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Old 05-12-2011, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,443 posts, read 17,681,375 times
Reputation: 15560

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Backspace View Post
None of the gates are automatic, it's a very manual process involving a couple guys on a crane manually lifting each gate panel. It's very much a choice to move the flooding from areas like Baton Rouge and New Orleans to much poorer and less populated areas in South Louisiana.
In the case of the Birds Point Spillway in SE Missouri, they had to blow the levee, nothing automatic about that at all.
133,000 acres of some of the best farmlnd in the world flooded.
Mogal has a very interesting thread about that in the Mo forum.
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Old 05-12-2011, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,443 posts, read 17,681,375 times
Reputation: 15560
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
During the 1993 floods, I was in Florida visiting family. My BIL gave me a book with headlines from the Miama Herald going back to 1900, and one of the pages from the first decade of the century was news about flooding of the Mississippi and how damage was estimated to be around one million dollars.

I have never seen the Mississippi River in person, but that river is something I would like to see before I die. I watched a fascinating travel show some years ago on a bike trip down the Mississippi that begins around the point where the river becomes navigable. While I'm not much of a bike rider, the journey sounded good.
That sounds like a bucket list trip, I have never done that myself, although I have made the drive lots and lots of times.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lifelongMOgal View Post
The river roads along the Mississippi are an especially beautiful drive in the Fall when the leaves are showing off their color change.

As the delta floods I wonder if positive unintended consequences will be to purge the remaining oil slicks out of the wetland marshes and bayous and help heal them so the wildlife may sucessfuloly return in a few years to come. Let's hope some good can come of this anyway.
I agree with you on all points.
Its really nice to see that those of us with vehemently opposing viewpoints can all agree on something. (Except for one, and I suspect he is grandstanding.)
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Old 05-12-2011, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,443 posts, read 17,681,375 times
Reputation: 15560
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCalCroozer View Post
You can sympathise with those affected.........people like me will strive to find answers and solutions to the problems. What does sympathy accomplish? Nothing! I grew up in St. Louis, MO. I know flooding very well and the tragedy that comes along with it.
Sympathy for those affected by the flood of 93 in Sainte Genevieve led me to live in my car for a month, sandbag, cook and do other things of a volunteer nature to help, along with dozens of other people that saw the news coverage, and came to help save my hometown.
Did it work?
We saved the town, so you tell me, Socal, if sympathy does nothing.
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Old 05-12-2011, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
49,563 posts, read 41,587,161 times
Reputation: 21204
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCalCroozer View Post
You can sympathise with those affected.........people like me will strive to find answers and solutions to the problems. What does sympathy accomplish? Nothing! I grew up in St. Louis, MO. I know flooding very well and the tragedy that comes along with it.
No one ever said we shouldn't try to find solutions to the problems, but to call these people idiots, at a time when they are sufrering isn't helping them or solving anything. I am glad you are a scientist or whatever so you can find an answer while some of us continue to do what we can to help the victoms. What you are saying is the same as many said after Katrina only worse. Many of the people in New Orleans choose to ignore the warnings, the mayor and governor weren't on the ball, but calling people idiots at the time served no purpose.

How about the people living near Tunica and working for the casinos, are they all idiots? Should we not have feelings for them, they have lost their jobs or certainly some of their income, the casinos are totally flooded, people in Memphis and further south now are unable to get to work, if they have jobs. So let's forget them and work on a solution...??? And while you are working on the flood solution maybe you can find a way to stop earthquakes as well..
NIta
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Old 05-12-2011, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Reality
9,958 posts, read 3,898,046 times
Reputation: 3251
Quote:
Originally Posted by kshe95girl View Post
In the case of the Birds Point Spillway in SE Missouri, they had to blow the levee, nothing automatic about that at all.
133,000 acres of some of the best farmlnd in the world flooded.
Mogal has a very interesting thread about that in the Mo forum.
The corps of engineers have made it a lot easier in South Louisiana, between the Bonnet Carre and the Morganza spillways it's easy to flood thousands of homes in order to save metro areas like New Orleans and Baton Rouge.
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Old 05-12-2011, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
5,869 posts, read 2,924,033 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lifelongMOgal View Post
The river roads along the Mississippi are an especially beautiful drive in the Fall when the leaves are showing off their color change.

As the delta floods I wonder if positive unintended consequences will be to purge the remaining oil slicks out of the wetland marshes and bayous and help heal them so the wildlife may sucessfuloly return in a few years to come. Let's hope some good can come of this anyway.


