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Old 12-16-2009, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Macao
12,930 posts, read 19,501,933 times
Reputation: 6511

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I think Pittsburgh will avoid it.

Mostly because the BOOM seems to come with new construction. The U.S. doesn't seem to produce nearly as much as they use to, but really outdid themselves with building strip malls, suburbs, and the like...and it seems the entire economy was just going on that throughout the Bush Administrations years and post dot.com era.

That entire fiasco was over-inflated as it was. I remember visiting Las Vegas from Japan, and cashing a check in Nevada. The bank teller asked me if I would also like to apply for a half a million dollar loan to buy a house while I was cashing my check!! So, needless to say, the mindset at the time was those low interest rates, everyone should own a home, and all of the spiraling easy access to loans and everything else.

I don't think those times will ever come back again.

ALSO...the other thing...I think most Americans think in terms of big plots of land, big houses, etc...as they percevie as the more isolated and bigger the plot, the more safety they are buying. I even notice it when people inquire about Pittsburgh, they always ask about the nearest safest suburb they can live in and drive into the city from.

To me, Pittsburgh seems pointless to try to live in a big suburb and drive into all of the time. The whole point of the city to me, is you can live in pedestrian-friendly walkable neighborhoods. But, the majority of Americans have never had pedestrian-friendly AND safe combined before. So it isn't on their radar screens.

So, to me, I think Pittsburgh will just attract the kinds of people who are either from Western Pennsylvania...OR they got use to pedestrian-friendly places somewhere else like Boston, NYC, or somewhere...and learn about Pittsburgh being an affordable alternative offering a somewhat similar existance free of mandatory car-dependence.

Just my two cents though...

Additionally, the strong momentum of Americans is still to move southward or westward...being that Pittsburgh is basically northeast and slightly midwest - the two areas where no one seems interested to move to, it'll probably remain without a big boom occuring.

Hopefully there is a little one though...
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Old 12-16-2009, 08:41 PM
 
Location: a swanky suburb in my fancy pants
3,391 posts, read 4,641,669 times
Reputation: 1486
If you are talking about an explosion from a car bomb or somthing like that in a terrorist attack, yea I would say your chances of avoiding such a thing are very good. 1st they would have to hear about Pittsburg and then they would have to find it and be able to get there. Yea I am very sure that you are safe, rest easy.
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Old 12-16-2009, 08:44 PM
 
27,028 posts, read 22,457,124 times
Reputation: 7587
Quote:
Originally Posted by highway29south View Post
Huh? Pittsburgh has never had a "boom" no matter what the economy because it is more than the economy that keeps people away from here.

I would be extremely surprised if we had a sudden influx of people from the outside. My favorite thing to joke with my husband about is the "Pittsburgh Bubble"- in other words, no one leaves, no one comes in. Sure, there are people who go elsewhere sometimes, but hardly anyone comes in. And people seem to only leave if they are forced to for a job.

Where I live now, near the airport, everyone in my neighborhood and everyone I know from my kid's schools to my social circle all grew up here, live here and intend on dying here. They go to school here and know everyone here and they all give each other jobs, homes and other pats on the back. I have lived here 20 years and I have yet to meet more than a handful of people who grew up somewhere else. And the ones I do meet want to leave because of the closed circle here. They don't feel welcome. Sure Pittsburghers are nice. But they have their ways and unless you want to adapt to those ways, you are an outsider. Your way of doing things is not welcome.

The people I know do not want a bunch of outsiders coming in to live here. Outsiders mean change, and Pittsburgh is not big on change. Whenever I have tried to change something, I get met with a brick wall and looks that imply I am insane. No one wants to hear it. And everyone backs them up because they are either related to them, or grew up with them.

