U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Politics and Other Controversies
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-12-2010, 01:05 PM
 
29,988 posts, read 35,848,534 times
Reputation: 12719

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
When I was a a cashier or counter-server (barista-type person), we had a tip jar. It wasn't intended for actual "tips" - but more a way of letting people know that if they didn't want to keep their change, it -would- definitely go to the crew, and not to the owner's pocket. In other words, the owner _allowed_ us to share whatever extra money was taken in that shift. ............
Talk about splitting hairs. It is a tip jar, plain and simple, any way you slice it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-12-2010, 01:10 PM
 
20,419 posts, read 26,544,024 times
Reputation: 13114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ibginnie View Post
I believe that the point in the OP was that many counter people and cashiers ARE expecting a tip these days.

In my local pizza joint, there is a tip jar beside the cash register. It has a sign that all tips are split among the crew at the end of the shift. That means the cashier, the counter help, the sandwich makers, and the pie throwers all split the tips. All of these workers receive, at least, minimum wage.

I, too, use the zero with the line through it when signing my credit card slip.
At my son's little (seasonal) restaurant last summer...he held off on a tip jar for quite awhile. But the customers kept asking where it was. There was a lot of take out orders--not fast food at all, even the bread for sandwiches was made right there--as the chef/owner, he never kept a tip, but people kept asking where the jar was. The servers appreciated it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2010, 01:15 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,217 posts, read 7,343,646 times
Reputation: 7040
I don't believe it's right to expect a tip at a drive-through window, either, as a matter of principle. Our local Starbucks has had their tip jar out for a couple of years now and although we go there 2-3 times a week I've yet to put a single penny in. At sit-down restaurants we tip 20%-25%. The latter at momma-poppy places and 20% at chains and high-end places.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2010, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Massapequa Park
3,173 posts, read 5,666,893 times
Reputation: 1349
Quote:
Originally Posted by azriverfan. View Post
This weekend, I noticed two ridiculous examples of pandering for tips. The Starbucks drive-thru had a tip container built into the cashier window. Okay, they already charge a ridiculous amount of money for coffee and they expect a tip on top of that? I paid $8 for two grande coffees and they want a tip too? What do they do that is any different than a Taco Bell worker? In fact, the Taco Bell worker does more work. The Starbucks worker simply pours some coffee into a cup, some non-fat milk and a pump of peppermint flavor from a plastic container and that warrants $1-2 in tips?

The second example is at Pappa Johns pizza. At Pappa John, they had a tip cup for people carrying out pizza. If you order delivery, you are required to pay a Delivery Charge and are expected to tip the Driver. So when I pick up pizza, I'm supposed to tip too now? Well helI, why don't I just tip the guy at Wendys who makes my burger while I'm at it or how about cashier at Wal-Mart for bagging my merchandise.

Tipping is ridiculous. When I went to pick up my pizza, I wrote a big fat zero with a line crossed through it indicating no tip and the cashier gave me a dirty look. Don't pander to these people by tipping them. I'm a great tipper when it is warranted (dining in a restaurant) but unnecessary tipping leads to more unnecessary tipping. For example at a hotel, you can end up broke tipping people (the person who opens your cab door, the person who takes your luggage to the room, the maids, and when you leave the hotel to venture into the city, you are supposed to tip the person who calls your cab and then the person who then opens your cab door. I understand tipping the bell hop who brings your luggage to the room but why do I need to tip someone for opening a cab door, I can do that on my own, I don't need to give you $2-$3 for doing that.

