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Old 12-13-2010, 07:06 AM
 
3,129 posts, read 5,142,402 times
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If people want tips they should work in an industry where you earn tips and your wage is lower. So you want to make your regular wage and get tipped? No thanks, I rarely do.

I am a great tipper when it is appropriate in the appropriate setting. I am not going to tip you FOR DOING THE BARE MINIMUM and DOING YOUR JOB. That is what you were HIRED TO DO.

I'm not going to knock people for trying and having their tip jars but I usually ignore them.
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Old 12-13-2010, 07:39 AM
 
11,015 posts, read 21,568,106 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
How can it be taxed when it never shows up in any documents? At least in most parts of Europe we just leave coins (and even bills) on the table in a restaurant or we slip them right into the hairdresser's apron pocket.
ALL tips are suppose to be taxed. I know a ton of friends in the restaurant and bar business, and some of my best friends own a bar.

It's all just a game. Normally tips on credit cards are always taxed, because you can't hide them. Those normally get added up and put on the employees paycheck. Cash tips are suppose to be taxed in the same manner, but never ever are - unless I suppose you have a REALLY anal employer. Employees in the industry though would certainly look down upon that restaurant/bar though as far as working there.

When I did the books, it was normally a standard 8-10% that was declared, to keep the IRS from getting involved and asking why tips were so low. That was normally just a fraction of the tips received. My friend gets around $800-$1,000 a week in cash tips (and only 22 years old - that rat!), but on his paycheck its around $100-$200 in taxable tips per week.
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Old 12-13-2010, 07:46 AM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
19,865 posts, read 18,312,135 times
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And the IRS knows about that situation I assume
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Old 12-13-2010, 08:29 AM
 
1,561 posts, read 1,605,912 times
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In the past I've waited tables and still work a bartender shift every now and then and I never tip when I pickup a pizza. Delivery is different. I will always tip the driver as they are saving me the trip. The amount of tip depends on the delivery charge. If it is small or non existant I give the pizza guy a few bucks. If it is high then they get little from me.


Question for everyone. I just moved and plan on furnishing my apartment with new furniture... couch, dresser, bedroom set... the works. Every place I've gone to charges a delivery fee (I'm NOT lugging this stuff up to the third floor). Do I need to tip the delivery guys if I'm already paying a $50 delivery fee?
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Old 12-13-2010, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Atlanta metro
5,645 posts, read 3,972,652 times
Reputation: 982
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mircea View Post
Those are the only service people you need to tip, with maybe one or two exceptions. I do 10% for waitstaff unless the service is great or excellent in which case they get 20%-30%.

Delivery people I don't really tip rather I let them keep the change since I pay in cash because only moron would 19.8% interest on a pizza.

I tip hairdressers and hair stylists, but not hair cutters, like the idiots at Bo-Rics and places like that. When I say I don't know how I want my hair cut, they ought to offer suggestions instead of standing there like a cow chewing cud, but I solved that problem by not patronizing them any more, since they're incompetent and lack any real talent anyway. A real hairdresser I will tip, especially if the shock the crap out of me.

I get my shoes shined about twice a year and tip the shoe-shine man as well.

I don't go to Starsucks because they suck, but if I see tip jars sitting out I don't ever go back. That's the best way to express displeasure.
You have a thing or two to learn about tipping, I would say. Got a pen and paper?

If you give a server a 10% tip, they're going to wonder what they did wrong. They depend on that money to survive and oftentimes, they bend over backwards to ensure good service. Tipping 10% on good or even average service is a slap in the face.

Delivery people, they are spending their gas money to get your food to you and they are putting their lives at risk on the road. Not tipping them on a regular basis might possibly result in some dawdling, not that I condone it, but it happens A LOT (when I was 20 and a delivery driver, you bet I participated in this kind of behavior--stop off for gas, walk slowly, go through a drive-through and grab some food, run by the house to let the dog out, etc. Like I said, at this point, I'm mature enough to accept that some people just suck as tippers, but many delivery drivers are young and will do worse than just take their time on a delivery). I couldn't stand to have someone tell me to keep like 30 cents in change as a tip, I honestly wanted to give it back and say "No, you need it more than I do." Not sure why you would consider it interest, you are receiving a service and the drivers deserve tips. It doesn't take much to pull out an extra couple bucks if you're paying cash, that is not an excuse.