So, a boom? No way. A trickle, maybe. But no boom, at least IMHO
Well, I have a friend that went to college with me. After he graduated, he moved to Pittsburgh and he likes it. Maybe his view of Pittsburgh is different because he went to the city with the perspective of not being from the USA(he is Kenyan).
As for more people coming in, well, I have heard about some of the younger people leaving because they feel like Pittsburgh doesn't have what they need as young people. If more young people came to Pittsburgh, perhaps the young that are there might be encouraged to stay. I know of a few people in Atlanta who are club promoters and maybe they might have alot of business in PGH if they started up a few clubs.
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Old 12-16-2009, 08:47 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
1,137 posts, read 1,756,969 times
Reputation: 1097
Quote:
Originally Posted by Copanut View Post
Maybe it's because you and all your friends are Neanderthals.

I get so tired of hearing this crap about Pgh'ers not warming up to those that come to live here. BS, in my mind. I go out of my way to welcome anyone new in my neighborhood. Hell, 25 years ago when I lived in Greentree my wife, who was not my wife at the time, made sure that every out of towner in our apartment building that couldn't go home for Thanksgiving or Christmas due to work had a place at her table.

And since we were married we carry on that tradition.

As to a boom in Pgh, not gonna happen until we get rid of the Democratic stronghold on the city and county.

This area has a lot to offer, we don't have an Ocean, we don't have a ton of sunny skies, but we have affordable housing and in my mind, a local population with a strong work ethic.
Well, this is exactly what I am talking about. My views are different and I instantly get attacked and called names. And we wonder why there isn't a boom in Pittsburgh
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Old 12-16-2009, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Under Mount Doom
9,130 posts, read 5,965,617 times
Reputation: 4661
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
I think Pittsburgh will avoid it.

Mostly because the BOOM seems to come with new construction. The U.S. doesn't seem to produce nearly as much as they use to, but really outdid themselves with building strip malls, suburbs, and the like...and it seems the entire economy was just going on that throughout the Bush Administrations years and post dot.com era.

That entire fiasco was over-inflated as it was. I remember visiting Las Vegas from Japan, and cashing a check in Nevada. The bank teller asked me if I would also like to apply for a half a million dollar loan to buy a house while I was cashing my check!! So, needless to say, the mindset at the time was those low interest rates, everyone should own a home, and all of the spiraling easy access to loans and everything else.

I don't think those times will ever come back again.

ALSO...the other thing...I think most Americans think in terms of big plots of land, big houses, etc...as they percevie as the more isolated and bigger the plot, the more safety they are buying. I even notice it when people inquire about Pittsburgh, they always ask about the nearest safest suburb they can live in and drive into the city from.

To me, Pittsburgh seems pointless to try to live in a big suburb and drive into all of the time. The whole point of the city to me, is you can live in pedestrian-friendly walkable neighborhoods. But, the majority of Americans have never had pedestrian-friendly AND safe combined before. So it isn't on their radar screens.

So, to me, I think Pittsburgh will just attract the kinds of people who are either from Western Pennsylvania...OR they got use to pedestrian-friendly places somewhere else like Boston, NYC, or somewhere...and learn about Pittsburgh being an affordable alternative offering a somewhat similar existance free of mandatory car-dependence.

Just my two cents though...

Additionally, the strong momentum of Americans is still to move southward or westward...being that Pittsburgh is basically northeast and slightly midwest - the two areas where no one seems interested to move to, it'll probably remain without a big boom occuring.

Hopefully there is a little one though...
Excellent post TB,

I do think the Southward and Westward trend will abate and locally reverse, but I must admit that the things most people on this board love about the Burgh probably would not appeal to most Americans. When looking at homes in Durham/Chapel Hill, NC I think I saw the overarching trend. Low density sprawl with new 3-4000 sf homes in say 5 styles on 0.5-1 acre lots in gated communities with the poor kept out, and private schools. That is not Pittsburgh.
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Old 12-16-2009, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Under Mount Doom
9,130 posts, read 5,965,617 times
Reputation: 4661
Quote:
Originally Posted by highway29south View Post
Well, this is exactly what I am talking about. My views are different and I instantly get attacked and called names. And we wonder why there isn't a boom in Pittsburgh
Agreed. Crappy post Copanut. You usually have great input, but being so insulting that you kill the debate is just lame.

