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Old 11-05-2009, 11:56 PM
 
Location: Under Mount Doom
9,138 posts, read 5,972,454 times
Reputation: 4672

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I have become very interested in the burgh. Hey, the zombies, crumbling bridges, Gotham City skyline, and deep-fried twinky restaurants I keep hearing about, just seem so cool! And so are the folks on this board. I have heard much more about muscle cars,beer, Whiskey festivals, and anthem rock here than veganism, chakra-balancing, and feng shui....

Now, coming from a semi-rural area in the Far West, it would certainly be a change for our family. Anyone out there a Westerner who has homesteaded the Steel City or environs? I really don't care if you loved it or hated it, just your honest take. What was a challenge? What was a pleasant surprise (ok, besides deep-fried twinkies)? Locals to did a stint out West are welcome too.

It is interesting, but would guess that over the last year, I have read posts from ten times as many people dreaming of heading from the East, Midwest to the West as are heading the other way. Yet, the value for families is undoubtedly so much higher there. Have any of you swam upstream?

Last edited by Fiddlehead; 11-06-2009 at 12:41 AM..
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Old 11-05-2009, 11:59 PM
 
Location: Macao
12,930 posts, read 19,519,317 times
Reputation: 6512
Wait a minute, DEEP FRIED TWINKIES?

Pittsburgh has those? I always thought that was a southern thing. A friend of mine, form the 'da Carolinas' was telling me about them!

I've never personally had one, or even imagined them...even now I can't imagine how one would would taste...or even why you'd want to fry it! But nonthless, that is an interesting topic in itself!
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Old 11-06-2009, 12:12 AM
 
Location: Under Mount Doom
9,138 posts, read 5,972,454 times
Reputation: 4672
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Wait a minute, DEEP FRIED TWINKIES?

Pittsburgh has those? I always thought that was a southern thing. A friend of mine, form the 'da Carolinas' was telling me about them!

I've never personally had one, or even imagined them...even now I can't imagine how one would would taste...or even why you'd want to fry it! But nonthless, that is an interesting topic in itself!

Actually, you will be able to get them at this fine establishment.

Toby Keith restaurant coming to Pittsburgh's SouthSide Works - Pittsburgh Business Times:

And discounts coupons for angioplasty at UPMC with each meal!

Hey, I love Chicken Fried Steak and marshmallow jello salad, so I am halfway there...
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Old 11-06-2009, 06:37 AM
 
367 posts, read 560,461 times
Reputation: 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fiddlehead View Post
I have become very interested in the burgh. Hey, the zombies, crumbling bridges, Gotham City skyline, and deep-fried twinky restaurants I keep hearing about, just seem so cool! And so are the folks on this board. I have heard much more about muscle cars,beer, Whiskey festivals, and anthem rock here than veganism, chakra-balancing, and feng shui....

Now, coming from a semi-rural area in the Far West, it would certainly be a change for our family. Anyone out there a Westerner who has homesteaded the Steel City or environs? I really don't care if you loved it or hated it, just your honest take. What was a challenge? What was a pleasant surprise (ok, besides deep-fried twinkies)? Locals to did a stint out West are welcome too.

It is interesting, but would guess that over the last year, I have read posts from ten times as many people dreaming of heading from the East, Midwest to the West as are heading the other way. Yet, the value for families is undoubtedly so much higher there. Have any of you swam upstream?
WE just put in a 20 yr. USAF career. My wife and I are originally from Lawrenceville.(inner-city Pittsburgh) We lived in Cheyenne, WY for 3 yrs, Tucson, AZ for 2 yrs and Vacaville, CA for 5yrs. When it was time to retire from the USAF we decided to go back to Cheyenne. One year later we realized that we made the wrong choice and really needed to go back to PA. We had a strong desire to be back among family & true life-long friends and a town/area that is very unique and welcoming.

Growing up in Lawrenceville was tough but good. It keeps us both grounded to this day. The people in the city, for the most part, are good down-to-earth folks. Growing up poor keeps a person HUMBLE and humility is something no one can get enough of.

There is NO perfect place to live. There is give & take no matter where you hang your hat. Being back in PA is a breath of fresh air. The fall was terrific this year. The rivers & lakes and easy access to them is a blessing and the wonderfully diverse woods/forest are a real gem.

Pittsburgh has REAL character. It was founded by people with character who were honest and hard working. The history here is RICH, to say the least. For the most part, Pittsburgh is still not "fancy-schmancy" and that is a good thing. People are not full of themselves here and THAT is refreshing as well.

People moan & groan about this & that regarding The Burgh. Then again people are going to moan & groan about ANY place. You can not please everyone and folks will ALWAYS find something to complain about. There is NO Utopia, period. The bottom line for us is this........Pittsburgh & PA have more positives than negatives going for it and that is why we are happy to once again call it HOME.
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Old 11-06-2009, 09:09 AM
 
Location: RVA
2,413 posts, read 2,965,806 times
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I lived out West for almost a decade, and the biggest difference is the lack of pretension here. The horrible smugness of the Bay Area and Seattle were my biggest complaints, by far (followed by the astronomical cost of living, of course, and the never-ending sea of "humanity" in San Francisco coming in third). Sure, you give up some things (Asian restaurants on every corner, for instance), but I haven't missed much so far. It's been a little over two years, so that could change, but I don't see it happening. Also, despite how much people whine about the weather here, I think it's great and the presence of four distinct seasons is great, too. Bring on the winter!
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Old 11-06-2009, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Under Mount Doom
9,138 posts, read 5,972,454 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heit View Post
....Growing up poor keeps a person HUMBLE and humility is something no one can get enough of. ....

