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Old 09-28-2010, 08:07 PM
 
5,721 posts, read 5,156,707 times
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http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/28/us/28mead.html

These Southwestern cities just aren't sustainable. I've always said the Northeast and Midwest would be reborn when the Southwest dried up--and it could happen sooner than anyone thought. There's a reason these areas were sparsely settled until technology made it possible to live there. Humans aren't supposed to be able to live in the desert.

The rust belt with its plentiful water supply--which funded the construction of Southwestern infrastructure--will rise again soon.
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Old 09-28-2010, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Prepperland
12,938 posts, read 8,993,163 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by juppiter View Post
Humans aren't supposed to be able to live in the desert.
By that logic, humans should not live where they need to wear clothes - or live in shelters from climate extremes - nor grow food that can't be found naturally growing where they are.
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Old 09-28-2010, 08:52 PM
 
25,060 posts, read 21,753,003 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by juppiter View Post
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/28/us/28mead.html

These Southwestern cities just aren't sustainable. I've always said the Northeast and Midwest would be reborn when the Southwest dried up--and it could happen sooner than anyone thought. There's a reason these areas were sparsely settled until technology made it possible to live there. Humans aren't supposed to be able to live in the desert.

The rust belt with its plentiful water supply--which funded the construction of Southwestern infrastructure--will rise again soon.
People get tired of living in the same climate all their life. My family got tired of living between the Tropic of Cancer and the Equator (amongst other reasons) so we moved and the cool air in the fall feels great . Most people think of the Earth south of the Tropic of Cancer as like pleasant 85 degrees in December. I think of it as a very humid and rainy 100-110 from March till October . But unfortunately it's true thogh the southwest does have a maximum cap of people it can support through the amount of water the area has and the northeast has rain in excess of 35-40 inches per year (on average) and a low evaporation rate. But if you want people to live in the Northeast and Upper Midwest again, then you guys seriously need to lower your tax burdens, which is the #1 reason why people move out of the Northeast and Upper Midwest. The climate is just an incidental
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Old 09-28-2010, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Land of debt and Corruption
7,526 posts, read 6,878,691 times
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The water dilemma in the SW is dire, but I fail to see how the demise of the SW will cause a rise in the NE.
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Old 09-28-2010, 09:10 PM
 
953 posts, read 730,106 times
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Across the vast expanses of the Universe, as far as we can discern,

humans only live in a tiny envelope of atmosphere.

On the earth's surface, to an elevation of about 15,000 ft---and where access to water is possible.



“We have a very finite resource and demand which increases and enlarges every day,” said John A. Zebre...

The problem is always going to be there,” he said. “Everything is driven by that problem.”
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Old 09-28-2010, 09:25 PM
 
3,806 posts, read 4,934,788 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by juppiter View Post
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/28/us/28mead.html

These Southwestern cities just aren't sustainable. I've always said the Northeast and Midwest would be reborn when the Southwest dried up--and it could happen sooner than anyone thought. There's a reason these areas were sparsely settled until technology made it possible to live there. Humans aren't supposed to be able to live in the desert.

The rust belt with its plentiful water supply--which funded the construction of Southwestern infrastructure--will rise again soon.
I bolded the part where you eviscerated your own argument. The Pacific Ocean has what is effectively an unlimited supply of water. All you have to do is desalinate it. If California refuses I'm sure Mexico would jump at the chance to sell desalinated water from the Gulf of California to the US.
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Old 09-28-2010, 09:27 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,391 posts, read 97,531,796 times
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Never underestimate the ability of human beings to adapt.
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Old 09-28-2010, 09:30 PM
 
Location: mancos
7,025 posts, read 6,079,242 times
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the southwest has always been this way our saying is,whiskey is for drinking,water is for fighting over. mix in a little profit and it gets worse
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Old 09-28-2010, 09:33 PM
 
16,544 posts, read 18,656,744 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by juppiter View Post
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/28/us/28mead.html

These Southwestern cities just aren't sustainable. I've always said the Northeast and Midwest would be reborn when the Southwest dried up--and it could happen sooner than anyone thought. There's a reason these areas were sparsely settled until technology made it possible to live there. Humans aren't supposed to be able to live in the desert.

The rust belt with its plentiful water supply--which funded the construction of Southwestern infrastructure--will rise again soon.
It was the NUMBER ONE reason I never bought property in Las Vegas... I liked Vegas but I figure it would never really last.. a city with no private water supply is a city that won't last too long... I imagine Vegas will be a ghost town one day... was really tempted to buy a property but I figure my heirs won't like living on a piece of land with no running water... humans cannot adapt to living without water unless you like eating insects and living in holes... I highly doubt they would move to the NE.... they probably move to California...
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Old 09-28-2010, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Texas
14,079 posts, read 16,826,064 times
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It's not just the Southwest. The deep south is facing the same problem, believe it or not, especially Atlanta.

The truth is that water will be the next big issue everywhere except probably downstream on the east side of the Appalachian's and around the Great Lakes.

Speaking of the lakes, there's enough fresh water there to meet our needs for a long time, but too many states and two different countries have claims on it, making it's use for other parts of the country a nightmare of legal wrangling.
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