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Old 12-18-2009, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Hell with the lid off, baby!
2,197 posts, read 3,933,425 times
Reputation: 372

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SewickleyPA View Post
I love it when people throw down the "everyone in the region is a yinzer" generalization. It's one of my favorites.

It's incredibly ironic since that by failing to research/care that we are one of the top 5 educated metros in the U.S., they are proving that they are just as ignorant and negative as the average yinzer is.
+1
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Old 12-19-2009, 12:03 AM
 
Location: Under Mount Doom
9,189 posts, read 6,016,221 times
Reputation: 4706
This just in on the Fiddlehead wire....

Over on the Academic Job Blog I check out now and again, a post from a Midwestern University was agog at the number of Californian tenure track professors applying for jobs at their jobs at fly-over U. Why would folks leave THERE to come HERE! Not sure how many academics there are, or whether they are indicative of larger populations, but there does seem to be an unprecedented exodus from California going on as we speak, at least in that sector. I think the insane cost of living, horrible commutes, bad air quality, failing schools,crime, and loss of jobs has finally reached parity with the great climate, beaches, mountains, and general coolness factor that have drawn folks to California for the last 50 years or so. You heard it here first at Dystopia Radio!

Whether they are heading to the Burgh, I can't say...
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Old 12-19-2009, 12:16 AM
 
43,017 posts, read 49,727,727 times
Reputation: 28742
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fiddlehead View Post
Whether they are heading to the Burgh, I can't say...
Oh, God! PLEASE not Californians! That would be the worse thing that can happen to Pittsburgh. I'm not just talking their attitudes---that alone is the reason for my "Oh, God!"---but they'll over buy into houses they can't afford. I dont' believe for a minute they learned their lesson with the real estate crash. I think they'll still aspire to own the best of the best. They're used to having a mortgage that's more than half their income. They'll come here with the same calculations. Property values will rise. The keeping up with the Jone's mentality wont' mesh with Pittsburghers. And Pittsburghers are NOT tollerant of people who tell us how wonderful it was where they used to live. If you're miserable in Pittsburgh, leave. This falls under the "Pittsburghers don't care" mentality. As long as your lifestyle doesn't interfere with ours, we're perfectly fine with people. But Pittburghers have NO TIME for people who want to shove their lifestyle and opinions in our faces. We'd much rather everyone just be themselves without expecting us to change or God forbid listen to their complaining.
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Old 12-19-2009, 12:25 AM
 
Location: Chicago
36,415 posts, read 57,359,773 times
Reputation: 25337
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackbeauty212 View Post
Lets Face it the Recession is pretty much the only thing keeping the city from taking off as the Next Boomtown...
Yeah, that and 50 years of inertia in the other direction, and a lingering stigma, and a conservative culture that is hostile to change or innovation, and a hostile business climate, and political stagnation, and weather that most people will pay a premium to not put up with, and...
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Old 12-19-2009, 07:12 AM
 
20,274 posts, read 18,712,700 times
Reputation: 2827
As an aside, I know some Californians in Pittsburgh, and they are fine people who have adjusted comfortably to Pittsburgh. So I think if they come in small numbers at any given time we should be OK--in fact I dare say I wouldn't mind some of the more entrepreneurial Californians coming to set up new businesses here.

Anyway, I was just reading about how historically in the United States we have had high labor mobility between states, which has helped us deal with economic crises nationally even as it has been highly disruptive locally. I believe the statistic was something like that if a state suddenly loses jobs, given typical labor migration patterns it would return to its original unemployment level in about six years, even without adding any new jobs. Pittsburgh, of course, has been on the wrong side of that equation in the relatively recent past during the steel bust.

However, right now the usual levels of labor mobility haven't come into effect because the housing bust is making it hard for a lot of people to move. But meanwhile, unemployment effects are really starting to concentrate, with California and Florida in particular still being hammered as other areas are stabilizing, particularly in the interior of the country (where the housing boom never took off).

