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Old 05-05-2009, 06:31 PM
 
298 posts, read 125,943 times
Reputation: 111

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Quote:
Originally Posted by COPANUT View Post
My guess is the term yuppie was given a negative connotation by someone working for minimum wage. Personally, I wish about 40 thousand yuppies would move into the Pgh area to jump start the economy.
Since you live in the "North Suburbs" why don't you lead the way and let me know how East Liberty is? That's the kind of neighborhood yuppies love, so you'll be around a lot of like-minded folks. Don't let us backwards hicks stand in your way of bringing Pittsburgh out of the dark ages!
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Old 05-05-2009, 07:24 PM
 
Location: Great White North Hills
8,501 posts, read 7,750,736 times
Reputation: 4709
Sliberty ain't doing all that good. But, tearing down that apt building and getting rid of the circle is a step in the right direction.

This region is never going back to steel and manufacturing, well maybe when the Pirates win the World Series. We need an injection of capital to this region, and if it's yuppie money, who cares?
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Old 05-06-2009, 03:26 AM
 
20,274 posts, read 18,901,765 times
Reputation: 2827
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattjd View Post
You don't really believe that do you? I mean, you do know that the term Yuppie has a negative connotation, right? It doesn't simply mean any young, educated person. There is a culture that goes with that. I mean, you DO know this, right? You don't really think that any person under 35 with a BA is a yuppie, do you????
I know the term "yuppie" acquired a negative connotation in the late-1980s/early-1990s. Part of that was the feeling yuppies tended to support Reagan-Bush, and more specifically Reaganomics, for purely selfish reasons. People also seemed to object to the conspicuous consumption associated with yuppies, although in retrospect I have come to think that critique was a bit unfair: if you are young, single, and have a lot of disposable income, I now don't think there is a huge problem with having some fun buying stuff with some of that money.

In any event, as noted I know the negative sense of the term "yuppie" from that period. What I don't have a clear idea about is how you are using the term today.
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Old 05-06-2009, 05:07 AM
 
298 posts, read 125,943 times
Reputation: 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianTH View Post
I know the term "yuppie" acquired a negative connotation in the late-1980s/early-1990s. Part of that was the feeling yuppies tended to support Reagan-Bush, and more specifically Reaganomics, for purely selfish reasons. People also seemed to object to the conspicuous consumption associated with yuppies, although in retrospect I have come to think that critique was a bit unfair: if you are young, single, and have a lot of disposable income, I now don't think there is a huge problem with having some fun buying stuff with some of that money.

In any event, as noted I know the negative sense of the term "yuppie" from that period. What I don't have a clear idea about is how you are using the term today.
Ok, fine, you don't get it. That was obvious a dozen posts ago. I think it's pretty lame to drag out a topic to 30+ posts discussing the definition of what a yuppie is, as if it is even that difficult. I have no problems discussing/debating the issue, but when I find myself having to repost my points several times, and even after that people can't get them right, then it is clear that people aren't reading all the posts and the whole thread has become meaningless.
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Old 05-16-2009, 03:20 PM
 
Location: City of McKeesport
3,934 posts, read 4,071,195 times
Reputation: 2422
Why lump all young professionals into one category? You can't describe everyone in an age group the same way. I am a young professional who moved to Pittsburgh because I admired the historic architecture, affordable housing, and beautiful scenery and skyline. I moved here when I was 22, and not to be close to "Whole Foods" or because it was "hip." I could have moved anywhere I wanted -- I just happened to like Pittsburgh the best. And I knew it was a place I could see myself setting down roots and living the rest of my life.

