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Old 08-02-2010, 10:55 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
1,758 posts, read 2,407,624 times
Reputation: 521

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Quote:
Originally Posted by aveojohn View Post
Until the attitude and class of people in this area change, I don't feel much will happen. This is a crime ridden area and the Grocery store that is opening will close within 5 yrs.I say bulldoze the whole area and start over.
I read that there are only seven hundred residents of this area known as Uptown. As was mentioned, this may be a part of the Hill District, but is not the heart of the Hill where thousands live. There are a lot of vacant lots and other vacant buildings ripe for development. The businesses that are currenty there know what they have. I am sure that many bar owners would either like to sell or cater to a more different clientele that is surely to frequent the area if not eventually move in. East General Robinson Street on the North Shore was full of shanties a dozen years ago. They were torn down and the junkies and the drug dealers disappeared. Uptown is a bit bigger and more complex, but not so big as to be insurmountable. Plus, it already has key anchors in Consol Energy Center, Mercy, and Duquesne fueling this revitalization of a decent sized neighborhoods that is sparsely populated, relatively speaking. I would be very surprised and disappointed if Uptown is not one of Pittsburgh's premier neighborhoods by 2020. It has too much going for it.
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Old 08-03-2010, 06:19 AM
 
20,274 posts, read 18,616,125 times
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I think it all depends on population dynamics--if there continues to be high demand for residential units in or near Downtown and Oakland, then I think it really is just a matter of time for Uptown, and maybe not that much time for it to at least be recognized as an up-and-coming neighborhood.
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Old 08-03-2010, 03:07 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
1,758 posts, read 2,407,624 times
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From my experience, people that are bent on doing the wrong thing tend to shy away from the shiny and new the way vampires shy away from sunlight. Once this area begins to look and feel as it is revitalized, ill intentioned individuals will not be able to lurk in the shadows as they will stick out like a sore thumb. They may possibly benefit from the neighborhood's turnaround if they choose to gain employment in one of the hundreds of new jobs that the neighborhood will create. If they choose not to do so, they will move elsewhere and drag down some other neighborhood.

note: I did not mean to say "more different" in my previous post. I was thinking one thing and typed another. I forgot to proof read.
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Old 08-04-2010, 07:15 AM
 
296 posts, read 316,700 times
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They had better get the development going this time. There have been too many structures torn down in Uptown to make way for 7 car surface parking lots. Uptown has a lot of potential - but it has had a lot of potential for decades since it has always been between Oakland and Downtown.
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Old 08-04-2010, 10:22 AM
 
Location: South Oakland, Pittsburgh, PA
875 posts, read 816,631 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grimacista View Post
They had better get the development going this time. There have been too many structures torn down in Uptown to make way for 7 car surface parking lots. Uptown has a lot of potential - but it has had a lot of potential for decades since it has always been between Oakland and Downtown.
Yeah I agree with this, however I think there are still some visual boundaries that isolated it from both areas. The crosstown expressway overpass on the Downtown side and the crazy Birmingham Bridge interchange on the Oakland side each serve to deter pedestrian access along the Forbes and Fifth corridor. Not much can be done about the highway overpass, but after extensively observing the area around the Birmingham Bridge I think there is a lot of improvement that can be made in terms of bike and pedestrian infrastructure. The bike lanes on the bridge are a nice touch and are well done, but they terminate on either end without a clear sense (for cyclists) about where to go from there. The sidewalk on the bridge terminates at this crazy intersection with Forbes and near the former Brady St, but there's no sidewalk or staircase up to Fifth Ave.

The amount of disconnected bike/ped infrastructure in these areas is still stifling, and I still have the opinion that if the city were to start with that it could effectively extend the reach/influence of the Downtown and Oakland areas. Otherwise, we will still continue to see these lame aforementioned small parking lots where houses once stood.
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Old 08-04-2010, 11:29 AM
 
20,274 posts, read 18,616,125 times
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Of course for most of the last few decades, the population and economic dynamics in the City weren't conducive to redeveloping areas like Uptown. That's changing, but there is still a big backlog of possible areas to redevelop. I think Uptown will end up high on the list, but you never know.
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Old 08-04-2010, 02:31 PM
 
4,043 posts, read 3,175,776 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianTH View Post
Of course for most of the last few decades, the population and economic dynamics in the City weren't conducive to redeveloping areas like Uptown. That's changing, but there is still a big backlog of possible areas to redevelop. I think Uptown will end up high on the list, but you never know.
It really is amazing how many areas there are in this region that are just begging for revitalization of one sort or another. I think the region is unique in how many of these areas are not dangerous ghettos, many of them just feel generally abandoned and empty when you walk around them. Braddock and Uptown both feel this way to me.

Speaking of Braddock, that brings me to my next point: there is a huge backlog of places begging for redevelopment, but I think that Uptown is higher on the list than many of them, mostly due to location.

Last edited by ferraris; 08-04-2010 at 03:11 PM..
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Old 08-04-2010, 02:53 PM
 
20,274 posts, read 18,616,125 times
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Yeah, I'd say the chief "competitors" for Uptown when it comes to redevelopment are the Hill, the Strip, and the North Side, all of which also enjoy good proximity to Downtown. You can make a case for Uptown being better-located than all these others thanks to Oakland, but Oakland-oriented redevelopment could also go to other parts of the East End, as in fact is already happening.

In the end I'm still pretty bullish on Uptown, but not quite confident enough to guarantee anything in the very near future.
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Old 08-04-2010, 08:31 PM
 
Location: City of McKeesport
3,933 posts, read 3,984,920 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ferrarisnowday View Post
It really is amazing how many areas there are in this region that are just begging for revitalization of one sort or another. I think the region is unique in how many of these areas are not dangerous ghettos, many of them just feel generally abandoned and empty when you walk around them. Braddock and Uptown both feel this way to me.
I agree completely, and that is what makes Pittsburgh such a great place for the urban pioneer. Unlike cities such as Detroit or Baltimore, Pittsburgh just isn't scary or dangerous outside of a few select neighborhoods (Homewood, Hill District come to mind). Even the supposed "bad" areas like Manchester really don't scare me too much.
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