...The rivers & lakes and easy access to them is a blessing and the wonderfully diverse woods/forest are a real gem....

...Pittsburgh has REAL character. It was founded by people with character who were honest and hard working. The history here is RICH, to say the least. For the most part, Pittsburgh is still not "fancy-schmancy" and that is a good thing. People are not full of themselves here and THAT is refreshing as well. ...
Thanks Heit,

Great to get your perspective after traveling. I like all the things you mentioned as well.

One interesting side topic is that most parents want to raise their kids in upper middle class or higher environs, if they can afford it. Yet, I agree that humility, a work ethic (no one owes you a dime, and you have to bust your butt to succeed ANYWHERE), and a down-to-earth perspective when dealing with others are all very positive in my mind. Yet, folks are always pushing to get their kids in the most affluent neighborhoods or private school. I think many of those kids end up with a feeling of entitlement and a weak grasp of how to work for their goals and respect others, even the poor.

I know what you mean about Cheyenne. It is certainly a beautiful area, but Wyoming is not for all. I actually like that country a lot, but I find it a tad too remote, open, and windswept for my taste. I like woods and rivers a bit better.
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Old 11-06-2009, 10:40 AM
Status: "Fall is almost over!" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
69,637 posts, read 59,710,798 times
Reputation: 19961
My nephew moved to Pittsburgh with his wife in 2006. She is a native Coloradan. What she felt positive about Pgh: a great "sense of place" (her words", she loved Shadyside. Negatives: everyone has so much family that they weren't interested in making new friends, gloomy winter.
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Old 11-06-2009, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Under Mount Doom
9,138 posts, read 5,972,454 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by creepsinc View Post
I lived out West for almost a decade, and the biggest difference is the lack of pretension here. The horrible smugness of the Bay Area and Seattle were my biggest complaints, by far (followed by the astronomical cost of living, of course, and the never-ending sea of "humanity" in San Francisco coming in third). Sure, you give up some things (Asian restaurants on every corner, for instance), but I haven't missed much so far. It's been a little over two years, so that could change, but I don't see it happening. Also, despite how much people whine about the weather here, I think it's great and the presence of four distinct seasons is great, too. Bring on the winter!
Wow! Everything you say rings true with my tastes as well. I live in a town inundated by Bay Area folks, and the smugness is palpable. Though I will grant they are an innovative bunch, and generous politically (the value education). As a boy who grew up on "Oklahoma by the Sea" (S. San Joaquin Valley), I have noted the Coastal Cal. self-satisfaction my whole life. Ernst Callenbach's book Ecotopia captures the end game quite well.. So. Cal folks seems a bit better somehow, not sure why, plenty of liposuction and botox, but strangely a bit less self-satisfaction...

I agree, a bit of rain and distinct, but not-too-severe seasons is actually quite pleasant to me. It mixes things up. I know people complain about the rain and clouds here in Oregon, but I enjoy the changes, and can really appreciate a sunny day when it does come in winter.
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Old 11-06-2009, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Under Mount Doom
9,138 posts, read 5,972,454 times
Reputation: 4672
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Negatives: everyone has so much family that they weren't interested in making new friends, gloomy winter.
Many places would seem gloomy after Colorado winters. I still miss all that sun in winter, but my wife did not care for the cold. Funny, when we moved to Corvallis, Oregon it rained almost 80 inches the first winter, with 8 inches in April. What a change...and my wife, of course, loved it! We have loved Oregon too. Your mountains are high than ours, but our trees are way bigger! The cool sense of place in Pittsburgh was definitely a discovery for me, and I can't wait to see it for myself!
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Old 11-06-2009, 11:44 AM
 
367 posts, read 560,461 times
Reputation: 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fiddlehead View Post
Thanks Heit,

Great to get your perspective after traveling. I like all the things you mentioned as well.

One interesting side topic is that most parents want to raise their kids in upper middle class or higher environs, if they can afford it. Yet, I agree that humility, a work ethic (no one owes you a dime, and you have to bust your butt to succeed ANYWHERE), and a down-to-earth perspective when dealing with others are all very positive in my mind. Yet, folks are always pushing to get their kids in the most affluent neighborhoods or private school. I think many of those kids end up with a feeling of entitlement and a weak grasp of how to work for their goals and respect others, even the poor.

I know what you mean about Cheyenne. It is certainly a beautiful area, but Wyoming is not for all. I actually like that country a lot, but I find it a tad too remote, open, and windswept for my taste. I like woods and rivers a bit better.
Totally agree. If you provide everything for your children......"give-give-give", how are they ever going to learn to appreciate anything. They end up with this(as you said) entitlement mentality with a bad attitude to match. The best thing even the wealthiest of parents can do for their children is make them learn & earn what life is truly about.

We have friends in Merlin, OR. He works at Three Rivers Hospital. Beautiful area for sure. The trees and The Rogue are hard to beat.

One of the most striking sights you will ever see is the skyline of downtown Pittsburgh after exiting the Fort Pitt Tunnels coming in from Pittsburgh International Airport. I'm not a fan of any BIG city but I can say that The Burgh & San Francisco are two beautiful sights from a far.
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