You should tip generously when it is warranted and when someone has gone out of their way to provide good service. But mindless tipping is unwarranted and sets a poor precedent. According to Judith Martin, the infamous "Miss Manners" and authority on etiquette, you are not expected to tip for picking up food because several costs are built into a food item. For example, restaurant food includes not only the price of the food itself but also the accoutrements involved with the restaurant such as the furniture, ambience (music, scene of the ocean etc) yet when carrying out food, you are not receiving any of those services yet are paying for it so it is not customary to tip in these cases.
I agree, it's out of hand. The business likes putting these tip jars in the hope that they "catch on" ..so they can pay their workers less. Don't fall for it. Some instances though I believe call for a tip. Like when you order at a diner. The waitress puts your order together (ie- salads, condiments, cole slaw etc..) so I do tip diner workers even for takeout. If the employee has a "server" type pay, like bartender, waiter etc.. that calls for a tip when they handle any order for you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2010, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Northeast
1,377 posts, read 848,712 times
Reputation: 406
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metlakatla View Post
At my son's little (seasonal) restaurant last summer...he held off on a tip jar for quite awhile. But the customers kept asking where it was. There was a lot of take out orders--not fast food at all, even the bread for sandwiches was made right there--as the chef/owner, he never kept a tip, but people kept asking where the jar was. The servers appreciated it.
They still do a job whether you stay or go. You don't need to leave 15 or 20% spare change will do. If you go to the place often it may help you avoid something extra in you food or drink
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2010, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Pa
20,310 posts, read 18,881,481 times
Reputation: 6517
I tip 15% for average service and 20% for good service.
Bad service gets nothing.
I will not frequent places that factor their own tip in and give you no choice.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2010, 01:31 PM
 
20,419 posts, read 26,544,024 times
Reputation: 13114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pequaman View Post
I agree, it's out of hand. The business likes putting these tip jars in the hope that they "catch on" ..so they can pay their workers less. Don't fall for it. Some instances though I believe call for a tip. Like when you order at a diner. The waitress puts your order together (ie- salads, condiments, cole slaw etc..) so I do tip diner workers even for takeout. If the employee has a "server" type pay, like bartender, waiter etc.. that calls for a tip when they handle any order for you.
I'm not sure it works that way. I think that counter workers legally have to be paid at least min. wage, even in right to work states.

I'm not so sure it's an easy position for business owners to be in. My son was adamant about not having a tip jar, but the customers kept asking where it was. It didn't seem fair to deprive the servers of that extra income. And no, their wages didn't go down as a result.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2010, 01:57 PM
 
5,721 posts, read 5,237,432 times
Reputation: 3603
Quote:
Originally Posted by azriverfan. View Post
Tipping is ridiculous. When I went to pick up my pizza, I wrote a big fat zero with a line crossed through it indicating no tip and the cashier gave me a dirty look. Don't pander to these people by tipping them. I'm a great tipper when it is warranted (dining in a restaurant) but unnecessary tipping leads to more unnecessary tipping. For example at a hotel, you can end up broke tipping people
That reminds me of an episode of "Curb Your Enthusiasm."

Anyway, I think writing a zero was a bit rude. I agree, if I'm driving to pick up pizza (which I always do instead of having it delivered to save money) there is no way I would tip. But I would most likely just leave the tip line blank. It's not that the cashier "expects" a tip, for all you know management put the jar there.

Though if I were paying with cash and I got pennies back as change I would most likely leave them. I hate pennies.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2010, 02:17 PM
 
7,022 posts, read 5,772,668 times
Reputation: 6963
The Tip Jars are out of control, offensive (to me), and probably illegal (I think).

The tip jar phenom began at 7-Eleven years ago when somebody put out a tray of pennies for customers who were short on change to take-one or leave-one. Eventually people began dumping their extra change into the jars. Other businesses saw what 7-Eleven was doing, and suddenly "Tip Jars" were everywhere.

I just completely ignore them. I tip at restaurants, the hair salon, doormen, etc. where people are supposed to be tipped, but tipping at coffee shops is unnecessary and unwarranted.

Quote:
Originally Posted by juppiter View Post
I think writing a zero was a bit rude. ... But I would most likely just leave the tip line blank.
Writing a zero isn't a rude, it's a good safeguard to prevent cashiers from writing in a tip and having it charged to your credit card. A lot of people wouldn't notice the extra charge on their statements the following month so then the store gets a free, unauthorized tip.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2010, 03:03 PM
 
3,111 posts, read 6,742,633 times
Reputation: 4244
I think it is ridiculous as well, however, it does seem to work. Every time I see one, it does have some money in it. I once asked the person at Subway, why they had a tip jar. She responded by comparing it to delivering pizzas. Needless to say, I pointed it out to her that she was not delivering my sandwich. Then she told me it was for good customer service.

I left it at that, but still amusing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Politics and Other Controversies
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top