So if people start capitulating to the new housing realities and labor mobility picks up, it really wouldn't be surprising if a bunch of people started flowing out of the lingering high unemployment areas and into the low unemployment areas. How much of that would come to Pittsburgh is anyone's guess, but as interior cities go I think we have our charms.
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Old 12-19-2009, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Under Mount Doom
9,189 posts, read 6,016,221 times
Reputation: 4706
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianTH View Post
As an aside, I know some Californians in Pittsburgh, and they are fine people who have adjusted comfortably to Pittsburgh. So I think if they come in small numbers at any given time we should be OK--in fact I dare say I wouldn't mind some of the more entrepreneurial Californians coming to set up new businesses here.

Anyway, I was just reading about how historically in the United States we have had high labor mobility between states, which has helped us deal with economic crises nationally even as it has been highly disruptive locally. I believe the statistic was something like that if a state suddenly loses jobs, given typical labor migration patterns it would return to its original unemployment level in about six years, even without adding any new jobs. Pittsburgh, of course, has been on the wrong side of that equation in the relatively recent past during the steel bust.

However, right now the usual levels of labor mobility haven't come into effect because the housing bust is making it hard for a lot of people to move. But meanwhile, unemployment effects are really starting to concentrate, with California and Florida in particular still being hammered as other areas are stabilizing, particularly in the interior of the country (where the housing boom never took off).

So if people start capitulating to the new housing realities and labor mobility picks up, it really wouldn't be surprising if a bunch of people started flowing out of the lingering high unemployment areas and into the low unemployment areas. How much of that would come to Pittsburgh is anyone's guess, but as interior cities go I think we have our charms.
I am in agreement with Hopes AND BrianTH, amazingly...

Californians can have some very annoying characteristics when they arrive in massive numbers from specific locations. I'll leave that topic until after I have thought about it's comic potential and had a good cup of coffee..

That said, they can be wonderful people, like folks anywhere. And I agree with BrianTH, the creative Californian innovator would be a good addition to Pittsburgh. I really do not think the Burgh is on their radar, but if it were discovered, you might see large influx. Raleigh/Durham and Columbia, MO has seen large immigrations. And although Californians are purported to not like cold and snow, there have been large movements to Bozeman and Butte, MT, Colorado in recent years.

I agree about the labor mobility, and I predict you will see more west to east movement, if that corresponds with better job conditions.
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Old 12-19-2009, 11:22 AM
 
20,274 posts, read 18,712,700 times
Reputation: 2827
Maybe I should stop trying to lend some perspective on Pittsburgh's weather statistics--they may be the only thing keeping the Californians coming in like a plague of property-buying, strange-pizza-eating locusts.

Anyway, it looks likely that if nothing else, over the next few years we are going to get some very useful data. Have the recent migration patterns been driven by climate? Jobs? Some of each? We'll probably find out.

Oh, and Texas may get slammed with domestic refugees if it is some of each, although the state may also spontaneously combust if the acid and base of California and Texas come together in large enough quantities. Tofu BBQ anyone?
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Old 12-19-2009, 11:59 AM
 
Location: RVA
2,415 posts, read 2,975,806 times
Reputation: 1140
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianTH View Post
Maybe I should stop trying to lend some perspective on Pittsburgh's weather statistics--they may be the only thing keeping the Californians coming in like a plague of property-buying, strange-pizza-eating locusts.

Anyway, it looks likely that if nothing else, over the next few years we are going to get some very useful data. Have the recent migration patterns been driven by climate? Jobs? Some of each? We'll probably find out.

Oh, and Texas may get slammed with domestic refugees if it is some of each, although the state may also spontaneously combust if the acid and base of California and Texas come together in large enough quantities. Tofu BBQ anyone?

I'm still hoping Texas follows through on their vague secession threats. It would be hilarious, because they'd be subsumed by Mexico within about two weeks.
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Old 12-19-2009, 12:14 PM
 
20,274 posts, read 18,712,700 times
Reputation: 2827
Of course then Austin would counter-secede, and we would have an Austin airlift.
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Old 12-19-2009, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Morgantown, WV
835 posts, read 1,103,368 times
Reputation: 708
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianTH View Post
Of course then Austin would counter-secede, and we would have an Austin airlift.
I just spit coke all over my screen because of you!!!!!


...
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