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Old 03-16-2011, 09:01 PM
 
16,710 posts, read 18,941,250 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
I'm firmly against subsidies, time to start taxing people with electric cars per mile.
No thanks, I prefer the government NOT be in my car... they already invaded my home... why would I want them in my car... is there no privacy anymore?
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Old 03-16-2011, 09:11 PM
 
37,072 posts, read 38,355,384 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evilnewbie View Post
No thanks, I prefer the government NOT be in my car... they already invaded my home... why would I want them in my car... is there no privacy anymore?

Roads are paid for in most part by fuel taxes which on average are almost 50 cents a gallon, electric cars don't use fuel so they are not taxed to use the roads they are driving on. They are subsidized by those using cars and trucks powered by liquid fuels, it's even used as selling point because it drives down the cost to run one. It's only fair that they be taxed to use the roads too, the fairest way to assess it would be using a formula based on the average weight of the car and per mile.
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Old 03-16-2011, 09:22 PM
 
Location: The Republic of Texas
60,520 posts, read 30,701,915 times
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The government makes more off a gallon of gas than the big oil companies do.
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Old 03-16-2011, 09:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
Roads are paid for in most part by fuel taxes which on average are almost 50 cents a gallon, electric cars don't use fuel so they are not taxed to use the roads they are driving on. They are subsidized by those using cars and trucks powered by liquid fuels, it's even used as selling point because it drives down the cost to run one. It's only fair that they be taxed to use the roads too, the fairest way to assess it would be using a formula based on the average weight of the car and per mile.
I know the problems with electric cars... all I am suggesting is that there is another way to do it without having Big Government inside my car... there are more than one way to skin a cat... that way you mentioned is probably not the best way to approach that problem...
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Old 03-16-2011, 09:35 PM
 
48,519 posts, read 81,130,238 times
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The automobile actaully just allowed peopel to do what they would have liked but where unable to because of lack of jobs i those locations and being confined to being close to work. The inductalist of the time made sure that the transportation and energy to fuel the inductrializatio was keep in confined areas. But WWII pretty much cnhage that and demand is what drove roadways to get out fot eh city. It became the dream to live i more space than a ant pile in ghetto conditipons. It actaulyl allowed those who ancestros had to move to cities to return to their roots really.It hasn't stop since. The industrailist always had that freedom and maintain there estates in the coutnry away from the maddeness of the ant pile.
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Old 03-16-2011, 09:46 PM
 
37,072 posts, read 38,355,384 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evilnewbie View Post
I know the problems with electric cars... all I am suggesting is that there is another way to do it without having Big Government inside my car... there are more than one way to skin a cat... that way you mentioned is probably not the best way to approach that problem...
You referring to the GPS idea to calculate this? I'm not suggesting that all and would be strongly against it. I don't want "Big brother" following me around either.

There is ohther ways this could be done, for example most states require a yearly inspection, the mileage and tax could be calculated then. Quarterly payments over the next year, etc.

In any event you have to account for mileage and weight of the car to fairly distribute the burden which the fuel tax achieves to some degree.
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Old 03-16-2011, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Missouri
3,725 posts, read 2,976,778 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knowledgeiskey View Post
Lobbying created the urban sprawl by lobbying for the government to subsidize roads and highways.

Public Transportation - The Great American Streetcar Scandal

Ralph Nader: The Highway Lobby
The idea for national roads came along well before 1956.

Origins of the Interstate Part 1 of 7
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Old 03-16-2011, 10:02 PM
 
37,072 posts, read 38,355,384 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geofra View Post
The idea for national roads came along well before 1956.

Origins of the Interstate Part 1 of 7

If you really wanted to get technical about it... From the history page of the PA Turnpike "Americas First Superhighway":

Quote:
The Pennsylvania Turnpike - About the PTC

President George Washington publicly favored the establishment of roads to promote the westward expansion of our nation. In 1791, the legislature of the Pennsylvanian Commonwealth approved a state-wide transportation plan and a year later created the Philadelphia and Lancaster Turnpike Company. The turnpike charter called for the construction of a 62-mile log-surfaced road, which provided successful transport for settlers and their goods over the muddy territories.

The Lancaster Turnpike route was later replaced by a canal after 1800 and then the beginnings of a railroad in the 1880s. The Allegheny Mountains posed a barrier to William Vanderbilt and Andrew Carnegie, who at the time were building a railroad from Harrisburg west to Pittsburgh to compete with a more northerly route provided by the booming Pennsylvania Railroad. Over one-half of the roadbed was constructed and seven tunnels partially excavated before Vanderbilt went broke in 1885.

As early as 1910, ideas arose to convert the abandoned railway route into a motorway. The idea of a turnpike to cross the Alleghenies was supported by the trucking industry as well as the motoring public. A feasibility study began in 1934 with surveyors collecting information and engineers selecting routes and preparing plans. Although the U.S. Bureau of Public Roads favored improving urban highways instead of building intercity expressways, the concept of limited-access highways was further inspired by the construction of the Henry Hudson Parkway on the west side of Manhattan in 1934, the Bronx River Parkway, the Merritt Parkway in Connecticut, and the Arroyo Seco Parkway in Los Angeles.
Actually a pretty unique road, when you considerthe terrain it goes through it's probably the flattest and straightest road in the US. They don't build like this anymore, banked corners etc. It's so straight on some stretches fatigue is common, modern highways purposely bend and change directions where practical to combat this.

Here's really cool video on an abandoned section:



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Old 03-16-2011, 10:03 PM
 
16,710 posts, read 18,941,250 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
You referring to the GPS idea to calculate this? I'm not suggesting that all and would be strongly against it. I don't want "Big brother" following me around either.

There is ohther ways this could be done, for example most states require a yearly inspection, the mileage and tax could be calculated then. Quarterly payments over the next year, etc.

In any event you have to account for mileage and weight of the car to fairly distribute the burden which the fuel tax achieves to some degree.
Trust me... the government is one that would just walk away from GPS calculations... they would push for it because it will help them bypass privacy under the guise of road infrastructure... The government has done this countless times... You are heading down the path of good intentions, that paves itself to Hell... there are better alternatives... the government will eventually demand that instead of inspections, its just "easier" to do GPS for everyone's "benefit"... they will make some excuse for that down the road.... they ALWAYS do... there are other ways of taxation without adding government intrusion to the equation... Look at the creation of Homeland Security... a department that spies on its own citizens... is it really necessary to spy on government dissidents? When did we become Libya that we have a nation of dissidents? I don't trust the government to mind its own affairs... its past history shows it is incapable of doing that... They will use some excuse down the road to monitor all Americans, for our safety and helping the road's infrastructure... yeah, right...
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Old 03-17-2011, 01:30 AM
 
6,868 posts, read 7,728,114 times
Reputation: 2963
How did highways and sprawl make this country prosperous?
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