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Old 07-12-2019, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (lovely hills but no ocean...)
1,127 posts, read 597,409 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post
. It seems like flash-flooding has worsened since I moved here.
It has. I rarely recall a flash flood alert 20-40 years ago. It seems like every rain today comes with a flash flood alert. It's crazy.
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Old 07-12-2019, 12:25 PM
 
71 posts, read 38,952 times
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I have wondered like what municipalities you think within Allegheny and surrounding metro area counties will see the highest increase for the 2020 census? Probably not the city of Pittsburgh, but some will, mostly on the more west side, with maybe a few exceptions, and places that are not built out. Just wondering which ones you may think?
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Old 07-12-2019, 12:43 PM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
30,216 posts, read 67,358,468 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sandritz6 View Post
I have wondered like what municipalities you think within Allegheny and surrounding metro area counties will see the highest increase for the 2020 census? Probably not the city of Pittsburgh, but some will, mostly on the more west side, with maybe a few exceptions, and places that are not built out. Just wondering which ones you may think?
I think South Fayette Township, Pine Township, Richland Township, and possibly North Fayette Township will be the biggest gainers. Moon Township and Robinson Township should both also show growth. Maybe Jefferson Hills, too.
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Old 07-12-2019, 05:47 PM
 
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Yeah those are pretty good guesses, I would maybe include Ohio Township and Franklin Park in there as well. Most of Allegheny County's growth recently has been in the northern/western portion more, kind of with the exception of Jefferson Hills, I guess. Though I could see Oakmont having a little increase too with that new Edgewater plan, but maybe not as high though with it probably being not as many families. What about the surrounding counties though?
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Old 07-12-2019, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Weirton, W. Va.
285 posts, read 112,195 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sandritz6 View Post
I have wondered like what municipalities you think within Allegheny and surrounding metro area counties will see the highest increase for the 2020 census? Probably not the city of Pittsburgh, but some will, mostly on the more west side, with maybe a few exceptions, and places that are not built out. Just wondering which ones you may think?
Butler County will have the most growth and it is due to the cranberry and zelinople corridor. Washington County will either show a slight growth or a slight loss a few hundred either way. Westmoreland will probably have the steepest losses with Fayette, Armstrong and Beaver worst to best.

Allegheny County is a wild card. It is going to be right on estimates in 1.210s or it will probably surprise everybody and drop below 1.2 million. The eastern suburbs and southern suburbs other than a handful are just bleeding residents. I expect huge losses in the Wikinsburgs, penn hills, monroeville, mckessports and claritons. It’s gonna be a nail biter to come in over 1.2 million. If it does remain above the city of Pittsburgh estimates are probably true and population is flatlined. If not, Pittsburgh probably dropped to the low 290s or high 280s with the outer north side, southern, west end areas and northern east end losing more residents than anticipated. I drove through Sheridan the other day when leaving the green tree office. It literally looks like nobody is home over there anymore. That is a huge city neighborhood. A big chunk of Land with a lot more vacant homes than I remember.

As far as my neck of the woods in the panhandle of WV I expect losses. However due to recent housing developments and new projects the population will probably flatline in the Region and May show some positive growth in Hancock or Ohio county (wheeling). This would be post 2020 census on the flatline or Growth. The 2020s May be the best decade in years for the Ohio valley.
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Old 07-12-2019, 07:25 PM
 
71 posts, read 38,952 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pittsburghaccuweather View Post
Butler County will have the most growth and it is due to the cranberry and zelinople corridor. Washington County will either show a slight growth or a slight loss a few hundred either way. Westmoreland will probably have the steepest losses with Fayette, Armstrong and Beaver worst to best.

