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Old 07-17-2019, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Brookline
2,703 posts, read 2,050,736 times
Reputation: 3231

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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhoIsStanwix? View Post
I disagree that Allegheny County (the county government? the remaining people in the county? is the county an individual with free will? not clear here) caused macro trends that are occurring all over the nation. I do think, however, that Allegheny County will struggle to grow. In particular, growth will be difficult because of the headwinds faced by the local municipalities and school districts holding the bag for legacy costs originally borne by many who have since left, effectively declaring geographical bankruptcy, leaving their debts behind for others to pay.

The costs for schools, for example, don't exactly follow those who went to those schools. Since they are generally debt financed, the future generations are paying off the debts left to them by the previous, while accounting rules changed such that certain things (like pensions) now need to be paid for by the current generation either via the change in GASB accounting rules or by the transition to defined contribution plans. This phenomenon will likely occur in other newer-developed places as the next shiny new metro (which might be in another country, how scary is that?!?!) pops up.
A lot of these school district issues could be solved or at least lessened if they would just give up on their power and their high school mascots and merge. In my home area, two schools districts were struggling and their children being impacted negatively. The local homers who were graduates of each school and parents of the suffering children fought it because the schools were sports rivals and how could they possibly merge.
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Old 07-17-2019, 11:51 AM
 
2,228 posts, read 3,298,777 times
Reputation: 1843
Quote:
Originally Posted by erieguy View Post
Whoís ďsupercomputing and living life on the roadĒ?
Haha, sounds like a song for a Silicon Valley type...meant ďsuper-commutingĒ (driving 30+ miles to work daily)
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Old 07-17-2019, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Downtown Cranberry Twp.
8,771 posts, read 5,456,073 times
Reputation: 2041
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost_In_Translation View Post
Haha, sounds like a song for a Silicon Valley type...meant “super-commuting” (driving 30+ miles to work daily)
How many people are doing that?

Who says the next generation won’t drive 30+ miles to work daily?

TIL 30+ miles to work daily is life on the road.
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Old 07-17-2019, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Weirton, W. Va.
340 posts, read 128,267 times
Reputation: 217
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost_In_Translation View Post
Agreed, which is why I believe 30 years from now, the sunbelt will be complaining about where all the people went when their shiny infrastructure starts to show age and fatigue and they have to raise taxes to pay for replacement and an unsustainable model. I donít have to do anything but wait. Just gotta time the cycles.
Quote:
Originally Posted by xdv8 View Post
Don't forget about climate change, also. Huge portions of the Sunbelt that are currently booming will probably end up abandoned.
Are you both planning on living forever? Sorry but in 30 years, if I make it that long I will be old, cold and probably in a warm climate elsewhere. Iím willing to bet people will still be moving there 30 years from now.


Quote:
Originally Posted by erieguy View Post
Believing something is going to happen versus it actually happening are 2 very different things. Being a ďcheap place to liveĒ only goes so far, and not everyone is looking for a bargain when it comes to choosing where they want to live. Desirability is a much greater factor.
Itís funny to read these posts about predicting when cities are going to collapse and when Pittsburgh will grow again.

Thirty years is a very long time. Most of us posting here will be old and some of us may not be here period. How long are you going to sit back and wait? The 2010s were supposed to be Pittsburghís decade. Now we are hoping itís the 2020s.

A good example is Columbus. A metro of 2.078 million residents. If the growth keeps on pace for the next 31 years there will be over 3 million residents in the metro. That is a long time. Trends say that will happen because it has been growing a long time.

My point is that is a fast growing city. For Pittsburgh to grow the same amount starting today it would take 30 years of that same growth year over year to return Pittsburgh to big city status. Right now it isnít looking like that will happen.

People have difficulty grasping how long growth or decline actually take. Pittsburgh has issues because of the last 40 plus years of decline. It has been ongoing and hasnít stopped.

We all donít have all of this time to wait and see what happens or wait and hope. You are better off assuming it will never happen so you can get on with your life.
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Old 07-17-2019, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Brookline
2,703 posts, read 2,050,736 times
Reputation: 3231
Quote:
Originally Posted by pittsburghaccuweather View Post
Are you both planning on living forever? Sorry but in 30 years, if I make it that long I will be old, cold and probably in a warm climate elsewhere. Iím willing to bet people will still be moving there 30 years from now.