As for whether the Burgh will boom, who the hell knows? One could mount an interesting argument either way. I thought that was the point.
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Old 12-16-2009, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Great White North Hills
8,423 posts, read 7,584,571 times
Reputation: 4611
Fine, I humbly apologize. But if all highway 29 south's friends are close minded, whose fault is that? I don't see that as a Pgh wide mind-set, I grew up low blue collar and was always taught to accept people from all walks of life.

I just get tired when local yinzers generalize.
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Old 12-16-2009, 09:33 PM
 
Location: NOT a native Pittsburgher
323 posts, read 513,944 times
Reputation: 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by highway29south View Post
Huh? Pittsburgh has never had a "boom" no matter what the economy because it is more than the economy that keeps people away from here.

I would be extremely surprised if we had a sudden influx of people from the outside. My favorite thing to joke with my husband about is the "Pittsburgh Bubble"- in other words, no one leaves, no one comes in. Sure, there are people who go elsewhere sometimes, but hardly anyone comes in. And people seem to only leave if they are forced to for a job.

Where I live now, near the airport, everyone in my neighborhood and everyone I know from my kid's schools to my social circle all grew up here, live here and intend on dying here. They go to school here and know everyone here and they all give each other jobs, homes and other pats on the back. I have lived here 20 years and I have yet to meet more than a handful of people who grew up somewhere else. And the ones I do meet want to leave because of the closed circle here. They don't feel welcome. Sure Pittsburghers are nice. But they have their ways and unless you want to adapt to those ways, you are an outsider. Your way of doing things is not welcome.

The people I know do not want a bunch of outsiders coming in to live here. Outsiders mean change, and Pittsburgh is not big on change. Whenever I have tried to change something, I get met with a brick wall and looks that imply I am insane. No one wants to hear it. And everyone backs them up because they are either related to them, or grew up with them.

So, a boom? No way. A trickle, maybe. But no boom, at least IMHO
Big mistake. You can't post any type of criticism on this board. The cheerleaders won't have it. Sorry for the personal attacks you received after making your post.
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Old 12-16-2009, 10:03 PM
 
20,274 posts, read 18,616,125 times
Reputation: 2827
The thing is that I think there are decent reasons to think some of the post-WWII population trends may be in the process of shifting. There are lots of mechanisms that are starting to push in the same direction: congestion and commuting times; energy costs; environmental concerns; an aging population; more pro-urban and less race-conscious feelings among youth; and so on. And even if the overall shift in trends is fairly glacial, you could have localized effects that are much more dramatic.

In fact I think we have already seen some concentrated localized effects, such as the rapid rise of prices for housing in the more popular urban centers. Now of course some of that was housing-bubble related--but not all of it, as demonstrated by the fact that those places aren't typically seeing anything close to a full reversal of that appreciation (not yet, anyway).

And in the greater scheme of things, Pittsburgh isn't that big of a place. So just a little shifting of national trends, that for some reason have a concentrated impact in Pittsburgh, and voila--you could have a significant local impact fairly rapidly. I mean, just think if Pittsburgh became the next hot NYC neighborhood--of course that can't really happen in such simple terms, but I think the basic concept is potentially applicable.

Not that I am necessarily predicting all this. But I wouldn't rule it out either.
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Old 12-16-2009, 10:19 PM
 
1,720 posts, read 2,442,155 times
Reputation: 1207
It is never easy to predict demographic trends. Would people of the 1950's ever have envisioned the collapse of the steel and auto industries? Would it ever have been imagined that certain established eastern cities would lose half of their populations and far-off Western cities would explode in growth? Could they have seen working-class and middle-class jobs leaving the country and being taken over by Chinese and Indians? The plain truth is that we don't know what will happen in the future; economically, demographically, or politically.

The worst from the steel collapse is over and things have stabilized. The only way that this area can regain population and clout is if the population rises and the local economy improves. The Marcellus Shale thingee might help. Prohibitive living costs in other cities might make our area look more attractive as well. But, will this city ever have 600,000 residents again? I doubt it. The jobs aren't here and the weather sucks.
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