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Old 11-29-2009, 07:49 PM
Status: "Sky watchin" (set 13 days ago)
 
Location: Under Mount Doom
8,858 posts, read 5,284,996 times
Reputation: 4425
Quote:
Originally Posted by highway29south View Post
I have to beg to differ. Growing up where I did, the accent and language was based on the King's English and though it was twisted a bit with different slang over the years, it wasn't what I hear living in Pittsburgh. I'm not sure of the origins of Pittsburghese, but it seems someone just took a bunch of dialects and threw together whatever to make a language of it's own.

I'm certainly not trying to say one is better than the other, but when you leave Pittsburgh and live elsewhere, you get to understand how unique and unusual the accent and word use is here. I want my children to be able to function anywhere so I expose them to more commonly used words, ones that I grew up with. You have to admit, not many places use "gumband", "pop" or "red up"! Plus, I want them to understand where I grew up, my "heritage" as well.
I am personally a bit cynical about "the King's English," in part because the King was most likely a despot, and the fact that English society was and is grotesquely stratified by class, and the dialects were constructed, at least in part, to categorize people. Add to that that the Kings were for many centuries Anglo-Norman hereditary rulers who insisted on speaking French when their people spoke proto-English (Anglo-Saxon tongues, with Danish thrown in) and various gaelic tongues, and you get a real dog's breakfast. I prefer Spanish for lucidity and consistency, but English certainly does have a rich literature. Point is, I think English has become a great language because of the new additions, not by squelching new dialect and derivatives. In other words, English as a whole is democratic, but proper English is elitist, IMO. So, I am rooting for Pittburghese to survive!
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Old 11-29-2009, 08:02 PM
Status: "Corn well over knee high!" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
67,297 posts, read 54,864,175 times
Reputation: 18700
Cool map, Copa! I also liked the "White Christmas" map.
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Old 11-29-2009, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
481 posts, read 548,243 times
Reputation: 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fiddlehead View Post
So, I am rooting for Pittburghese to survive!
Agreed!
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Old 11-29-2009, 08:26 PM
 
40,244 posts, read 43,061,503 times
Reputation: 25251
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I'd argue that one with you, Hopes. I used two subjects, "yinz" and "to be". So the verb should be plural, ie, ARE not is.
Your mistake was with your punctuation.

Take out the interjection between the commas:

Quote:
Yinz, and leaving out "to be" are poor grammar, not a "heritage" thing.
Yinz, ,not a "heritage" thing.

Incorrect: Yinz are not a "heritage" thing.

Correct: Yinz is not a "heritage" thing.

"Are" would be correct if you grouped "yinz" and "to be" together, but your punctuation destroyed your intention.

Since you decided to put a comma after "Yinz," you separated the two offences into singular by making one an interjection, which made "is" the appropriate verb.

Any of the following would have been accurate:

Yinz, and leaving out "to be," is poor grammar, not a "heritage" thing. (Note the additional comma. A sentence should stand on its own when you take out interjections.)

Yinz and "leaving out to be" are poor grammar, not a "heritage" thing.

I wouldn't have mentioned it. I just thought it was funny since you brought up poor grammar.
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Old 11-29-2009, 08:31 PM
 
40,244 posts, read 43,061,503 times
Reputation: 25251
Quote:
Originally Posted by Copanut View Post
The Great Pop v Soda Debate

I think it's funny that the South calls everything coke.

I'm most interested in knowing what words are used by the "OTHER" areas of the country.
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Old 11-29-2009, 08:34 PM
 
7 posts, read 15,751 times
Reputation: 11
I moved here from Florida 5 years ago. Only 5 years and I'm taking on some of the accent like "dahn-tahn" and the "haus". I'm resisting with all my might calling soda "pop" but have given in to calling shopping carts "buggies". No "yinz"ing though. It will always be "y'all" to me. I'm making up my own dialect I guess.
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Old 11-29-2009, 08:34 PM
 
20,274 posts, read 17,240,380 times
Reputation: 2801
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fiddlehead View Post
Point is, I think English has become a great language because of the new additions, not by squelching new dialect and derivatives. In other words, English as a whole is democratic, but proper English is elitist, IMO. So, I am rooting for Pittburghese to survive!
I couldn't agree more. The biggest practical issue is people viewing other people who speak relatively uncommon dialects as uneducated and otherwise backward, but that is an unjustified attitude and I hope it doesn't win the day.
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Old 11-29-2009, 08:38 PM
Status: "Sky watchin" (set 13 days ago)
 
Location: Under Mount Doom
8,858 posts, read 5,284,996 times
Reputation: 4425
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Cool map, Copa! I also liked the "White Christmas" map.
Agreed!
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Old 11-29-2009, 09:11 PM
 
Location: western PA
128 posts, read 196,937 times
Reputation: 65
Along the lines of the South calling all drinks "Coke," a friend of mine from Nepal told me that all cereals in the grocery store there are referred to as "Corn Flakes," as in, "I am going to get some Corn Flakes," even if the person is buying Raisin Bran, or anything else. Funny.
I am from near Pgh, and I was telling my friend something about a tiger once, and she was looking at me like she couldn't understand what in the world I was saying--finally, after I repeated the word "tiger" to her 5 times, she finally said, Oh, tIger (with a long I). Apparently, I pronounce it like "tagger"--is that normal for Pgh or just my own strange accent?
I am in TN right now, and my dogs are learning the word "yonder" from the neighbor. When she throws their toys, and they don't see where it is at first, she tells them, "yonder it is." They will be bilingual. LOL
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Old 11-29-2009, 09:34 PM
 
40,244 posts, read 43,061,503 times
Reputation: 25251
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoss View Post
Along the lines of the South calling all drinks "Coke," a friend of mine from Nepal told me that all cereals in the grocery store there are referred to as "Corn Flakes," as in, "I am going to get some Corn Flakes," even if the person is buying Raisin Bran, or anything else.
That is funny. I would be expecting Corn Flakes!

Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoss View Post
I am from near Pgh, and I was telling my friend something about a tiger once, and she was looking at me like she couldn't understand what in the world I was saying--finally, after I repeated the word "tiger" to her 5 times, she finally said, Oh, tIger (with a long I). Apparently, I pronounce it like "tagger"--is that normal for Pgh or just my own strange accent?
I've never heard that! I say tIger. Maybe someone else will know. I don't hear Pittsburghese very often.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoss View Post
I am in TN right now, and my dogs are learning the word "yonder" from the neighbor. When she throws their toys, and they don't see where it is at first, she tells them, "yonder it is." They will be bilingual. LOL
Bilingual dogs! Cute!
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