I think there are a lot of people in this town who make broad generalizations about young people who live in the city. I think that is unfair. I have a job, I contribute to the economy, I appreciate Pittsburgh and the people who lived here before me. I'm not some egocentric jerk just because I wasn't born here. I just happen to like urban places and when I see large areas of the cities in ruins it makes me want to move in and start fixing it up. In the two years I have lived here, I have seen Lawrenceville become one of the most exciting neighborhoods in the city. Butler Street is becoming almost as "hip" as E. Carson, IMO. North side has gone from ghetto to the land of urban pioneers -- I have a couple friends restoring and living in Victorians in Manchester. Downtown has gone from dead after 6, to brimming with life and activity well into the evening.

Now I am buying an old Victorian in Spring Hill and getting ready to completely restore it. I think you should consider just how much young people may contribute to a city before you judge someone. Everyone is different.
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Old 05-16-2009, 03:27 PM
 
Location: Great White North Hills
8,501 posts, read 7,750,736 times
Reputation: 4709
Quote:
Originally Posted by alleghenyangel View Post
I think you should consider just how much young people may contribute to a city before you judge someone. Everyone is different.

Like I said, we need about 40K of you.
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Old 05-17-2009, 12:11 PM
 
Location: RVA
2,415 posts, read 2,999,113 times
Reputation: 1140
"Yuppies" absolutely ruined San Francisco.
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Old 05-17-2009, 01:51 PM
 
Location: SS Slopes
251 posts, read 197,833 times
Reputation: 117
How about everyone arguing the definition of a yuppie start a new thread called "Semantics." IMO the answer to this one is fully summed up by COPANUT's:

Quote:
We need an injection of capital to this region, and if it's yuppie money, who cares?
We're in the age of technology. You can either foster that and welcome the changing culture or pine for the old culture of heavy industry and the community it created.

And I will never support the notion that gentrification of a neighborhood is bad because it drives out the poor. I have emapthy for the honest working poor, sure, but that's no reason to say a ghetto should remain a ghetto. Because also driven out are the crack dealers and gang members and welfare queens, to be replaced by those who, oh I don't know, might actually contribute to the local economy. And the people that actually own their homes get to see their worth go up and benefit from more and better public services.

...but what do I know, that's just my stupid arrogant yuppie opinion.
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Old 05-17-2009, 02:53 PM
Status: "60th anniversary of the polio vaccine! Hail to Pitt!" (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
70,066 posts, read 60,674,394 times
Reputation: 20204
I read the original link, and got into the discussion of the definition of "yuppie". Like Brian (!), in retrospect, I think we were too hard on the yuppies of the 80s-90s. They did a lot of good with revitalizing some old neighborhoods, both in Pittsburgh and here in Denver.
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Old 05-17-2009, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
3,945 posts, read 3,580,705 times
Reputation: 1902
Quote:
Originally Posted by alleghenyangel View Post
Why lump all young professionals into one category? You can't describe everyone in an age group the same way. I am a young professional who moved to Pittsburgh because I admired the historic architecture, affordable housing, and beautiful scenery and skyline. I moved here when I was 22, and not to be close to "Whole Foods" or because it was "hip." I could have moved anywhere I wanted -- I just happened to like Pittsburgh the best. And I knew it was a place I could see myself setting down roots and living the rest of my life.

I think there are a lot of people in this town who make broad generalizations about young people who live in the city. I think that is unfair. I have a job, I contribute to the economy, I appreciate Pittsburgh and the people who lived here before me. I'm not some egocentric jerk just because I wasn't born here. I just happen to like urban places and when I see large areas of the cities in ruins it makes me want to move in and start fixing it up. In the two years I have lived here, I have seen Lawrenceville become one of the most exciting neighborhoods in the city. Butler Street is becoming almost as "hip" as E. Carson, IMO. North side has gone from ghetto to the land of urban pioneers -- I have a couple friends restoring and living in Victorians in Manchester. Downtown has gone from dead after 6, to brimming with life and activity well into the evening.

Now I am buying an old Victorian in Spring Hill and getting ready to completely restore it. I think you should consider just how much young people may contribute to a city before you judge someone. Everyone is different.
You're the type people our city should look for! Spring Hill is a nice quiet neighoborhood btw.
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