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Old 09-28-2010, 09:37 PM
 
Location: Northern Wi
1,530 posts, read 1,174,704 times
Reputation: 420

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There are hundreds of sites out there to explain all the weather modification programs going on. They are the one's who are putting this area in crisis. They have been controlling our weather for quite awhile. I'm sure as time progresses, since the federal government owns most of the SW, people will have to relocate or pay big bucks to them for water. They are looking for total federal government control of ALL our water. Either way, the federal government comes to the rescue with droughts, floods, whatever they choose too. Just another form of controll over our life.

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Weather Modification a Long-Established, Though Secretive, Reality

The Devil’s HAARP weather weapons and recent “natural” disasters Global Redr

Atmospheric Geoengineering Weather Manipulation, Contrails and Chemtrails (Rev
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Old 09-28-2010, 10:33 PM
 
5,038 posts, read 4,431,563 times
Reputation: 2920
Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
People get tired of living in the same climate all their life. My family got tired of living between the Tropic of Cancer and the Equator (amongst other reasons) so we moved and the cool air in the fall feels great . Most people think of the Earth south of the Tropic of Cancer as like pleasant 85 degrees in December. I think of it as a very humid and rainy 100-110 from March till October . But unfortunately it's true thogh the southwest does have a maximum cap of people it can support through the amount of water the area has and the northeast has rain in excess of 35-40 inches per year (on average) and a low evaporation rate. But if you want people to live in the Northeast and Upper Midwest again, then you guys seriously need to lower your tax burdens, which is the #1 reason why people move out of the Northeast and Upper Midwest. The climate is just an incidental
Oh trust me, you don't need to tell me that the tax burden is unreasonable here. That said, the reason many Northeast/Midwest states have such taxes is because we get way less per capita federal aid than the Sunbelt. The Northeast/Midwest basically subsidized the federal government's building up the Sunbelt, which then took people away from the Northeast/Midwest.

Did I sound bitter there.
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Old 09-29-2010, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Arizona High Desert
4,611 posts, read 4,524,844 times
Reputation: 2633
We should bring back cisterns to collect rainwater that can be used for irrigation, etc. Give tax breaks for having one properly installed. Vegas actually floods sometimes, and it's too bad that they don't have better water storage plans for downpours. I recycle my greywater, and have an underground tank. Haul my own water to fill the tank, an $ave a bundle by not having city water.
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Old 09-29-2010, 05:32 PM
 
528 posts, read 353,667 times
Reputation: 255
Quote:
Originally Posted by stillkit View Post
It's not just the Southwest. The deep south is facing the same problem, believe it or not, especially Atlanta.

The truth is that water will be the next big issue everywhere except probably downstream on the east side of the Appalachian's and around the Great Lakes.

Speaking of the lakes, there's enough fresh water there to meet our needs for a long time, but too many states and two different countries have claims on it, making it's use for other parts of the country a nightmare of legal wrangling.
Yeah, the rest of the country better keep their pipes and buckets out of our lakes- dont worry the asian carp will clog the great lakes in a few decades if you belive the fear mongers trying to keep it from getting into lake michigan
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Old 09-29-2010, 05:44 PM
 
Location: FLG/PHX/MKE
7,235 posts, read 11,292,635 times
Reputation: 11308
Yep, and I read doomsday predictions in the late 80s or early 90s that professed very articulately, that the desert southwest was unsustainable past 1998, and that droves of people would leave because there would be no water.

Southern Arizona is only 150 miles from a huge body of salt water, and no plans to begin desalination even exist at this time, that I am aware of. But the option is there.
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Old 09-29-2010, 06:40 PM
 
665 posts, read 576,025 times
Reputation: 903
Nuclear power plant with a desalination plant next door. Energy and water crisis solved, but the extremist environmental wackos don't want anymore nuclear plants in this country.
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Old 09-29-2010, 07:33 PM
 
24,136 posts, read 18,814,334 times
Reputation: 10985
Quote:
Originally Posted by mn311601 View Post
Nuclear power plant with a desalination plant next door. Energy and water crisis solved, but the extremist environmental wackos don't want anymore nuclear plants in this country.
Ironically nuclear energy is clean and safe. And contrary to popular belief, you can recycle and reuse spent nuclear fuel rods, without having to bury them in the mountains in Nevada for example, and you can reuse most of the spent uranium as well. The only drawback is cost. And if you have a desalination plant hooked up to a nuclear power plant nearby, then the sheeple of left-wing AGW propaganda don't have to get their drawers in a bunch over CO2 emissions
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Old 09-29-2010, 07:47 PM
 
Location: Toledo
3,860 posts, read 6,905,725 times
Reputation: 3632
Quote:
Originally Posted by stillkit View Post
It's not just the Southwest. The deep south is facing the same problem, believe it or not, especially Atlanta.

The truth is that water will be the next big issue everywhere except probably downstream on the east side of the Appalachian's and around the Great Lakes.

Speaking of the lakes, there's enough fresh water there to meet our needs for a long time, but too many states and two different countries have claims on it, making it's use for other parts of the country a nightmare of legal wrangling.
And it should remain that way.
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Old 09-29-2010, 08:15 PM
 
2,671 posts, read 2,428,115 times
Reputation: 1951
People, just remember there are Natives who lived in the Southwestern region for eons before the Europeans immigrated to North America. They knew how to live there, and it's partly the reason for the success of Geronimo and his tiny band of fighters against the massive American Calvary. Of course, this was before technology screwed up the Colorado River system.

There was and is the acequia association in New Mexico, too. I know almost nothing about it other than they have communually managed and protected water for irrigation and other uses for a long time.

Someone mentioned the legal wranglings of water rights between counties and states. Take a look at what El Paso, TX is doing. The citizens fought the conservation and long term planning to conserve and protect their water, but now it's working well for them. Oh yeah, they work cooperatively with Mexico. There's a great article on it in Grist.org
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Old 09-29-2010, 08:20 PM
 
Location: San Antonio Texas
11,435 posts, read 14,475,025 times
Reputation: 5224
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ecovlke View Post
People, just remember there are Natives who lived in the Southwestern region for eons before the Europeans immigrated to North America. They knew how to live there, and it's partly the reason for the success of Geronimo and his tiny band of fighters against the massive American Calvary. Of course, this was before technology screwed up the Colorado River system.

There was and is the acequia association in New Mexico, too. I know almost nothing about it other than they have communually managed and protected water for irrigation and other uses for a long time.

Someone mentioned the legal wranglings of water rights between counties and states. Take a look at what El Paso, TX is doing. The citizens fought the conservation and long term planning to conserve and protect their water, but now it's working well for them. Oh yeah, they work cooperatively with Mexico. There's a great article on it in Grist.org
The natives that you talk about didn't number in the millions, did they?
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