Allegheny County is a wild card. It is going to be right on estimates in 1.210s or it will probably surprise everybody and drop below 1.2 million. The eastern suburbs and southern suburbs other than a handful are just bleeding residents. I expect huge losses in the Wikinsburgs, penn hills, monroeville, mckessports and claritons. It’s gonna be a nail biter to come in over 1.2 million. If it does remain above the city of Pittsburgh estimates are probably true and population is flatlined. If not, Pittsburgh probably dropped to the low 290s or high 280s with the outer north side, southern, west end areas and northern east end losing more residents than anticipated. I drove through Sheridan the other day when leaving the green tree office. It literally looks like nobody is home over there anymore. That is a huge city neighborhood. A big chunk of Land with a lot more vacant homes than I remember.

As far as my neck of the woods in the panhandle of WV I expect losses. However due to recent housing developments and new projects the population will probably flatline in the Region and May show some positive growth in Hancock or Ohio county (wheeling). This would be post 2020 census on the flatline or Growth. The 2020s May be the best decade in years for the Ohio valley.
Yeah as has been normal for years, Butler County will grow the most due to Cranberry, Adams, Jackson, etc. and maybe a little bit Buffalo (southeast corner off 28) continuing to grow. Washington will be relatively flat, Canonsburg area seems to be growing similarly to southern Butler County, but probably will be more offset by losses elsewhere, particularly in the Mon Valley area. I would say the same for Allegheny, but maybe a little steeper than Washington due to the net gains that Butler and Washington are having with people moving from Allegheny. However, I would say Fayette and Armstrong will have the worst declines, I don't know of anywhere in either one growing with housing developments much. Westmoreland does seem to be slowing down a bit due to some of its previously growing areas seem to not be building as many new housing developments as before. I could see North Huntingdon Township having a little growth but that's probably about it. Beaver seems to be doing slightly better than before, maybe partly to do with the Shell plant and developments spilling over from Cranberry and Airport areas, so maybe it will be the best of those 4, although it will still definitely decline overall.
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Old 07-13-2019, 12:32 AM
 
Location: Crafton via San Francisco
3,405 posts, read 3,878,862 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pittsburghaccuweather View Post
I am happy you came here to start a business. We need more people like you to come to the area. Since this thread is about if Pittsburgh will ever increase in population, I merely was pointing out the backwards policy and funding wants instead of needs and how it has had a negative effect on pretty much everything including business thus hindering population growth.

So let me pose a hypothetical question to you. What would the public reaction be if the water system in San Francisco was inadequate with lead lines and drainage was poor causing mass flooding every rainfall? All the while politicians were like hey we have 2 billion dollars to upgrade an adequate airport, but silence and no attention to the water system or drainage to prevent flooding? I find it hard to believe the local public would take it there. In fact I bet it would be national news.
The big issues in SF are cost of housing, homelessness, and crime. Those issues make the national news. Similar hue and cry and arguing over how to address those issues as you see here over the issues you mentioned. Parts of the city look more like a third world country than an American city due to homelessness. That dog poop you stepped in probably isn't dog poop. Public restrooms are another huge issue. Most cities seem to have problems that appear to be insurmountable and citizens who think their elected officials are idiots.
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Old 07-13-2019, 04:57 AM
 
Location: Weirton, W. Va.
285 posts, read 112,195 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sandritz6 View Post
Yeah as has been normal for years, Butler County will grow the most due to Cranberry, Adams, Jackson, etc. and maybe a little bit Buffalo (southeast corner off 28) continuing to grow. Washington will be relatively flat, Canonsburg area seems to be growing similarly to southern Butler County, but probably will be more offset by losses elsewhere, particularly in the Mon Valley area. I would say the same for Allegheny, but maybe a little steeper than Washington due to the net gains that Butler and Washington are having with people moving from Allegheny. However, I would say Fayette and Armstrong will have the worst declines, I don't know of anywhere in either one growing with housing developments much. Westmoreland does seem to be slowing down a bit due to some of its previously growing areas seem to not be building as many new housing developments as before. I could see North Huntingdon Township having a little growth but that's probably about it. Beaver seems to be doing slightly better than before, maybe partly to do with the Shell plant and developments spilling over from Cranberry and Airport areas, so maybe it will be the best of those 4, although it will still definitely decline overall.
I think the declines in Westmoreland will be surprising. I think they will lose anywhere from 12-25k residents. I know what estimates say, but it is so hard to call it correctly. The census bureau usually under estimates gains or losses. Pittsburgh in 2009 was estimated to have 312,000 for 2010. That was off by 7,000. If it is off that much today you are looking at a Pittsburgh population around 293,000. I remember the Cleveland estimates being way off. They projected the city to be in the 410s. It came in around the 380s.