Itís funny to read these posts about predicting when cities are going to collapse and when Pittsburgh will grow again.

Thirty years is a very long time. Most of us posting here will be old and some of us may not be here period. How long are you going to sit back and wait? The 2010s were supposed to be Pittsburghís decade. Now we are hoping itís the 2020s.

A good example is Columbus. A metro of 2.078 million residents. If the growth keeps on pace for the next 31 years there will be over 3 million residents in the metro. That is a long time. Trends say that will happen because it has been growing a long time.

My point is that is a fast growing city. For Pittsburgh to grow the same amount starting today it would take 30 years of that same growth year over year to return Pittsburgh to big city status. Right now it isnít looking like that will happen.

People have difficulty grasping how long growth or decline actually take. Pittsburgh has issues because of the last 40 plus years of decline. It has been ongoing and hasnít stopped.

We all donít have all of this time to wait and see what happens or wait and hope. You are better off assuming it will never happen so you can get on with your life.
Is this Pittsburgh decline you speak of simply population? I guess income growth, education obtainment, mobility, and increased tax revenue don't count as growth, only an archaic metric for determining growth counts.
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Old 07-17-2019, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Downtown Cranberry Twp.
8,771 posts, read 5,456,073 times
Reputation: 2041
Quote:
Originally Posted by pittsburghaccuweather View Post
Are you both planning on living forever? Sorry but in 30 years, if I make it that long I will be old, cold and probably in a warm climate elsewhere. Iím willing to bet people will still be moving there 30 years from now.




Itís funny to read these posts about predicting when cities are going to collapse and when Pittsburgh will grow again.

Thirty years is a very long time. Most of us posting here will be old and some of us may not be here period. How long are you going to sit back and wait? The 2010s were supposed to be Pittsburghís decade. Now we are hoping itís the 2020s.

A good example is Columbus. A metro of 2.078 million residents. If the growth keeps on pace for the next 31 years there will be over 3 million residents in the metro. That is a long time. Trends say that will happen because it has been growing a long time.

My point is that is a fast growing city. For Pittsburgh to grow the same amount starting today it would take 30 years of that same growth year over year to return Pittsburgh to big city status. Right now it isnít looking like that will happen.

People have difficulty grasping how long growth or decline actually take. Pittsburgh has issues because of the last 40 plus years of decline. It has been ongoing and hasnít stopped.

We all donít have all of this time to wait and see what happens or wait and hope. You are better off assuming it will never happen so you can get on with your life.
Assumptions and feelings often clouds reality.
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Old 07-17-2019, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
5,931 posts, read 7,052,959 times
Reputation: 8714
Ohio had state funding for school districts that equalizes things between school districts that are poor and rich. They also have income taxes split between the city where you live and the one where you work, if they aren't the same. Those two reforms would work wonders for Pittsburgh, city and metro.
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Old 07-17-2019, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Weirton, W. Va.
340 posts, read 128,267 times
Reputation: 217
Quote:
Originally Posted by erieguy View Post
Assumptions and feelings often clouds reality.
LOL Yep. That is good I will save that for later use.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Moby Hick View Post
Ohio had state funding for school districts that equalizes things between school districts that are poor and rich. They also have income taxes split between the city where you live and the one where you work, if they aren't the same. Those two reforms would work wonders for Pittsburgh, city and metro.
Ohio isnít doing very well outside of the Columbus metro. Is it? If it was working for the whole state Iíd agree with you.
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Old 07-17-2019, 03:43 PM
 
7,747 posts, read 4,606,872 times
Reputation: 8470
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moby Hick View Post
Ohio had state funding for school districts that equalizes things between school districts that are poor and rich. They also have income taxes split between the city where you live and the one where you work, if they aren't the same. Those two reforms would work wonders for Pittsburgh, city and metro.
Shoot this into my veins
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Old 07-17-2019, 03:48 PM
 
Location: Downtown Cranberry Twp.
8,771 posts, read 5,456,073 times
Reputation: 2041
Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
Shoot this into my veins
Even easier, just make the area more desirable so people want to live where they work. More people, more tax revenue.
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