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Old Yesterday, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Lawrenceville, Pittsburgh
1,887 posts, read 1,546,039 times
Reputation: 1646

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Quote:
Originally Posted by pittsburghaccuweather View Post
176 miles from downtown Pittsburgh to downtown Columbus. Two metros essentially headed in opposite directions in regards to population growth. The metro adds 30-50 thousand residents a year. Roughly half in the urban county of Franklin. The rest are spilt between the suburban counties surrounding Franklin.

So what is the the magic potion? Just down the road from Pittsburgh and Cleveland. What do they have that Pittsburgh doesn’t? Their rural areas and towns are growing there while ours aren’t.
Available land for development that is flat, that doesn't require tearing anything existing down? The lack of legacy costs that go along with it? Same reasons sunbelt and other greenfield development continues to occur, while existing areas are slowly abandoned. People do not want to pay for the costs of their past, they'd rather move away and leave others holding the bag. It's the same reason Butler County in our area grows faster than Allegheny.
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Old Yesterday, 02:36 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,649,686 times
Reputation: 33083
Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
Thatís where most immigrants enter the country. Weíre also seeing a third Great Migration thatís seeing poor Black people move south for lower COL and/or employment opportunities.
Perhaps, but people have been moving to the sunbelt for decades now. It doesn't help Pittsburgh to just ignore that and say "Not everyone wants to go to the sunbelt". They need to do something to make it desirable. I'll point out that some fast-growing cities don't have warm winters, e.g. Seattle, Portland, Denver.
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Old Yesterday, 02:41 PM
 
72 posts, read 39,489 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhoIsStanwix? View Post
Available land for development that is flat, that doesn't require tearing anything existing down? The lack of legacy costs that go along with it? Same reasons sunbelt and other greenfield development continues to occur, while existing areas are slowly abandoned. People do not want to pay for the costs of their past, they'd rather move away and leave others holding the bag. It's the same reason Butler County in our area grows faster than Allegheny.
Yeah I would say having undeveloped land to build off of has helped Butler County's growth a lot, and I think Columbus is on a larger scale similar to the growth seen in Morgantown and State College areas as well.
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Old Yesterday, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Cleveland
557 posts, read 316,307 times
Reputation: 838
Another thing that some of these higher growth metros have is the age advantage. Columbus' median age is 31.8 whereas Pittsburgh's is 42.7. Its a big difference, the lower age is indicative of younger people who will procreate and boost the numbers by organic growth, not just in migration or annexation.

Us older rustbelt types have to get out there and make them babies.

Another big advantage that the high growth metros have is momentum in providing infrastructure. If the metro has demonstrated growth, then the infrastructure machine starts to turn more easily. Roads, apartments, housing, water, sewer, etc. are getting built more regularly, even continuously. The DFW metroplex grows by abour 125k every year, think about the infrastructure that needs to be continuously expanded year after year - just to support that.

I know a lot of this has already been stated, but that's my 2cents.

I must say though, I'm glad that's not happening in my area. Modest growth would be nice, but nothing like Dallas or even Columbus.
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Old Yesterday, 07:16 PM
 
Location: Weirton, W. Va.
292 posts, read 115,277 times
Reputation: 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by 216facts View Post
Another thing that some of these higher growth metros have is the age advantage. Columbus' median age is 31.8 whereas Pittsburgh's is 42.7. Its a big difference, the lower age is indicative of younger people who will procreate and boost the numbers by organic growth, not just in migration or annexation.

Us older rustbelt types have to get out there and make them babies.

Another big advantage that the high growth metros have is momentum in providing infrastructure. If the metro has demonstrated growth, then the infrastructure machine starts to turn more easily. Roads, apartments, housing, water, sewer, etc. are getting built more regularly, even continuously. The DFW metroplex grows by abour 125k every year, think about the infrastructure that needs to be continuously expanded year after year - just to support that.

I know a lot of this has already been stated, but that's my 2cents.

I must say though, I'm glad that's not happening in my area. Modest growth would be nice, but nothing like Dallas or even Columbus.
I thought the city of Pittsburgh was 33 years old median age? Or do u mean overall metro ages? If thatís the case there is a huge difference there. Itís interesting to me that the small towns are increasing there. I read an article that Newark Ohio just passed 50,000 residents. It is a good 30 plus mile drive out from Columbus one way. The economy has to be strong there. Then you have zanesville 30 miles beyond that and in decline.

It would be like Allegheny county growing and then far out suburb towns like butler, Washington and greensburg growing as well. Even growth reaching out as far as Weirton. I dunno man I think growth is always better than stagnation or decline. Iíd love to see that growth here. The Pittsburgh area has the space and the towns they just need the people moving here
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Old Yesterday, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Downtown Cranberry Twp.
8,749 posts, read 5,434,715 times
Reputation: 2024
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Perhaps, but people have been moving to the sunbelt for decades now. It doesn't help Pittsburgh to just ignore that and say "Not everyone wants to go to the sunbelt". They need to do something to make it desirable. I'll point out that some fast-growing cities don't have warm winters, e.g. Seattle, Portland, Denver.
It’s hard for some to understand that what they feel is desirable isn’t desirable to everyone else.

Any area that is truly desirable will attract people to that area.
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Old Yesterday, 10:39 PM
 
359 posts, read 539,750 times
Reputation: 391
Scroll down until you reach your metro/city of interest:
https://www.census-charts.com/Metropolitan/AgeSex.html
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Old Today, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,439 posts, read 11,941,006 times
Reputation: 10542
Quote:
Originally Posted by acenturi View Post
Scroll down until you reach your metro/city of interest:
https://www.census-charts.com/Metropolitan/AgeSex.html
Just to be clear though, those numbers are from the 2000 census. By 2017 the median age of the metro had risen to 35.9.
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Old Today, 07:06 AM
 
Location: East End, Pittsburgh
877 posts, read 448,790 times
Reputation: 952
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhoIsStanwix? View Post
Available land for development that is flat, that doesn't require tearing anything existing down? The lack of legacy costs that go along with it? Same reasons sunbelt and other greenfield development continues to occur, while existing areas are slowly abandoned. People do not want to pay for the costs of their past, they'd rather move away and leave others holding the bag. It's the same reason Butler County in our area grows faster than Allegheny.
Yes.
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Old Today, 07:24 AM
 
Location: Downtown Cranberry Twp.
8,749 posts, read 5,434,715 times
Reputation: 2024
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhoIsStanwix? View Post
Available land for development that is flat, that doesn't require tearing anything existing down? The lack of legacy costs that go along with it? Same reasons sunbelt and other greenfield development continues to occur, while existing areas are slowly abandoned. People do not want to pay for the costs of their past, they'd rather move away and leave others holding the bag. It's the same reason Butler County in our area grows faster than Allegheny.
Poor planning shouldnít require anyone to pay for things that they had nothing to do with. If one wants to stay and hold the bag for those things thatís on them.

Donít tell anyone but many in Butler County would pay more taxes. We just donít have to.
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