You're supposed to tip hair cutters, just not the owners of these places. Same as you would tip servers, or I guess I should say, same as normal people tip servers, 15% for average service, 20% and 10% for great and not-so-great, respectively. If you hate the cut, don't tip them at all. Again, they're probably wondering what they did wrong if you're not tipping them.

Not patronizing an establishment b/c they have tips jars out is just plain childish.
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Old 12-13-2010, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Atlanta metro
5,645 posts, read 3,972,652 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xanathos View Post
I don't tip on pizza if there's a delivery charge. I know for a fact the delivery person gets a large percentage of that charge, so I consider that the tip.
Not true. At all. No place I have worked has ever given drivers "a large percentage" of whatever delivery charge they utilize, that is more so they can pay the drivers their hourly wages (which is never as much as minimum wage). I noticed that on Papa John's receipts, they are now printing something about the delivery charge not being compensation for the driver and that the drivers should be tipped. Take a look next time you order, double check me on that.
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Old 12-13-2010, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Atlanta metro
5,645 posts, read 3,972,652 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
Why is that? Tips are not taxed, here at least. Tips are like Christmas presents. Whether or not someone gets a tip does not matter in terms of taxation.
In Florida, tips are counted as normal income. Unless, of course, you're not claiming it. Which is fraud. Oh, wait, you're in Europe, again, apples and oranges. I do know that in many EU countries, tips are included as part of the bill or wages are paid by the restaurant, so tipping is more rare there. I can see why you would think that, but again, you are speaking on an American issue here, and you don't really know what you're talking about.

Also, if servers/drivers are not claiming enough tips, the store has to pay it out of payroll to make them earn at least minimum wage. In 99.9% of cases, when this happens, it is b/c they are not claiming their tips, not b/c they're not making enough money. I never understood why managers let people get away with that.
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Old 12-13-2010, 09:16 AM
 
19,216 posts, read 12,464,102 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andrea3821 View Post
In Florida, tips are counted as normal income. Unless, of course, you're not claiming it. Which is fraud.
Is your fraud a fraud if your fraud defrauds a fraud?
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Old 12-13-2010, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Atlanta metro
5,645 posts, read 3,972,652 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hawkeye2009 View Post
That is why one should always tip in cash, even when paying for the meal with a credit card. These people work hard for thier money and paying taxes for tips is silly. Give them cash and let them decide whether to report it or not.
The ethical and responsible thing is to report it. I didn't report mine for awhile and then I realized, duh, I want to buy a house one day so I need to start reporting it. They ask for two years of tax returns when you try to get a mortgage loan so I needed to report it to prove my income. You also need to prove income to buy a car and that kind of thing. It's advantageous to report all income, even if you do have to pay more in taxes. You also set more aside for SS if you do this, although at my age, I'm not exactly holding my breath on getting any return on what I paid in.
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Old 12-13-2010, 09:17 AM
 
Location: San Antonio Texas
11,435 posts, read 15,943,293 times
Reputation: 5224
Quote:
Originally Posted by azriverfan. View Post
Right but let's not hand the guy at McDonalds an extra dollar because there is no tip jar out. It only makes sense to tip the Starbucks guy and the person at Papa Johns because they had a tip jar out. If they don't have one, then don't throw in an extra quarter! After all the Starbucks and Papa Johns employees work so much harder than the fast food employees, the WalMart cashiers etc. Brilliant argument!!!
Yes, it was a brilliant argument. Instead of putting a big fat 0 on the tip amount, I would have just put a dash (-) instead. it draws less attention from the server. Waiters and former waiters often have huge egos when it comes to how much they earn from their work. 10% was once standard, then 15%, now 20%. what about the folks at the fast food restaurant tht work much harder and often come from less privileged backgrounds? don't they deserve tips too?
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