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Old 04-23-2009, 08:53 AM
 
41,711 posts, read 46,215,761 times
Reputation: 27286
I think Pittsburgheze is becoming isolated to specific neighborhoods. When I saw this thread last night, I asked my son when he last heard anyone say "yinz." He couldn't remember hearing anyone saying it in years. We live in the suburbs so perhaps that's the reason, but I work downtown and I never hear anyone saying it there either.
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Old 04-23-2009, 10:01 AM
 
Location: Great White North Hills
8,194 posts, read 7,189,955 times
Reputation: 4408
Quote:
Originally Posted by slamont61 View Post
.

Yins need to redd-up the dialect there.

Actually, that's one local expression I like. And it stumps my spell check.


Chiefly Pennsylvania To clear: redd the dinner table. [SIZE=-1]PHRASAL VERB:[/SIZE]redd up To tidy: redded up the front room. [SIZE=-1]ETYMOLOGY:[/SIZE]Middle English dialectal redden, to clear an area (influenced by Middle English redden, to rescue, free from), from Old Norse rydhja. See rid. [SIZE=-1]REGIONAL NOTE:[/SIZE]The terms redd and redd up came to the American Midlands from the many Scottish immigrants who settled there. Meaning “to clear an area or to make it tidy,” redd is still used in Scotland and Northern Ireland; in the United States it is especially common in Pennsylvania as the phrasal verb redd up. The term, which goes back to Old Norse rydhja, can be traced from the 15th century to the present, particularly in dialects of Scotland and the North of England.
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Old 04-23-2009, 11:33 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
12,819 posts, read 9,991,246 times
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Quote:
when he last heard anyone say "yinz."
People still say it. I've got a coworker at CMU who does, and it greatly pleased my (out-of-town) dad when our waitress at Satalio's on Mt. Washington asked if she "could get yinz anything else?"
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Old 04-23-2009, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
2,082 posts, read 2,518,369 times
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I hardly ever hear the dialect anymore. I think most people use it when they're jaggin'.
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Old 04-23-2009, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh's 'EAST SIDE'
2,043 posts, read 3,134,591 times
Reputation: 2600
I hear a BUNCH of people say YINZ. Especially neighborhood bartenders and waitresses. "What can I get yinz today"....or "yinz need anything else"....?

I hear DAHN-TAHN, STILLERS, and N' AT' a lot too. That's about it.


I have a co-worker who travels with her husband a lot since her husband works in H.R. She said when they're traveling, people always ask her "You're from Pittsburgh, aren't you"?

LOL @ "jaggin"...now THAT'S one word "I" always say..... lmao
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Old 04-23-2009, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Dormont
285 posts, read 519,741 times
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I hear more Pittsburgheese in my hometown an hour and a half away from Pittsburgh than I do in Pittsburgh. Then again, I live in Shadyside and the majority of my friends in Pittsburgh are other students who are not from the Pittsburgh area.
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Old 04-23-2009, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Great White North Hills
8,194 posts, read 7,189,955 times
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My wife and I were on a dive trip in Aruba when the dive master came over and said, Yinz guys ready to go?

He'd been living there about 5 years but still kept his accent. He was a big Stillers fan an'at.
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Old 04-24-2009, 07:59 AM
 
Location: New Kensington (Parnassus) ,Pa
2,424 posts, read 810,471 times
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For a southerner it means yall.
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Old 04-24-2009, 08:08 AM
 
Location: New Kensington (Parnassus) ,Pa
2,424 posts, read 810,471 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luv4ThePaws View Post
Where did "yinz" even come from?! I don't get it!!! It sounds so weird when I try to use it in a sentence!!
If you go to the regional history center and look hard, you will find histoical reference to this word to about 200 yrs ago. PITTSBURGHESE .com
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Old 04-24-2009, 07:01 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC
151 posts, read 250,276 times
Reputation: 104
Thanks! Yinz have been very helpful!
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