It could happen if they would let the flood wave wash out of the levees and into the coastal marshes down there. It might also help with the serious erosion problem along the coast. That coastal area needs the infusion of flood waters with all the sediment. Lousiana is starting to look at letting this happen. Now is a good time to direct some of these flood waters towards those marshes.
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Old 05-12-2011, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Texas
14,023 posts, read 9,766,202 times
Reputation: 7396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toyman at Jewel Lake View Post
The Mississippi and vitrtually every river have historically flooded. Flood plains provide the natural area for this excess water to disperse and avoid the excessive, artifical "crests" like we now see with the Mississippi. Learn from history people, and stop building residential areas on flood plains. The federal government needs to radically reduce the federal flood insurance program, which rewards people for foolish behavior. Limit construction on flood plains to specific business/commercial needs associated with the waterway, and build those facilities to handle seasonal floods.

In relation to the Mississippi, the problem with your plan is just how large the flood plain is!

On the west bank, the original, natural flood plain runs roughly along a line from Cape Girardeau, to Poplar Bluff, MO, to Little Rock and Pine Bluff, AR, down to Monroe to just east of Alexandria, LA. The area encompasses hundreds of thousands of square miles and includes thousands of towns and cities, some of them quite sizeable.

Carruthersville and Sikeston, MO; Blytheville, West Memphis, Forrest City, Jonesboro, Wynne, Lake Village, AR; Tallulah, Ferriday, Monroe, LA. All would have to be abandoned and moved elsewhere. So too would the industry and business which has grown up to serve the river and the rice farmers.

On the east bank, everything on a line from Memphis to Grenada, MS to Vicksburg and around the shores of Lake Ponchartrain east of Gonzales, LA would have to be put off limits to further development. All the massive refineries, chemical plants and port facilities which make up America's busiest port complex would be left high and dry.

Yes, the levee system artificially forces the Mississippi into a channel nature doesn't recommend, but at this point, we have no other alternative than to maintain it, and strengthen it where necessary. Unless, of course, you're willing to pay the cost to relocate literally MILLIONS of people AND do without the gasoline, common and industrial chemicals, rice, soy beans and other food stuffs produced in the flood plain, and other benefits of living alongside a dangerous river.
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Old 05-12-2011, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,443 posts, read 17,681,375 times
Reputation: 15560
Quote:
Originally Posted by stillkit View Post
In relation to the Mississippi, the problem with your plan is just how large the flood plain is!

On the west bank, the original, natural flood plain runs roughly along a line from Cape Girardeau, to Poplar Bluff, MO, to Little Rock and Pine Bluff, AR, down to Monroe to just east of Alexandria, LA. The area encompasses hundreds of thousands of square miles and includes thousands of towns and cities, some of them quite sizeable.

Carruthersville and Sikeston, MO; Blytheville, West Memphis, Forrest City, Jonesboro, Wynne, Lake Village, AR; Tallulah, Ferriday, Monroe, LA. All would have to be abandoned and moved elsewhere. So too would the industry and business which has grown up to serve the river and the rice farmers.

On the east bank, everything on a line from Memphis to Grenada, MS to Vicksburg and around the shores of Lake Ponchartrain east of Gonzales, LA would have to be put off limits to further development. All the massive refineries, chemical plants and port facilities which make up America's busiest port complex would be left high and dry.

Yes, the levee system artificially forces the Mississippi into a channel nature doesn't recommend, but at this point, we have no other alternative than to maintain it, and strengthen it where necessary. Unless, of course, you're willing to pay the cost to relocate literally MILLIONS of people AND do without the gasoline, common and industrial chemicals, rice, soy beans and other food stuffs produced in the flood plain, and other benefits of living alongside a dangerous river.
Actually, the flood plain starts at Sainte Genevieve.
Its very small, when the French originally settled the area, they called it Le Grande Champ.
We still call it The Big Field, and boy, it sure does flood, and is incredibly fertile farmland.
Google Earth it, its just south of the town, you can see the flood plain, its narrow, but its there.
ETA: Poplar Bluff is over 60 miles away from the Mississippi, it sits on the banks of the Black River, which is a tributary to the Mississippi.
Their problem is neglected levees, used to live there, my mothers family is from there.
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Old 05-12-2011, 12:34 PM
Status: "Fall is almost over!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
69,637 posts, read 59,710,798 times
Reputation: 19961
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCalCroozer View Post
You can sympathise with those affected.........people like me will strive to find answers and solutions to the problems. What does sympathy accomplish? Nothing! I grew up in St. Louis, MO. I know flooding very well and the tragedy that comes along with it.
"People like me", eh? The need right now, is for 1) sympathy, and 2) help for these people who were flooded out. Then "people like you" can get on with it.
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Old 05-12-2011, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Long Island, New York
16,003 posts, read 5,738,629 times
Reputation: 3567
question:


to the towns/villages/citys that get destroyed

would it be smarter to rebuild a little further inland away from the problem????


also a second question

would dredging the river and therefore lowering its level also help???



I dont live by the Miss, but live on the shore on long island,, and I always laugh when people put thier houses right on the water, then wonder why it flooded during a huricaine or nor'easter
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