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Old 03-08-2011, 07:11 PM
 
48,519 posts, read 81,407,913 times
Reputation: 17990

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Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
I think every company has some evil person who's only job is to make the billing as incomprehensible as possible. A friend of my mothers who works in a billing department got a medical bill and she couldn't understand it. Took the same bill to her insurance company and they couldn't figure out...
You do realise that billing now is based on a code. That code is what the person is treated for . It means basically whether medicare or private insurance they are paid a certain amount for that code. Anything further as to be recoded to get anything more in payment and approved.
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Old 03-08-2011, 07:35 PM
 
Location: Maine
561 posts, read 423,833 times
Reputation: 306
Default You're Making My Point

Quote:
Originally Posted by Grim Reader View Post
On the subject of cancer, the reasons the US has good stats are a) An aggressive screening regime that leads to earlier detection, which in itself makes 5-years survival figures look better. b) A higher incidence of cancer to start with, in part due to the use of CT scans in said detection. c) Considerable overdiagnosis. See "Prostate Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment After the Introduction of Prostate-Specific Antigen Screening: 1986-2005." August 2009 Journal of the National Cancer Institute.
Any one of these should be reason enough to not turn back the clock. Those who argue for european-style-government-run- healthcare should take a look under the hood before they buy this klunker.
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Old 03-08-2011, 07:37 PM
 
14,253 posts, read 14,822,477 times
Reputation: 13626
Quote:
Originally Posted by Recovering Democrat View Post
Any one of these should be reason enough to not turn back the clock. Those who argue for european-style-government-run- healthcare should take a look under the hood before they buy this klunker.
Nobody is arguing for European style healthcare. What we are discussing is how we take cost out of our own system.
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Old 03-08-2011, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Maine
561 posts, read 423,833 times
Reputation: 306
Default Guilty As Charged

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaggy001 View Post
Here we go, lets cherry pick a few statistics and use it to "prove" that our system is just great.
If by "cherry pick" you mean cite a decades-long assessment of 23 countries reflecting the health outcomes of millions of individuals, then I'm guilty as charged. But then so too are all of these governments who also use the information contained in the assessment. Are they cherry picking too?
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Old 03-08-2011, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Maine
561 posts, read 423,833 times
Reputation: 306
Default You're Wrong . . .

Quote:
Originally Posted by Art123 View Post
The reason that the free market will not work in health care is that in order for a free market to work, people have to make rational decisions as to how they spend their money. You can not make rational decisions when it comes to the health of your loved ones.
The current system prevents us from making rational decisions. For example, if I only have to pay a $20 co-pay for my child's prescription, then I don't care if my insurance company (or government) pays a true cost of $100 or $1,000. It's all the same to me.

On the other hand, if I had to pay for the prescription out-of-pocket, then I would shop around to find the lowest reasonable cost.

Introduce market forces and we will see a decrease in healthcare costs. Increase government involvement and costs will continue to spiral out of control.
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Old 03-08-2011, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Maine
561 posts, read 423,833 times
Reputation: 306
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaggy001 View Post
What we are discussing is how we take cost out of our own system.
As I said earlier:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Recovering Democrat View Post
Expand Medicaid to include a larger number of uninsured (excluding illegals).
This would cover most of the people you're referring to who might otherwise find themselves in a life or death situation and no health insurance.

The vast majority, however, should be covered by private insurance policies we could purchase across state lines with no mandatory coverage (i.e., maternity care for a single male).
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Old 03-08-2011, 08:26 PM
 
Location: state of procrastination
3,487 posts, read 6,155,161 times
Reputation: 2883
Here are the top problems that I can see:

1) All the various insurance companies, and all the administrative and overhead costs associated with it. If this can be restructured, we would have huge savings.

2) End of life care. A large chunk of the money is being spent on futile care in the last 2 years of life. No wonder the life expectancies aren't going up, but the costs are. People just have to know when to let go!

3) ER services. This must be thinned out because it is too expensive. Right now there is a shortage of ER physicians because they are too busy taking care of chronic problems for people who do not have regular healthcare, not real emergencies. We have to either start denying people care in the ER, or we have to provide a basic healthcare plan for those who have none. Pick your poison.

4) No common healthcare records. I can't tell you how many times tests are repeated over and over in different hospitals because patients (esp those without insurance) jump from hospital to hospital, ER to ER. Certainly it becomes a huge waste when somebody is given the mega workup 3 times for the same problem. It's infuriating and frustrating.

5) Defensive medicine.
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Old 03-08-2011, 08:35 PM
 
Location: World
3,202 posts, read 3,243,669 times
Reputation: 2117
USA has worst and most expensive health care system in the world. Unfortunately corporates, insurance companies have brainwashed them for so many years in making them believe that their health care is better. They should look at India, China, Japan, Germany, England, Canada at how their health care costs and facilities are. They should ask any resident of these countries living in USA that how do they like USA health care system.
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Old 03-08-2011, 08:47 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,126 posts, read 99,292,194 times
Reputation: 31590
Quote:
Originally Posted by miyu View Post
Here are the top problems that I can see:

1) All the various insurance companies, and all the administrative and overhead costs associated with it. If this can be restructured, we would have huge savings.

Agreed.

2) End of life care. A large chunk of the money is being spent on futile care in the last 2 years of life. No wonder the life expectancies aren't going up, but the costs are. People just have to know when to let go!

All that says is that people are sicker in the last two years of their lives.

3) ER services. This must be thinned out because it is too expensive. Right now there is a shortage of ER physicians because they are too busy taking care of chronic problems for people who do not have regular healthcare, not real emergencies. We have to either start denying people care in the ER, or we have to provide a basic healthcare plan for those who have none. Pick your poison.

It is against the law to deny emergency care to a patient b/c they don't have the funds, if the hospital takes federal funds (which is pretty much all of them). There have also been studies that show that insured patients also over-use emergency rooms.

4) No common healthcare records. I can't tell you how many times tests are repeated over and over in different hospitals because patients (esp those without insurance) jump from hospital to hospital, ER to ER. Certainly it becomes a huge waste when somebody is given the mega workup 3 times for the same problem. It's infuriating and frustrating.

So you work in health care? While I agree EMR is great, and our office is switching to it some time in the future, we send a lot of lab and X-ray reports to specialists. Most of these "mega workups" are not emergencies and there is plenty of time to send for records.

5) Defensive medicine.

Has its pros and cons.
*********************************************
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Old 03-08-2011, 10:46 PM
 
16,438 posts, read 18,600,181 times
Reputation: 9494
Quote:
Originally Posted by munna21977 View Post
USA has worst and most expensive health care system in the world.
Certainly the most expensive, and far from the best. It's a white collar criminal organization designed to fleece a captive audience.
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