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Old 08-08-2017, 06:53 AM
 
39 posts, read 18,200 times
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I wanted to start a thread to discuss this article. I was wondering everybody's thoughts on this. I have said before I believe there are a lot of jobs in Pittsburgh but the wages are low. This also dovetails arguments about the mon valley and what to do with it or the other depressed urban and rural areas.

The Pittsburgh Conundrum
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Old 08-08-2017, 07:19 AM
 
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Honest answer? There's no reason for those towns to exist. Sometimes, people need to come out of the wilderness. Black people migrated en masse out of the South and then back. There's no saving those towns, and we shouldn't be expected to try.
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Old 08-08-2017, 07:56 AM
 
1,512 posts, read 985,178 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
Honest answer? There's no reason for those towns to exist. Sometimes, people need to come out of the wilderness. Black people migrated en masse out of the South and then back. There's no saving those towns, and we shouldn't be expected to try.
I assume you would be willing to say that to Fetterman's face.
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Old 08-08-2017, 08:23 AM
 
Location: Brookline
2,963 posts, read 2,331,981 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
Honest answer? There's no reason for those towns to exist. Sometimes, people need to come out of the wilderness. Black people migrated en masse out of the South and then back. There's no saving those towns, and we shouldn't be expected to try.


My grandparents lived in a company town, where the coal mine shut down in the late 1960s. My grandfather found other work, however they didn't move out of their house as it was paid for. After my grandfather passed away, my grandmother lived there until she transitioned to a nursing home (23 years after his death). The town was, and still is dying, around her but she had no options. What would you expect someone in that situation to do? After 60 years in that small town there was no moving back to the city for her, either socially or financially. There are factors involved outside of the financial costs of these situations. Her friends, church, and everything she knew was in that town, but hey the complete destruction of everything she knew in the twilight of her life to save a buck...why not?
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Old 08-08-2017, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Northern Appalachia
6,556 posts, read 7,410,220 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
Honest answer? There's no reason for those towns to exist. Sometimes, people need to come out of the wilderness. Black people migrated en masse out of the South and then back. There's no saving those towns, and we shouldn't be expected to try.
I don't understand the point of "There's no reason for those towns to exist." The point is they do exist. There are homes and buildings that people own unless they abandon them. People are going to continue to live in these homes and other people will likely buy them after the current residents die or move on.

Regarding places that "There's no reason for those towns to exist," have you ever been to many of the former coal company towns in Western PA? There are numerous of these coal patches with one road in and out. Duplexes are packed together on small lots. Many of these towns are isolated with long drives to grocery stores and health care. Check out former coal towns such as Isabella, Ronco, and Van Meter in Fayette County. Across the river there is Nemacolin in Greene County. In Indiana County you have Aultman, Heilwood, Vintondale, and Rossiter. In Cambria County, there is Cassandra and Dunlo.

None of these towns serve any purpose other than they already exist and people live there.

Last edited by villageidiot1; 08-08-2017 at 09:06 AM..
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Old 08-08-2017, 08:58 AM
 
Location: Brookline
2,963 posts, read 2,331,981 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by villageidiot1 View Post
I don't understand the point of "There's no reason for those towns to exist." The point is they do exist. There are homes and buildings that people own unless they abandon them. People are going to continue to live in these homes and other people will likely buy them after the current residents die or move on.

Regarding places that "There's no reason for those towns to exist," have you ever been to many of the former coal company towns in Western PA? There are numerous of these coal patches with one road in and out. Duplexes are packed together on small lots. Many of these towns are isolated with long drives to grocery stores and health care. Check out former coal towns such as Isabella , Ronco and Van Meter in Fayette County. Across the river there is Nemacolin in Greene County. In Indiana County you have Aultman , Heilwood , https://www.google.com/maps/place/Vi...!4d-78.9186377 and Rossiter. In Cambria County, there is https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ca...!4d-78.6405738 and Dunlo.

None of these towns serve any purpose other than they already exist and people live there.


And Iselin in Indiana County, which is where my grandparents managed to live entire lives in a town that didn't have a reason to exist.
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Old 08-08-2017, 09:00 AM
 
8,091 posts, read 5,399,325 times
Reputation: 9050
Quote:
Originally Posted by PghYinzer View Post
My grandparents lived in a company town, where the coal mine shut down in the late 1960s. My grandfather found other work, however they didn't move out of their house as it was paid for. After my grandfather passed away, my grandmother lived there until she transitioned to a nursing home (23 years after his death). The town was, and still is dying, around her but she had no options. What would you expect someone in that situation to do? After 60 years in that small town there was no moving back to the city for her, either socially or financially. There are factors involved outside of the financial costs of these situations. Her friends, church, and everything she knew was in that town, but hey the complete destruction of everything she knew in the twilight of her life to save a buck...why not?
Wither? Languish?
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Old 08-08-2017, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
6,304 posts, read 7,934,653 times
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"The Bureau of Labor Statistics shows wide swings in employment over the last decade, but non-farm employment in the Pittsburgh metropolitan area declined by about 15,000 between October 2016 and March 2017"

Who compares jobs in this bizarre fashion? The only appropriate way is to compare jobs within the same month but different years due to seasonal factors that arise in different months. The Pittsburgh metro had 8,000 more jobs in March 2017 over 2016.

https://www.bls.gov/eag/eag.pa_pittsburgh_msa.htm
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Old 08-08-2017, 11:08 AM
 
Location: Western Pa
435 posts, read 467,480 times
Reputation: 279
Maybe moving somewhat "outside" the particulars of this article. The "concept" of a town has changed dramatically in last 30 years & with the internet/technology , whatever small portions of a "town" still exists are going to dramatically decrease.

The days of TONS of low skill , living wage jobs , that resulted in a central town , providing all necessities are over.

With all due respect I never understood why Anyone thinks, they shouldn't have to ADAPT to the world.. I would of LOVED to of seen the time when all the Small towns of Western PA were BOOMING.

Pittsburgh is finally offering a desirable cultural and economic scenario for younger professionals. People age and get married have kid, etc. Which will help people live in more suburban / rural areas . Maybe the Stats do not back this up, however this is the FIRST time , I have ever had people actually WANT To check out this area.

I realize my post might not be directly related to the article, yet everytime I hear someone bring up "saving" towns ... My first thought comes to defining what a town is suppose to be.
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Old 08-08-2017, 12:18 PM
 
39 posts, read 18,200 times
Reputation: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradjl2009 View Post
"The Bureau of Labor Statistics shows wide swings in employment over the last decade, but non-farm employment in the Pittsburgh metropolitan area declined by about 15,000 between October 2016 and March 2017"

Who compares jobs in this bizarre fashion? The only appropriate way is to compare jobs within the same month but different years due to seasonal factors that arise in different months. The Pittsburgh metro had 8,000 more jobs in March 2017 over 2016.

https://www.bls.gov/eag/eag.pa_pittsburgh_msa.htm
It appears the region gained 15,000 jobs and that article may be inaccurate. My argument is the wages. Jobs go up and down, but wages are what retain people long term.

This gives credit to my concern low wages are an issue in Pittsburgh

https://www.bls.gov/regions/mid-atla...pittsburgh.htm
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