Pittsburgh is going to be interesting. How bad are the losses in the south side/ south hills neighborhoods, west end neighborhoods, upper north side neighborhoods and homewoods and Lincoln lemmingtons. Is the east liberty, Lawrenceville, strip district, lower north side, Troy hill, Oakland, South side flats growth enough to offset those losses. And how big are those losses? Can the shadysides, Brookline’s, squirrel hills and green fields remain steady without losing.

I think the city losing under 15,000 would be a huge victory. It lost 28,000 between 2000-2010 and 35,000 between 1990 and 2000. If the city reduced the losses by 7,000 you are looking at a city in the low 280s.

The X factor is how bad the decline really is outside of the east end growth area and central north side.
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Old 07-13-2019, 05:54 AM
 
71 posts, read 38,952 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pittsburghaccuweather View Post
I think the declines in Westmoreland will be surprising. I think they will lose anywhere from 12-25k residents. I know what estimates say, but it is so hard to call it correctly. The census bureau usually under estimates gains or losses. Pittsburgh in 2009 was estimated to have 312,000 for 2010. That was off by 7,000. If it is off that much today you are looking at a Pittsburgh population around 293,000. I remember the Cleveland estimates being way off. They projected the city to be in the 410s. It came in around the 380s.

Pittsburgh is going to be interesting. How bad are the losses in the south side/ south hills neighborhoods, west end neighborhoods, upper north side neighborhoods and homewoods and Lincoln lemmingtons. Is the east liberty, Lawrenceville, strip district, lower north side, Troy hill, Oakland, South side flats growth enough to offset those losses. And how big are those losses? Can the shadysides, Brookline’s, squirrel hills and green fields remain steady without losing.

I think the city losing under 15,000 would be a huge victory. It lost 28,000 between 2000-2010 and 35,000 between 1990 and 2000. If the city reduced the losses by 7,000 you are looking at a city in the low 280s.

The X factor is how bad the decline really is outside of the east end growth area and central north side.
My rough estimates go as follow:

2010 2020 Change # Change %

Butler County 183,862 189,116 +5,064 +2.8%
Washington Co. 207,820 208,066 + 246 +0.1%
Armstrong Co. 68,941 64,838 -4,103 -6.3%
Beaver Co. 170,539 163,882 -6,657 -4.1%
Fayette Co. 136,606 129,392 -7,214 -5.6%
Allegheny Co. 1,223,348 1,214,741 -8,607 -0.7%
Westmoreland Co. 365,169 348,620 -16,549 -4.8%
Pittsburgh City 305,704 292,361 -13,343 -4.6%
Metro Area 2,356,285 2,318,655 -37,630 -1.6%
Pennsylvania 12,702,379 12,828,731 +126,352 +1.0%

As you have said, Butler will definitely increase the most, Washington will have a slight uptick, Allegheny and Beaver are still losing but not as much as before, Armstrong and Fayette are continuing steep declines and Westmoreland is losing a little more than before. Pittsburgh city is doing a little better than before too but it still will be hard to offset the losses in some of the bad sections, and as you can see most of Pennsylvania's growth will be from the central to east side, with pockets around Pittsburgh.
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Old 07-13-2019, 07:56 AM
Status: "You picked the wrong fool, fool." (set 11 days ago)
 
533 posts, read 140,007 times
Reputation: 378
If it weren't for so many old people dying, Pittsburgh would already be gaining population. Either way, I assume at the 2030 census, Pittsburgh will have about 330,000 people.
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