,274 posts, read 17,277,226 times
Reputation: 2801
Just an additional thought, but I for one wouldn't mind seeing Pittsburgh stabilize as a relatively low growth city, even if that means it continues to slowly slip down the relative rankings of metropolitan areas by population over the next few decades. High population growth in an area is not necessarily conducive to a higher quality of life for the existing residents of that area, and it certainly isn't conducive to a low cost of living. And in Pittsburgh in particular, we have a great legacy in terms of things like sports, cultural institutions, housing stock, and so on, which the current residents effectively get to share on a per capita basis. But obviously those shares would decrease if Pittsburgh was a high growth area.

Of course the key word there is "stabilize", because cities do need a certain critical mass to support the kinds of institutions, services, and so on currently available in Pittsburgh. But as others have noted, the situation does seem to have largely stabilized already, and there certainly seem to be a lot of expensive projects in the works which are effectively betting on Pittsburgh remaining a healthy, if not exactly booming, urban center.
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Old 01-25-2008, 10:39 AM
 
2,902 posts, read 6,697,322 times
Reputation: 393
Quote:
I'm going to have to agree with guylocke...
You make it sound like it pains you!!
Quote:
Just an additional thought, but I for one wouldn't mind seeing Pittsburgh stabilize as a relatively low growth city, even if that means it continues to slowly slip down the relative rankings of metropolitan areas by population over the next few decades. High population growth in an area is not necessarily conducive to a higher quality of life for the existing residents of that area, and it certainly isn't conducive to a low cost of living.
I agree 100%.
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Old 01-25-2008, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Westmoreland Co.
200 posts, read 531,841 times
Reputation: 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianTH View Post
High population growth in an area is not necessarily conducive to a higher quality of life for the existing residents of that area, and it certainly isn't conducive to a low cost of living.
Absolutely agree.

Ask the lifelong North Carolina folks how happy they are with all the unchecked new growth . Sure, home values are increasing, but quality of life is suffering greatly. I saw this first hand when I lived in Utah, and a CA exodus to Utah was in full swing. My rent went up $250/month over a 2 year span, and our landlord gave us a break for being good tenants . We were in the small town of Orem, paying $800/month for a small 2 bed/1 bath house back in 1994/95 before we left. Traffic/crime was getting a lot worse as well.

Slow and steadily upward is how I hope Pittsburgh remains, and if it all works out, chalk up a "+3" for my family to the inbound column soon .
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Old 01-25-2008, 11:24 AM
 
Location: Work is based nationwide
570 posts, read 875,397 times
Reputation: 132
I will take slow population growth with a stable to growing economic base any day! My day's of living in chaos filled high growth south florida gave me enough evidence of the bad side of such growth rates.
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Old 01-25-2008, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
2,026 posts, read 2,400,710 times
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I'm all for slow and steady growth as well. Hopefully, we'll get to that point in a few years. I think we have a good base to work from now: a much more diversified economy, good growing industries adding workers, and a pretty good infrastructure (considering). I don't think any city in the northeast or midwest will ever be a boomtown like the south or west, at least until they start running out of water, but that probably won't be in our lifetimes.
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Old 01-25-2008, 12:10 PM
 
666 posts, read 1,219,592 times
Reputation: 354
Quote:
Originally Posted by guylocke View Post
You make it sound like it pains you!!
Ha ha! That must have come out wrong... I usually do agree with you.
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Old 01-25-2008, 12:34 PM
 
20,274 posts, read 17,277,226 times
Reputation: 2801
Yet another idle thought: one of the few ways I could see Pittsburgh becoming something of a boom town again is if high-speed rail took off in the United States. That's a big "if" of course, but I have seen it suggested that high-speed rail in the United States could make economic sense for trips of up to 600 or so miles, with the possible corridors including Texas, California, Florida, Boston-DC (already in existence to some extent), and Chicago-Pittsburgh. That last possibility alone would help draw growth to Pittsburgh, and if Pittsburgh ever got a high speed link to the East Coast it could really take off.

But again, high-speed rail like this may never happen.

Last edited by BrianTH; 01-25-2008 at 01:42 PM..
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Old 01-25-2008, 02:58 PM
 
Location: Work is based nationwide
570 posts, read 875,397 times
Reputation: 132
BrianTH, I have heard the manufacturing for high speed rail and Maglav technology would be something Pittsburgh would jump on. The manufacturing base is in place and the technology of CMU and Westinghouse would supposedly play into making Pittsburgh a center for such.
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Old 01-25-2008, 03:21 PM
 
20,274 posts, read 17,277,226 times
Reputation: 2801
Quote:
Originally Posted by RockLobster View Post
BrianTH, I have heard the manufacturing for high speed rail and Maglav technology would be something Pittsburgh would jump on. The manufacturing base is in place and the technology of CMU and Westinghouse would supposedly play into making Pittsburgh a center for such.
I have heard the same thing. And if we actually went for new tracks, as opposed to Acela-style upgrades on existing tracks, you could be talking about many billions of dollars of industry.

The problem is that there is basically no way rider fees alone could support that sort of capital investment. The externalities (lowering congestion on highways and in airports, improved energy effiency, lower environmental impact, etc.) are such that it might make sense for the public to subsidize it, but for whatever reason that has been a tough sell.
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